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May 19, 1982 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-05-19

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The Michigan Daily
Vol. XCII, No. 11S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, May 19, 1982 Ten Cents Sixteen Pages
Bullard
drops bid
for onress

By BILL SPINDLE
With wire reports
State Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann Ar-
bor) announced yesterday that he is
pulling out of the race for the Second
District U.S. congressional seat.
Bullard expressed dissatisfaction
with the proposed new composition of
the Second District, which would be
solidly Republican under the redistric-
ting plan expected to be adopted by a
federal judicial panel sometime this
week.
"ANN ARBOR is clearly now a part
of a solidly Republican district,"
Bullard said last night.
Bullard said he felt Ann Arbor had
received "unfair" treatment from his
party's leaders, whom, he said had
"sold out."
"It's the state Democratic party that
sacrificed the district," he said.
BULLARD SAID he was considering
running for a seat in the state Senate, or
running for re-election for to his seat in
the state House of Representatives. He
said several factors could influence his
decision to run for a state Senate seat,
including whether a - favorably
Democratic Ann Arbor district would
be formed under a new legislative

reapportionment plan, and whether
Democrats could hold a majority in the
Senate.
Bullard said he hopes to have a
decision before the weekend so that a
congressional campaign fundraising
event can be changed to collect funds
for a new campaign.
The redistricting plan, expected to be
adopted by the weekend, would result in
a solidly Republican second district.
THE DISTRICT would include half of
Livonia, Plymouth, parts of Jackson,
Hillsdale and Lenawee counties and all
of Washtenaw county except Ypsilanti
and Saline.
A three-judge federal district court
panel had been expected to issue early
this week a decision on how Michigan's
congressional districts should be
revised. Instead, attorneys for the
state's Republican and Democratic
parties were abruptly called back into
court session in Detroit.
That session ended late Monday af-
ternoon and was scheduled to resume at
2:30 today.
"It is possible that the parties may
resolve something by then," an aide to
the court said.

Chil Daily Photo by ELIZABETH SCOTT
Two young members of a religious sect rest peacefully on the Diag yester-
day, looking puzzled amid the hustle and bustle of students making their
mad dash to class.

Jurors screened for Kelly trial

By GEORGE ADAMS
Prospective jurors for the trial of Leo
Kelly, a former University student ac-
cused of shooting two fellow students to
death in Bursley Hall last year, were
quizzed yesterday during the second
day of jury selection.
Washtenaw County Circuit Court
Judge Ross Campbell, Prosecuting At-
torney Lynwood Noah, and Defense At-
torney William Waterman yesterday
screened more than 30 possible jurors
about their knowledge of the case, their
attitudes toward psychiatrists and
psychologists, and their opinion of an
insanity defense, which Waterman
plans to use.
OF THE MORE than 100 prospective
jurors, only 16 are left to be questioned,
and all sides expect a jury will be
chosen today. If one isn't decided upon,
more jurors will have to be brought in.
The trial is scheduled to begin May 24.
All the jury candidates were
questioned as a group on Monday by
Campbell, who will preside over the

{:::.: .+.{.{ : . -. .
'This is probably the worst time in the history of
the United States to be forced to use the defense

of insanity. '
trial, regarding their attitudes about
the case, how much publicity they have
been exposed to concerning Kelly, and
any opinions on Kelly, psychology, and
the defense of insanity.
"I think the questions have been very
appropriate," Noah said, referring to
the screening. He also stated that Cam-
pbell's method of examining the jurors is
adequate and appropriate.
WATERMAN, however, said that
finding an impartial jury will be "next
to impossible." "I'm a little concerned
whether or not I can geta fair trial," he
said.

- William Waterman,
attorney for Leo Kelly
Waterman's concern stems from
what he sees as an unpopular attitude
among the public toward the idea of in-
sanity asa defense.
"This is probably the worst time in
the history of the United States to be
forced to use the defense of insanity,"
he said. "The specter of insanity and
people's attitudes about it are
everywhere, and publicity and
editorials make the problem worse.
You can't get around it," he said.
WATERMAN did not express discon-.
tent with the judge's manner of
questioning the jurors, but with the

much broader circumstances under
which the case must be tried. Asking
questions "can't purge someone of their
own personal bias," he said.
"I have an extra burden when I have
a juror who has skepticism of insanity
as a defense, even though he may be a
fair person otherwise," Waterman con-
tinued.
He said he was also displeased there
were no blacks on the jury so far, and
that he doesn't expect any will be ac-
cepted today. "If this jury is supposed
to be a cross section of the community,
Kelly's peers; then I think it needs
someone who can relate to the cultural
circumstances under which this in-
cident falls," he said.
Kelly is accused of the shooting
deaths of Douglas McGreenam, 21, a
senior art major from Caspian,
Michigan, and Edward Siwik, 19, a pre-
med freshman from Detroit.
McGreaham and Siwik were shot in
their Sixth Douglas Bursley hallway
last April17.

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