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June 09, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-06-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Britain must
take Stanley,
says Thatcher

FromtheAssociae dPre
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher
declared yesterday that British forces
must take the Falklands capital of St-
naley by force because the embattled
Argentine garrison has refused to
surrender.
The Buenos Aires junta vowed it will
not bend to British demands.
THATCHER told the House of Com-
mons in London her troops "will now
have to take by force" the last Argen-
tine stronghold because Buenos Aires
has not responded to appeals for
surrender and withdrawal.
Argentine fighter-bombers sank a
British frigate, destroyed a "large lan-
ding craft," and damaged two other
landing craft yesterday near Port Fit-
zroy on East Falkland island, Argen-
tine news agencies reported.
The official news agency Telam and
the privately owned agency DYN
quoted high military sources as saying
the damage was inflicted in two after-
noon raids from air bases in southern
Argentina.
At the same time, the Defense
Ministry in London said Britain now
has landed more than 9,000 troops on
the Falklands.
AS BRITISH military sources repor-
ted British 105mm guns shelled the
Argentine garrison in Stanley for the
seventh straight day. Thatcher said
there has been "no response what-
soever" from Buenos Aires to British
surrender pleas.
"If the will and the consent were
there, they only have to contact the
British commander in the field and the

withdrawal would be arranged before
battle," she said. "There is no obstacle
in the way of Argentine withdrawal ex-
cept the Argentines."
Argentine Foreign Minister Nicanor
Costa Mendez told reporters in Buenos
Aies that any further talks to stop the
fighting would require "a true British
desire to negotiate." So far, he said,
"Britain has been an emissary of
ultimatums and we not accept
ultimatums."
THEIR REMARKS heightened
speculation that the British comman-
der, marine Maj. Gen. Jeremy Moore,
will soon unleash his troops in an all-out
assault on the Argentine stronghold.
Weather is a crucial factor - it is win-
ter in the South Atlantic.
In a war-related-incident, the U.S.
Coast Guard in New York reported a
Liberian-registered supertanker had
radioed that it was bombed by a four-
engine plane 480 miles northeast of the
Falkland Islands. It said the tanker
Hercules, with a crew of 30 Italians, did
not report any casualties but said there
was some damage when the bomb from
the propeller-driven aircraft exploded
in the water after bouncing off the deck.
The tanker, believed to be carrying
ballast and not oil, reported it was
listing 6 degrees and heading for Brazil.
Argentina's official Telam news
agency quoted a military spokesman as
saying Argentina has no airplane
similar to the one described by the
tanker or "any other kind of bomber-
type aircraft capable of flying that
far."

Daily Photo by JAClt MLL
Presidential quarters
Where do Gerald Ford and other very important people stay when they come
to the University? Where else but the Inglis House, a collegiate version of
Camp David located on Highland Rd. Bordering the Arb, the University-
owned house and 9-acre garden provide a setting of quiet and decorum for
visiting VIPs.
Reagan salutes Brits
challenges Brezhnev
LONDON (AP) - To cries of "Hear, an unprecedented address boradcai
Hear!" from members of Parliament, from the Kremlin after a summi
President Reagan saluted Britain's meeting in Moscow in 1972. Brezhne
fighting force in the Falkland Islands was accorded the same privilege whe
yesterday and challenged Soviet he spoke from Nixon's San Clement
President Leonid Brezhnev to a "coin- Calif. home in 1973. Nixon spoke agai
petition of ideas and values" through an on Soviet radio and television after hi
exchange of television broadcasts. final Moscow summit in 1974.
Reagan, the first U.S. president to Reagan said democratic nations ha
address Parliament, also urged Israel been too shy to promote their strengths
to "bring its forces home" from "Let us be shy no longer," he said.
southern Lebanon, and denounced the "Let us go to our strength. Let us offe
terrorism that threatens war in the hope. Let us tell the world that a nev
Middle East. age is not only possible but probable."
THE PRESIDENT won cheers and He denied he was advocatin
applause from the audience in the "cultural imperialism" but said hi
Royal Gallery when he endorsed aim was to foster growth of suc
Britain's struggle to regain the democratic institutions as a free press
Falklands from Argentina. labor unions, political parties an
"Those young men aren't fighting for universities.
mere real estate," Reagan said. "They HIS LONG-TERM hope, he said, is tha
fight for a cause, for the belief that ar- democracy "will leave Marxism
med aggression must not be allowed to Leninism on the ash heap of history a
succeed and that people must par- it has left other tyrannies which stifl
ticipate in the decisions of government the freedom and muzzle the self e
under rule of law.' pression of the people."
Proposing a world wide campaign to
promote democratic institutions over About one-third of the membership o
totalitarianism, Reagan offered the House of Commons and the House o
Brezhnev "an opportunity to speak to Lords stayed away from Reagan
the American people on our television, speech in the Royal Gallery of th
if he will allow me the same opportunity Houses of Parliament, apparently in
with the Soviet people." display of dissatisfaction with h
SUCH AN exchange last occurred nuclear arms policy and conservativ
when then-President Nixon delivered politics.

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