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May 14, 1982 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-05-14

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Page 10-Friday, May 14, 1982-The Michigan Daily
EL SALVADOR WAS 'BREAKING IN PIECES'
Duarte reflects on his presidency

I

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador
(AP)- Former President Jose
Napoleon Duarte said the two years he
was in power were a time of permanent
crisis and that the new administration
in El Salvador took over a country
"almost breaking in pieces."
"There were abuses by the military
all over the country," Duarte said in an
interview Tuesday. "We had a per-
manent crisis but we had reduced the
violence to certain levels by the time we
left office."
DUARTE, WHO assumed office in
1980, stepped down May 2 this year in
favor of Alvaro Magana, a U.S.-
educated economist and political in-
dependent chosen as provisional
president by the newly elected 60-seat
Constituent Assembly. Duarte's cen-
trist Christian Democrats won 24 seats
in the March 28 assembly elections. A
coalition of four rightist parties won. a
total of 36 seats. Leftists boycotted the
balloting.
Because no party emerged with a
clear majority, infighting among the
Christian Democrats and the rightists
almost tore the country apart during
April, Duarte said.
"That was the moment when the
country was almost breaking in
pieces," he said. "The army, too, was
splitting. That was the only time in this
country that there has been a complete
vacuum of power."
THE RIGHTISTS' combined power'

I
I

AP Photo
JOSE NAPOLEON DUARTE, former president of El Salvador, reflects on his country's March 28 elections during an
interivew this week. The inconclusive results of the vote, he said, had a devastating impact on the war-torn nation.

A

ena
kee
gov
D
Ma
of
Na

bled them to oust Duarte and to
p the more powerful posts in the new
vernment for themselves.
luarte's arch-foe, extreme rightist
j. Roberto DAubuisson, is speaker
the assembly and head of the
tionalist Republican Alliance.

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t

Magana, head of the national Duarte, a man without power; spends
mortgage bank for 17 years, was a his days.,now answering letters from
compromise choice for provisional friends and trying to arrange favors,
president. He will have less power than food or jobs for the barefoot poor who
the assembly, which is empowered to line the halls of party headquarters.
rewrite the 1962 constitution and call He indicated he will continue working
general elections. for the party and do what it wants him
"THIS IS A very difficult time for Mr. to do as far as running for further of-
Magana," Duarte said. fice.
Mexwican -students hold
o f 4 insects hostae
CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico (AP)- School director Rigoberto Delgado
Students holding their director hostage Perez, who has been held in his office
along with 15 million crop-saving insect for three days by an estimated 2,000
larvae threatened yesterday to burn students, said the students would burn
two trucks unless the government the government pickup trucks if they
guaranteed more money for the school. did not geta response from the Mexican
agriculture department by evening.
"I'M UPSET about it," said Delgado.
"I don't see any reason for this."
The protesters took over the Her-
manos Escobar agriculture school on
the outskirts of Juarez and an insect
laboratory in Zaragosa, six miles away,
on Tuesday. Agriculture offices in
downtown Juarez were taken over
Wednesday and students used buses to
block busy downtown streets around
the offices.
The students say Mexico's secretary
p of agriculture reneged on a promise
that would have meant nearly $5
million in additional funds for the
school.
DELGADO SAID the most serious
threat waslto 15 million insect larvae in
the laboratory. The students threatened
to turn,off the insects' life support
systems if their demands were not met.
'S The insects are raised in the
laboratory and then released to devour
boll weevils that would damage the
area's cotton crop. If the students
CK ETScarried through on their threat to
C .~.destroy the predator insects, it could
cost farmers millions of dollars,
Delgado said.
V E "I don't think they'll pull the plug on
the insects as long as progress is being
iness hours (9 a.m.) made," he said. "A leader of the far-
mers spoke to the students today and
CONTEST TO ENTER! told them they would lose the sympathy
of thepeople if they do not Iiberat
these-predatorinsects

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If You Find Your Name in Today'
Michigan Daily Classified Page
YOU WIN TWO FREE TI
To Any One Of
STATE 1-2-3-4 MIDNIGHT
If your name appears, come to the Daily during our bus
5 pm), 420 Maynard, within 48 hours.
NO

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