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June 17, 1982 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1982-06-17

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The Michigan Daily

Vol. XCII, No. 31-S

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Thursday, June 17, 1982

Ten Cents

Twelve Pages

Lebanese
claim PLO
has ofere
tto end fight

From The Associated Press
Lebanese sources said yesterday that
the PLO, encircled by Israeli forces,
has offered to discuss laying down its
arms in west Beirut in exchange for
recognition by the United States, safe
conduct out of the city for its leaders,
and a role in negotiating the future of
the Palestinians.
Palestine Liberation Organization
spokesman Mahmoud Labadi,
however, called the reports "distorted"
and vowed: "We will never lay down
arms."
THE SOURCES, who refused to be
identified, said PLO leader Yasser
Arafat suggested the deal at a meeting
AP Photo earlier in the day with Lebanese Prime
bag Minister Shafik Wazzan. The reported
proposal envisions allowing the
t holding the bag when the puppy's Lebanese government to send in its
MORALE IS HIGH, DIRECTOR REPORTS

army to try to reestablish its control
over west Beirut, which has been
dominated by Palestinian and Syrian
forces for seven years.
Arafat's political adviser, Hani el-
Hassan, said the PLO also wants to talk
directly to the United States. "If the
Americans make a step to us,
everything can be discussed."
"The Palestinians are willing in .. .
direct talks with the United States to
discuss disarmament of their guerrillas
in Lebanon," Lebanon's state television
quoted el-Hassan as saying.
THE BROADCAST quoted El-Hassan
as saying U.S. presidential envoy Philip
Habib, now in Lebanon, should "offer
something to the PLO if he wants to
save Beirut. Direct talks could be a first
step."
See LEBANESE, Page 10

Doggie
Norm McCarthy of Selah, Wash. was lef
master went to have fun without them.

ILIR readies for review results
Dy - ~,s.. ss..A

By SCOTT STUCKAL

Although 25th anniversary
celebrations ended only last week, the
University's Institute for Labor and In-
dustrial Relations must now turn its at-
tention from past accomplishments to
an uncertain future. The institute
currently is awaiting results of a
budgetary review that may lead to
major funding cuts or complete
elimination.
The review, conducted by a subcom-
mittee of the Unitersity's Budget
Priorities Committee, is expected to be
completed by next week, according to
Engineering Prof. Joe Eisley, a sub-
committee member. The review com-
mittee's findings will help determine
the fate of ILIR's $300,000 budget.
DESPITE THE uncertainty of the
review's outcome, however, the in-
stitute's employees are not
discouraged, said ILIR Director
Malcolm Cohen. Letters received from
ILIR's supporters and positive respon-

'A lot of working class people would never have
the opportunity to step foot on campus if it
weren't for ILIR.' -Dorothy Jones,
former ILIR student

se elicited during public review
hearings held this spring have kept
morale at ILIR high, Cohen said.
The institute has received letters of
support from such prominent figures as
Ray Marshall, secretary of labor under
President Carter, Wilbur Cohen,
secretary of health, education and
welfare under President Johnson, as
well as Donald Reigle and Carl Levin,
Michigan's Democratic senators.
Last week, State Rep. Perry Bullard
(D-Ann Arbor) presented the institute
with a state legislative resolution in
recognition of the institute's
achievements.
THE REVIEW of ILIR is part of the

University's Five-Year Plan which will
reallocate $20 million from low priority
areas into those areas considered most
valuable. The review committees' fin-
dings will be given to the Budget
Priorities Committee and Vice-
President for Academic Affairs Billy
Frye, who will make the final decision
on budgets cuts.
Any plans for elimination of ILIR,
however, must be presented to the
University's Regents.
"Are there compelling reasons not to
close the ILIR?" is one of the questions
the administration has asked the
review committees to consider. ILIR
employees and supporters readily an-

swer this question with an emphatic
'yes'"
"MY PERCEPTION is that the in-
stitute is very highly regarded across
the nation and internationally," said
University of Alabama Prof. Trevor
Bain, head of Alabama's Human
Resources Institute.
Alabama's institute uses ILIR as a
model for studying labor problems,
Bains said.
The institute has conducted "very
good concrete applied research" into
employment problems, said Boston
College economics Prof. Barry
Bluestone, a former University student.
ILIR'S TWO main areas of research,
labor research and worker re-
education, are integrated, Cohen said.
ILIR filters the results of its labor
research into the worker re-education
program, headed by Prof. Hy Kor-
nbluh.
See BUDGETARY, Page 10

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