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May 29, 1982 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

turday, May 29, 1982-The Michigan Daily

AP Photo
Unceremonious graduation
Michael Kaufmann, who has completed studies at the Fairview Park Nursery School in Cleveland, makes his
graduation this week less dignified by peeking at a classmate through his diploma.

Creative
students
meet at
'mind
olympics'
GLASSBORO, N.J. (AP) - Student
teams posing as space travelers from
the planet Om or early American In-
dians descended here yesterday to put
their brains to the test.
The Third Annual Olympics of the
Mind attracted more than 2,000 spec-
tators who came to watch elementary
and high school students grapple with
way-out problems dreamed up by two
professors.
TEAMS FROM Pennsylvania, New
York, Oklahoma, New Jersey, Ohio and
Arkansas placed first in various
divisions in five categories: Ear-
thquake Structure, the Cruppets, Strike
it Rich, Omonauts and Monsters.
The student teams had won local and
state competitions before advancing to
the finals here, where they struggled to
solve long-term problems distributed
last fall as well as problems handed out
at the last minute yesterday.
"Your team is from the planet Om,"
read the instructions for one long-term
problem. "The fivemembers of your
team have: been selected as the first
space explorers from Om. Therefore
they are Omonauts. Your mission is to
collect samples from the planet Earth,
which can be taken back to Om for
analysis.'
THE TASK WAS to design and builda
vehicle that could pick up objects
without the use of hand-held devices.
The vehicle could be powered only by a
12-volt car battery.
"It can pick up up to 10 pounds of any
type of material," said Dudington,
Mich., high school student David Har-
tung, 17, of his team's earth module,
which resembled a miniature antique
car with only three wheels.
"It has a syringe to pick up water, a
hook to pick up the balloon and two
dustpans to pick up everything else."
Hartung said. The thinking power
challenge was the brainchild of Drs.
Sam Micklus and Theodore Gourly.
F

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The Real Puzzle

The End

by Don Rubin
You know that you've
reached the end of a story in
Time Magazine when you
come to a little black square.
In fact, lots of periodicals use
this device, called an
endmark, to signal the conclu-
sion of their articles.
Of courae, squarea aren't
the only way. Money uses a
dollar sign and Playboy, not
surprisingly, its ubiquitous
rabbit.
Each of the literary stop
signs at the right represents
the end of a story in a maga-
zine listed below. We'd like
you to match them up.
Are you ready? On your
mark ... get set ... stop!
Fed up with these crazy
puzzles? Would you like to get
even with Don Rubin and win
$10 to boot? Then send your
original ideas for a Real Puz-
zle to this newspaper. All
entries will become property
of UFS, Inc. (You only win the
big bucks if we use your puz-
zle idea.)
LAST WEEK'S WINNER:
The chess puzzle stumped -
everyone last week, although
many noble efforts came
close. Send your completed
puzzle to The Michigan Daily,
420 Maynard,'Ann Arbor, MI,
48109 by Wednesday of next
week. One person will be
selected at random from the
correct entries to wina $10 gift
certificate courtesy of:

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1 18 19 4
21 22 23 9
ESQUIRE KICK
PERSONAL ILLUSTRATED
COMPUTING LIFE
HORTICULTURE FRETS
ALASKA ROCKY
OUTDOORS MOUNTAIN
BOOK DIGEST MAGAZINE
SKIER'S CAT FANCY
WORLD IRON HORSE
ELECTRONIC SOLDIER OF
GAMES FORTUNE
KEYBOARD

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2411
v

not studies
worry
students
(Continued from Page 5)
retired barber on Social Security, when
she finishes her exams in mid-June.
"I assume I'll get a job somewhere
but it probably won't be the job I want,"
said Onofri, who would like a job at a
local newspaper but would settle for
one in the fast food field. She figures she
will be about $8,000 in debt by the time
she graduates.
"I try to be optimistic about the
future," she said. "I'm pretty much
taking things as they come. I realize if I
stay here I'll be heavily in debt. It
doesn't look bright. But I want to go
here. I was accepted and will stay here
as long as I can."

0

4

WOODEN BOAT
PANORAMA
FIREHOUSE
THE SATURDAY
EVENING POST
GUITAR WORLD
DOG FANCY
WRITER'S
DIGEST
WATER SKI
FAMILIES

4

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