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May 27, 1982 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-05-27

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, May 27, 1982-Page 5
CALIFORNIA 'SEX CLASS' CONTROVERSY CONTINUES
Prof admits to sex with students

sexual liais
From AP andUPI insisted he
LONG BEACH, Calif. - The "Psych- let the affec
ology of Sex" professor who used to "Therea
give class credit for orgies and gay en- cluding t
counters admitted yesterday he has requireme
had sex with his students, but he says with me an
he no longer stays at parties where performan
students take their clothes off. not true."
Barry Singer, a tenured doctor of He alsos
psychology at California State Univer- where stud
sity-Long Beach, announced last week but he sai
he was dropping course credit for par- leave when
ticipation in non-marital sexual ex- "I'VEI
perimentation because of protests by they've ts
politicians and religious groups. there's bee
BUT HE SAID he would still allow said. "In
credit for such things as going in drag enough ...
to a gay bar, visiting nudist colonies, I'm goingt
divorce courts, marriage counselors or present."
encounter groups. A Cal
The school has backed Singer so far, enrolled in
saying the course need not be changed 53, touche
beyond his decision to drop credit for in on two s
taking part in sex. The university, Singer an
however, is reviewing the complaints students.
from groups off campus. "It has I
As a tenured faculty member, Singer that a stuc
could be fired only for such reasons as tically inv
moral turpitude or gross misconduct. happens, t
SINGER, 38, SAID that he has had formed,"
Sprenkel taA
(Continued from Page 3)
"We were all aware sometime ago that the
problems couldn't be solved," said councilmember
Leslie Morris (D-Second Ward). She said the
problems with the- city budget and the labor
negotiations were "the two biggest things recently,"
concerning Sprenkel's departure, but she said there
was also some difficulty with council members ad-
justing to Sprenkel's manner.
Hood termed the labor negotiations, which were
headed by Sprenkel, "a disaster," which gave the
city's unions more concessions than were necessary.
"For a city of our size, our policemen and firemen
are the best paid around," he said. "We've gone too
far. . . It ends up costing the city a lot of money."

ons with his students, but he
has never initiated them or
ct grades.
are all kinds of rumors, in-
that it's practically a
nt that students have sex
nd that I grade them on their
ce," Singer said. "That's
said he had attended parties
dents went naked or had sex,
id that from now on, he'll
such situations develop.
BEEN TO parties where
ken their clothes off and
en some sexual behavior," he
the past, I haven't left soon
My firm position now is that
to leave. I'm not going to be
State student who is not
the course, Betty Willman,
d off the review when she sat
essions and complained that
nounced he had sex with
happened three or four times
dent in my class was roman-
olved with me, and when that
the class is immediately in-
Singer told the newspaper.
ces leave,

APPhi
BARRY SINGER, California State University-Long Beach professor,
comments during a recent press conference on his "Psychology of Sex"
class, which drew national attention by offering credit for sex.
expected to resign

)oo

HE ADDED, "I don't mind Ann Arbor being a
leader, but there's a line over which we shouldn't
step."
But the vice president of Local 1733 of the Inter-
national Association of Firefighters said the city did
not give up that much in the negotiations. "I don't
think he (Sprenkel) made too many concessions. No
way," said fire fighter John Stewart. "We had to give
up in order to get. Actually, I don't think we got that
good a deal.. .All we got was an eight percent raise.
I think it was a disaster for our side, not for theirs."
Said Stewart: "It really doesn't matter to me
whether we get another one (city administrator) or
not. We see them come and we see them go."
NEITHER SPRENKEL nor Ann Arbor Mayor

Louis Be]
Hood p
found by
he said.
leave em
somebod
He cal
but said
for Spre
whether
tly, sine
sideratio
chosen,(
city gove

aa ; k
fi g0. A LI
* *
4 as
AP Photo
Hats off
Graduating seniors at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., turn their ceremony into a 1,000-hat salute yesterday
as they perform their traditional tossing of caps. A total of 1,030 cadets received diplomas.

lcher were availablefor comment.
redicted that a new administrator might be
fall. "I'm sure we'll have an active search,"
"That's not the type of position you like to
pty too long... .By October 1, we should hve
dy new on board."
fled Collins a "tremendous administrator"
it is "premature to call him a frontrunner"
nkel's position. He said it was not clear
Collins would want the position permamen-
e he had not submitted his name for con-
n the last time a city administrator was
even though he was involved in Ann Arbor
rnment at the time.
Researchers
study college
closings
(Continued from Page 3)
are being closed all over the country,"
he said.
HOWEVER,-HE added that there is
an offsetting factor: more people are
going to college who are between 25 and
45 years old. But that is not enough to
offset the difference, he said. "Experts
agree that the enrollment decline in the
next 20years will be about 15 percent."
Miller said the reason no other
studies have been conducted on this
subject is because it isn't discussed "in
polite circles. People don't talk about
(college closings) when people who
might be affected are around. As a
result, we know little about the process,
and if you don't know about the process,
you have problems intervening."
The study stresses the need for
colleges to be realistic about financial
problems and plan for the future. "A
number of small colleges have closed
on a moment's notice and its hurt
everyone involved," Miller said.
"Both the causes and effects need
further study," the researchers said.

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