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May 25, 1982 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-05-25

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Page 8-Tuesday, May 25, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Concerti played on original instruments
(Continued fromPage7)movement and lending an even more harpsichord, no violins are present. The elaborate cadenza in
what they deemed the simplest possible dance-like air to the final Menuet. baroque low strings had a tendency to movement. Michael Lyni
way dee te siple se This concerto introduced the audien- become less articulate and muddy in transverse flute playing
way and let it speak for itself. The use ce's ears to the curious phenomena of busier dialogues that even the exem- notable.
of original instruments can be condem- the baroque string tone and the baroque plary acoustics of St. Andrews could not The second half openedu
ned by the individual; the presentation oboe. Baroque string tone is less salvage. Many of the more difficult certo No. 4 in G major, B
of excitement and virtuosity cannot. resonant and brilliant than its modern runs, although executed with apparent lively concertino consist
The Brandenburg Concerti, day counterpart, but its more introver- ease, were also sabotaged by the in- recorders and violinist D
dedicated in 1721 to the Margrave of ted and melancholy sound has a sur- struments'lack of resonance. dominated the piece. Thet
Brandenburg, were composed at prising stridencysof its own. Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 tragedy of the recorder lin
Coethen and found their basis in the The baroque oboe, played lyrically by concluded the first half. Generally dante was relieved b
Italian concerto, but are imbued with Grant Moore, can best be described as regarded as the first keyboard concer- lighthearted Presto with
the rich counterpoint and varied tex- sounding at times like an injured duck to, the harpsichord takes on the roles of complex fugato.
ture that is characteristic of Bach. and at other times like a passable continuo, concertino, and soloist as the The Concerto No. 3 in G
The Concerto No. in F major, BWV imitation of its modern relative. Ap- work progresses. 1048, is the shortest of th4
parently the most capricious of the In this joyful work, harpsichordist perhaps the most odd. Limi
of a violino piccolo, a small violin tuned baroque winds, each half step sounds as Penelope Crawford presented the most orchestration and lacking
dumod and performed by Lyndon if it exists in a painful new world of its amazing performance of the afternoon. movement, possibly meant
Lawess, the group stood in true own. Her flawless virtuosity sparkled in all an improvisatory gesture
feshieincreasing theirytrue Concerto No. 6 in B flat major, BMV the roles that Bach presented her with, is derived from contrapun
baroque fashion, y 1051, is scored for lower strings and especially coming to life in the ment.

4

the first
n's pastoral
g was also
with the Con-
BWV 1049. A
ting of two
aniel Foster
understated
e in the An-
y the final
its spirited,
major, BMV
e group and
ited to string
g a middle
t by Bach as
, its interest
tal develop-

k CCOWR
Rob sGp
dR4fs Gar *
Te mlos t ulevmet.
beiflg yoU

The innocent first theme is transfor-
med into a complex texture of nine
voices, and ultimately all but forgotten
as new themes developed. The more
simple concluding Allegro was perfor-
med at a lightning fast speed by the en-
semble, which lost none of its accuracy
and accented the compelling rhythmic
activity.
The final work was the Concerto No. 2
in F major, BMV 1047, probably the
best known of the six. Scored for con-
certino quartet and strings, the Ars
Musica ensemble interpreted the
'tromba' as referring to the natural
horn instead of the more commonly
used trumpet.
A subject of much scholarly debate,
this performance was the, first to use
the natural horn and 18th century in-
struments in modern times. Natural
horn virtuoso Lowell Greer conquered
the difficult part that many trumpeters
have only attempted, and lost none of
the accustomed character in doing so.
His execution was spellbinding, com-
plemented nicely by the ensemble.
Presenting all six Brandenburg Con-
certi in one concert is a formidable
task, not to mention playing them well
on instruments of a decidedly
precarious nature. The Ars Musica en-
semble was successful, buoying a
delighted audience along in the
ebullient wake of the 18th century.
SANN AR BOR I
INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5t " tlbry 761-6700
HURRY ENDS THURSI
THE
WOMAN
NEXT
DOOR-
FR ANCOis4z
TRUFFAT
TUES-5:00, 7:00, 9:00 (R)
WED-12:50, 2:50, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
"It Rediscovers Language"
-GENE SISKE L
"A Unique Brilliant Film"
-ROGER EBERT
DINNER
WITH_
TUES-5:15, 7:20, 9:25
WED-12:55, 3:00, 5:15, 7:20, 9:25

4

,.

A GEORGE ROY HILL Film ROBIN WILLIAMS
"THE WORLD ACCORDING TO GARP" MARY BETH HURT
GLENN CLOSE- JOHN LITHGOW
Executive Producer PATRICK KELLEY Screenplay by STEVE TESICH
Based on the novel by JOHN IRVING Produced by GEORGE ROY HILL
and ROBERT LCRAWFORD Directed by GEORGE ROY HILL
A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY
R 1®987 Wamer os Al Pgns RPeeved
R oNOUN' Read the Novel from POCKET BOOKS.
LOCATION: AuditoriumA/Angell Hall
Univ. of Michigan/Ann Arbor
DATE: June 1
TIME: 7:00
SPONSOR: Dept. of Communications
Admission is free to the college community, but seating is limited.

4

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