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August 07, 1982 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-08-07

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ArTts
The Michigan Daily Saturday, August 7, 1982 Page /

Medieval days
Touring is the key word. Though they
By Blake R atcliffe may lack the pageant upon which the
15th century Medieval players carted
G ETEST OUT thine burlap tunic, their plays around, the festival players
oileth up thine sandles, and let spare no sweat in making the mobility
ushereth from thine mouth a cry of of their productions authentic, setting
good cheer, for verily the times up stations thoughout town. The festival
Medievalareuponus. troupe has already covered four
Thanks to efforts of some persistent locations (West Park, Burns Park, The
Ann Arborites with a passion for swor- Ark, and the Arboreteum), and this
ds, colored hose, and scratchy woolen week they will add a fifth location when
underwear, the Medieval Festival rises they perform this weekend at North
for its 13th year with more pomp and Campus.
regality than ever before. Like most aspects of the Medieval
The whole city can once again revel Festival, the attention to authenticity is
in God-fearing plays, bawdy skits, a personal matter. "There are some
court dances, rowdy juggling, damsel- people in the festival who are interested
wooing music, and all the other things in the period, they do the research;
we've spent the past 400 years longing others just want to have fun," said
for. Bernstein.
What began in 1969 as a small, one This mixture of scholars, who are in-
weekend affair organized by a graduate tent upon making sure even their
student in Art History, has now grown shoelaces are knotted in proper
into an annual, two weekend festival. Medieval fashion, and crazies, who
don't care if they're in Star Wars or the
weekend's festivities, feareth not, the Middle Ages as long as they can play
joviality continues today and tomorrow with swords, gives a home-spun texture
at the School of Music, as professional to the Festival that makes it unique
and amateur entertainers once again among Ann Arbor's pagentry. You
seek to dazzle anyone, be ye hard-core don't really know who is the audience
scholar looking for a revival of your and who are the performers;
favorite play, or a stage-struck body- everyone's on display, proudly strut-
builder who just stumbled out of Conan. ting their costumes like the Medieval
r "This mix of amateur and equivalent to a Christian Dior party.
professional is how it would've been
done back then," David Bernstein, Nowehere is this mingling more ap-
theater coordinator and founding parent than in the plays themselves
member of the festival, explained. "We where the amateur actors stand next to
try to keep the tradition of a touring professionals. Although better this year
neighborhood organization." than in years past, the performances

are here
are still pock marked by easily correc-
ted flaws (i.e., inaudible actors,
blocked lines of vision, and long
speeches without any movement to en-
tertain the spectator's eye). However,
these are counterbalanced by some
high points when the actors really con-
nect with their texts.
In the long run, the plays are the real
stars. Once again we see how moving
and complex are these works of art -
so often considered the mothball fleet of
literature. Notable this year are the
productions of the Wakefield Master's
Cain and Abel and a stage adaptation of
two of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.
Even though Ann Arbor is a large
INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ave of Uberty 761-9700
HURRY ENDS THURS!
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
BEST"-GENE SISKEL
DINER
FRI, MQN-7:00, 9:10
SAT, SUN-
12:30, 2:40, 4:50, 7:00, 9:10
shows beforeI
A DESPERATE ROMANCE!
AN
OFFICER
AND A
GENTLEMAN
DEBRA RICHARD
(URBAN *" (AMERICAN
COWBOY) GIGOLO)
WINGER GERE

again
town, you really do get a sense that the
Medieval Festival is a personal event,
and one not to be missed.
375 N ALE
769AGE04
"1.00 TUESDAY IS DISCONTINUED"
,5 CHEISTOPHER ATEINS
A - 10:090
Tough
12:15
A Midsummer Night's
Sex Comedy
OhR eturn VIADRS OF THE
AdBat.N L OST ARK [9
10.12:1s 230 44 7:00.930
THE MOVIES AT BRIARWOOD
I 94&"S STATE (AdIo t'to JC. Pnny)
1 00 UESDYS DICONTNU0D
2:30
20h ETUY

'Hill Street Blues'
tops Emmy leaders

LOS ANGELES (AP) - NBC's Cin-
derella series, "Hill Street Blues," was
off to the ball again Thursday with 21
Emmy nominations, the same as a year
ago.
The police drama, which got nearly
twice as many nominations as any
other show, dominated some categories
and grabbed all five nominations for
best supporting actor in a drama series.
In 1981 it received eight Emmys.
The Emmy presentations will be
telecast live from the Pasadena Civic
Auditorium by ABC on. Sunday, Sept.
19. John Forsythe and Marlo Thomas
will be the hosts.
"Hill Street Blues" was nominated as
the outstanding drama series and
Daniel J. Travanti and Veronica Hamel
were nominated for best lead actor and
actress in a drama series. It won all
five nominations for best supporting ac-
tor: Taurean Blacque, Michael Conrad,
Charles Haid, Michael Warren and
Bruce Weitz. Barbara Bosson and Betty
Thomas were nomiated for best suppor-
ting actress in a drama series.
"Isn't that something?" said a joyous
Travanti. "We thought we'd pick up one
or two more nominations for supporting
actor, but this is amazing. It's nice
when your work is recognized."
NBC, third in the ratings, swamped

Travanti
... nominated for best actor

The Secret of MI.M.H.
10:00 12:15 2:304:45.7:00 9:30
Forced Vengeance
10, 12:15, 2:30. 4:457000 930
-MIDNIGHTS-
THE BEST LITTLE
WHOREHOUSE IN TEXAS 1200
DAWN OF THE DEAD 11 30
BLADE RUNNER 1200
ROCKY HORROR 1200

its more popular opposition with a total
of 90 Emmy nominations. CBS, the
front-running network in the ratings,
had 83, and ABC got 70. PBS received 29.
nominations, including 11 for
"Brideshead Revisited" and 13
nominations went to syndicated shows.

FRI, MON-7:40, 9:55
SAT, SUN (R)
12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 9:55

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