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June 18, 1982 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-06-18

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fage 2-Friday, June 18, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Reagan ignores,
Soviet stance
o first strike

UNITED NATIONS (AP)-
President Reagan, ignoring the Soviet
Union's call to renounce the first use of
nuclear weapons, challenged Moscow
yesterday "to "deeds, not words" in a
mutual quest to curb the arms race.
In his first appearance before the
world organization, Reagan told the
Soviet Union to abandon "imperialist
adventures" and help forge arms
agreements that can be kept.
"OTHERWISE, we are building a
paper castle that will be blown away by
the winds of war," he said in a speech to
the U.N. General Assembly's special
session on disarmament. "Let me
repeat, we need deeds, not words, to
convince us of Soviet sincerity should
they choose to join us on this path."
Reagan did not mention an appeal by
Soviet President Leonid Brezhnev to
renounce the first use of nuclear
weapons that was delivered to the
session by Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko on Tuesday.
Gromyko sat stolidly through
Reagan's half-hour speech and did not
move when delegates applauded the
president.
REAGAN portrayed the United
States as the real champion of arms
control efforts since World War II and
accused the Soviets of a "record of
tyranny" that included violating
existing arms control pacts and the 1925
Geneva protocol banning the use of
chemical weapons.
In one of his sharpest attacks on
Soviet behavior yet, Reagan assailed
the Soviets for dominating Eastern
Europe, building the Berlin Wall and
supervising "the ruthless repression of
the proud people of Poland."
"Soviet-sponsored guerrillas and

Today
The weather
Partly sunny today with a chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Highs
will be in the upper 70s.
Pac-man on your back?
F YOU'RE A frustrated video game junkie, Megan Brians is teaching a
summer school class just for you. Granted, Megan is only nine-years-old,
but she's a master at such electronic diversions as Pac-man, Circus,
Warlords, and Night Driver. On June 22, Megan will teach a video game
seminar for players six through twelve at the Pullman Community Free
University in Washington state which is coordinated by her father, Paul. No
taller than a T.V. set, Megan's top score on the home version of Pac-man is
12,826, far surpassing her father. According to Paul Brians, Megan, an only
child, "likes to play games a lot" and video games give her the opportunity.
While Megan admits she takes longer than usual to play video games, she
does have a few tricks to teach her students. "If you want it even harder than
regular Pac-man, you put the television set on black and white," Megan ex-
plained. "Then you can't see if they are eatable or not."
Green, green concrete at home
F OR THOSE of you who are bored with summer lawn care chores,
Anthony Lo Russo of St. Louis, Mo. has arrived at a novel solution. Lo
Russo lhas paved his entire lawn with 6 inches of cement - with greenery
provided by a can of green paint. "Life's too short to bother with cutting
lawns," Lo Russo philosophizes. "It needs to be painted every two years this
way and I get about two paintings out of a can." Lo Russo finds his leisure
time has been vastly improved by dumping'concrete on his lawn. "It gives
me more time to do other thiogs," he said. "I like to fish, drink beer, and
relax ... I guess you'd call me sort of lazy." Lo Russo, obviously immune to
the splendours in the grass, doesn't miss his blades much. "If I want grass or
trees I can go to the park across the street," he said.
Happenings
Films
Cinema Guild- Top Hat, Lorch Hall, 7:30 p.m., On the Town, 9:30 p.m.,
Lorch.
Ann Arbor Film Coop- Cocaine Fiends, 7 p.m., Reefer Madness, 8:20
p.m., Sex Madness, 9:40 p.m., MLB 4.
Cinema II- Go West and Battling Butler, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Miscellaneous
University Reformed Church- Chinese Bible Class, 7:30 p.m.
Folk Dance Club- Folk Dance Instruction, 8 p.m., Michigan Union.
International Student Fellowship-meeting, 7 p.m., 4100 Nixon Rd.
Duplicate Bridge Club- Open game, 7:30 p.m., League.
To submit items for the Happenings'-Column, send them in cart of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
The Michigan Da1

neagan
... challenges Soviets to
'deeds, not words'
terrorists are at work in Central and
South America, in Africa, the Middle
East, in the Caribbean, and in Europe,
violating human rights and unnerving
the world with violence," he said.
"Communist atrocities in Southeast
Asia, Afghanistan and elsewhere con-
tinue to shock the free world as
refugees escape to tell of their horror."
The president repeated his ac-
cusation that the Soviets used chemical
weapons against insurgents in
Afghanistan and charged that Soviet
oppression of other lands paralleled the
stifling of a budding peace movement
at home.
"In Moscow," Reagan said, "banners
are scuttled, buttons are snatched and
demonstrators are arrested when even
a few people dare to speak out about
their fears."

00 out
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tcim'nn eneigte \n9o\
Other classeyoustaalaloecIn
Pi<keyxSlie.Ypilnti N
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Call .6wI
c18A erobc onc n In
Other classes available in:;
Brighton, Chelsea, Dexter, Howell, Manchester,
PinckneSalineYpsilanti

Vol. XCII, No. 32-S
Friday, June 18, 1982

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