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August 06, 1982 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-08-06

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, August 6, 1982-Page 5
Leary vs. Liddy: An odd debate

LOS ANGELES (AP)- They are an'
odd couple-a former political dirty
trickster and an ex-acid freak. But G.
Gordon Liddy and Timothy Leary have
one of the hottest acts around.
The convicted Watergate conspirator
and ex-drug cult guru cheerfully admit
that they don't agree on a thing. But
their dialogue has been drawing
capacity crowds wherever they go.
"HE'S DARTH Vader to my Luke
Skywalker," Leary says of Liddy. "I
have always felt that Mr. Liddy is one
of the most dangerous and eloquent ad-
vocates of a disastrous political
program which has ruined the United
States in the past 40 years."
"He hasn't changed his ideas one
bit," Liddy counters. "He's putting for-
th ' the same ideas to another
generation, and God forbid he should
succeed . . . These- ideas are very
dangerous."
Liddy and Leary recently did a two-
night stand at the Wilshire Ebell
theater in Los Angeles. They are taking

'He (G. Gordon Liddy) is Darth Vader to my
Luke Skywalker. Mr. Liddy's ideas are turning
America into a banana republic..'-
-dTimothy Leary,
eX-drug cult guru

a break from the talk circuit, and plan
to resume their traveling debate in the
fall.
BUT DESPITE the distaste each
holds for the other's ideas, they hasten
to add that it does not extend to their
personal relationship. In fact the two
men profess to being fast friends.
"Gordon Liddy is intelligent, he's
highly educated; he's deeply idealistic;
he's demonstrated extraordinary
courage in standing up for his beliefs,
including having willingly, almost
voluntarily, gone to prison for a long
time," Leary said.
Said Liddy: "Tim Leary has a mar-
velous elfin sense of wit and Irish
humor. He doesn't get ponderous and

heavy. In fact he gets so light
sometimes, he floats. It becomes a dif-
ficult task for me to penetrate that veil
of charm and show these ideas for what
they really are, which is very
dangerous principles."
EACH DEBATE opens with the op-
ponents stating their views on in-
dividual freedom versus the power of
the state. A moderator from the com-
munity then poses specific questions.
LEARY SAID that his most difficult
moments come when Liddy 'presents
my position in an exaggerating way and
makes it sound as though I'm defending
the Hillside Strangler and drug use by
children, neither of which I do.
"I think Mr. Liddy's ideas are turning
ARBOR ANN
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HURYENDS THURSI
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
EST-GENESISKEL

Eckstein hopes to expand
energy equipment industry

America into a banana republic, and
are robbing American youth of their
hope for the future,' Leary said. "Gor-
don Liddy is a'rock-ribbed Republican
somewhere to the right of the 3-H boys -
Herbert Hoover, Jr. Edgar Hoover and
Jesse Helms."
"In my opinion," Liddy said of
Leary's beliefs, "they suggest the ac-
ceptability of totally self-centered,
iresponsible behavior, and license as
distinguished from liberty."
"1.00 TUESDAY IS DISCONTINUED"
K . RISTY MNICHOL
1.~ g v CHISTOPHER ATKINS
Thins areS
g10:00
2530
4:4s
Thins are
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1 - 4 A Os v T A e t o 9 :30Pe n y
2:30

(Continuedfrom Page 1)
Government could help expand the
energy extraction industry in a "sim-
ple, inexpensive" way by hiring four or
five people to function as, a national
marketing facility for several dozen
machine shops in the state, according
to Eckstein.
Another area that is ready for a new
approach, Eckstein said, is higher
education.
TO PRESERVE its educational
system in difficult economic times,
Michigan should consider creating a
statewide mechanism for higher
educationalplanning, he said.
The state could avoid duplicating
programs among its universities,
rather than simply cutting its in-
stitutions across-the-board, by utilizing
statewide planning, Eckstein said.
"We have to start thinking about
some kind of state mechanism where

we start saying 'Do we have too much
duplication in the programs offered in
higher education? And if we do, which
.of the programs ought to survive and
which are the ones that ought not to?"
he said.
To obtain more money for higher
education and for creating incentives to
new industries, Eckstein said he may
try to eliminate some of the ad-
ministration involved in government
programs.
"My impression is that you have too
many generals and colonels," he said,
"and when you cut the budget you cut
out the privates and the sergeants. That
may not be the best way to proceed."
Eckstein's opponents in the
primary are Lana Pollack, James
Murray and Ron Allen. Murray will
be featured tomorrow,

DIMIR
FRI, MON-7:00, 9:10
SAT, SUN-
12:30, 2:40, 4:50, 7:00, 9:10
(R)
SAT " SUN'
on'ys2.0
s howsbefore
A DESPERATE ROMANCE!
AN
OFFICER
ANDA
GENTLEMAN
DEBRA RICHARD
(URBAN *" (AMERICAN
COWBOY) GIGOLO)
WINGER GERE

Nuclear reactor designed
for peaceful atomic research
LContinued from Page 3

campus," Kerr said.
According to Kerr, the University's
radiation disposal service is contacted
to remove and ship out radioactive
waste, although some waste materials
can be stored at the Phoenix facility for
four to five months.
"It could be a problem, but it isn't a
problem yet," Kerr said, of waste
disosal. 'At any time, these places
could be closed down by the people run-
ning them," he added.
EXAMPLES OF medical advances
made possible by the reactor include
the synthesis of radiopharmacueticals
for medical use and an x-ray technique
termed "x-ray fluorescense" which can
be used to look at objects more
precisely than conventional x-ray
techniques.
Kerr said the reactor produces
dradioactive Iodine 131, a tracer sub-
stance used to track down and treat
certain forms of cancer. In a recent
University medical breakthrough, a

form of this substance - developed by
using the reactor - was found to suc-
cessfully treat previously untreatable
tumors of the adrenal glands.
According Ito Kerr, the project
operates on a yearly budget of ap-
proximately $550,000. Approximately
$380,000 comes directly from the
University's General Fund budget. The
reminder is provided by research
support and a small amount left over
from funds raised to originally start the
project.
Although use of the reactor is
available to private industry, faculty
and students are given first priority,
then researchers from other univer-
sities are given time and space that is
left, Kerr said.
"We try to make the facility available
as much as we can," he said, adding tht
none of the available laboratory space
is alloted on a permanent basis,
although some projects may take up to
five years to complete.

The Secret of/I.M.H.
10:00,1:1s,2:30.4:45.7:00,9:30
Forced Vengeance
10,12:15, 2:30. 4:457:00.9:30
-MIDNIGHTS-
THE BEST LITTLE
WHOREHOUSE IN TEXAS 1200
DAWN OF THE DEAD 1130
BLADE RUNNER 1200
ROCKY HORROR 1200

FRI, MON-7:40, 9:55
SAT, SUN (R)
12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 9:55

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