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July 11, 1981 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1981-07-11

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Page 4-Saturday, July11; 1981-The Michigan Daily
London rocked by
looting and rioting

1

LONDON (AP)-Rioting and looting
turned much of London into a bat-
tleground last night, and the week-long
rash of urban violence spread to six
provincialicities.
London appeared to be hardest hit.
Anxious messages from the trouble
spots crackled on police radios. Police
said gangs of black, Asian and white
youths were on the rampage, throwing
gasoline bombs, burning cars and
buildings, stoning the police, smashing
shop windows and fighting among
themselves.
Home Secretary William Whitelaw
signed an order banning demon-
strations in greater London for a month
in a bid to restore order.
Scotland Yard reported 231 arrests
and more than 40 officers injured in
London just after midnight.
Rioting erupted for the first time in
the northern industrial cities of Bir-
mingham, Ellesmere Port, Hull,
Newcastle and Preston, and broke out
again in Liverpool, where riots last
Sunday night were England's worst in
200 years.
On the eighth straight night of urban
violence, Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher said the nation had witnesaed
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"terrorism and criminal looting and
thuggery." She spoke of the fragility of
Britain's democracy in the face of the
riots.
"The veneer of civilization is very
thin. It has to be cherished if it is to con-
tinue,' Mrs. Thatcher told a
parliamentary reporters' dinner in
London.
The London fire brigade said its
engines were attacked as they an-
swered calls to street fires. In two Lon-
don districts, Southall and Battersea,
engines were removed fr6m their
stations after mobs attacked them and
their crews.
In the provincial cities, officials said
violence was mostly in city centers,
with window smashing, looting and at-
tacks on police, who were out in force
with riot shields.
Former
Daily
editor
dead
at 37
Kay Holmes, a University graduate
and former Culture Editor for The
Michigan Daily, died of cancer Thur-
sday night in Manhattan. She was 37.
A journalist and former United
Nations Information Officer, Holmes
was a native of Warren, Michigan. She
graduated from the University in 1965;
and worked on the Daily from 1962-1964.
She was also a frequent contributor to
the Detroit News' weekly magazine,
writing many cover stories.
HOLMES, THE wife of Peter Seares,
a senior editor at Reuters News Agency
in New York, spent six years in
England as a journalist. Upon her
return to the United States in 1972, she
began a free-lance journalist career,
contributing to numerous publications.
The Seares lived in Brooklyn, New
York with their daughter Carrie, 4. She
is also survived by her mother, Enace
Holmes of Warren and her sister
Margaret Woodford of St. Clair Shores,
Michigan.
Q - cont,,Ixted bvth9p*I*h '

In Brief
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
46 bodies found in Salvador
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador - Forty-six bodies, many showing signs of
torture, were discovered in shallow graves at Chalatenango, the government
said yesterday. An official who was at the site described the killings as "a
horrible massacre."
The official, who requested anonymity, said an investigation indicated
many of the victims were pulled from their homes Wednesday night, ap-
parently by right-wing extremists looking for leftists and leftist sym-
pathizers.
THE BODIES FOUND at Chalatenango, about 40 miles north of San
Salvador, were among 60 discovered in this strife-torn nation during a 24-
hour period, the government said.
Eight bodies with bullet wounds were found in Nejapa, 14 miles north of
the capital, the army said.
Baptist minister agrees
to discontinue shocks
GRAND RAPIDS-A Baptist minister says he will stop shocking Bible
school students with a 12-volt battery to teach them to listen to God, Kent
County's prosecuting attorney said yesterday.
Prosecutor David Sawyer said the Rev. Dwight Wymer agreed to discon-
tinue the attention-grabbing Bible school stunt after learning criminal
charges could be brought against him ifa child suffered an injury in connec-
tion with'the shocks.
Kent County Prosecutor David Sawyer said yesterday that Michigan law
is vague about the legality of the shocks, since the children volunteered and
it wasn't used for disciplinary purposes.
"But we're certainly concerned," he said. "I've talked with electrical ex-
perts and they say that with a transformer coil, those kids are getting hit
with a higher voltage than six volts.
"If one of those children had a birth defect or if the voltage was high
enough, we could have cardiac arrest and that might result in death. Then
we havea case of involuntary manslaughter."
Religious leaders of various denominations yesterday said they were
alarmed at a Baptist minister's use of electric shocks to teach the wrath of
God to children in Bible school.
Complimentary maybe, but
this whistle could be a crime
EAST LANSING-Scott Marks thought his "wolf whistle" was a com-
pliment, but it may turn out to beoa crime.
The 18-year-old East Lansing man was riding through town with a friend
earlier this week when he spotted an attractive young woman and let loose
with a loud whistle to show his appreciation.
The next thing he knew, the car was being pulled over by East Lansing
Patrolman Len Wells who cited him for violating the city's noise ordinance
and making an offensive sound-a misdemeanor.
Many walkers and joggers have complained about harassment and "it just
occured to me that the ordinance should be enforced," he said.
The noise ordinance violation carries a fine of up to $25.
The other charge-under an ordinance which makes it illegal to "accost,
molest or otherwise annoy" by tough, word of mouth or gesture-carries a
maximum fine of $100 or 90 days in jail.
State travel officials say this
could be record year
LANSING-It may be too soon to break out the champagne, but Michigan
travel industry officials-said yesterday early indications show 1981 could be
a record year for tourism in the state.
Residents of bordering states are flocking to Michigan in droves and those
who already live here are taking their vacation trips close to home, both the
state Travel Bureau and the Auto Club of Michigan reported.
The state's 10 percent increase in Fourth of July holiday travel is a good
indication the remainder of the summer will be good for the tourist trade,
one of the state's top industries, said Jerry Cheste, a spokesman for the Auto
Club.
Murder charge reversed
on technical grounds
LANSING-The Michigan Court of Appeals yesterday reversed, on
technical grounds, a woman's manslaughter conviction in the shotgun
slaying of a live-in boyfriend who allegedly beat her when she failed to give
him money.
Jacqueline McDonald testified in the Wayne County case that the
boyfriend began demanding money shortly after moving in with her and got
violent when she could not or would not come across with money. After
several assaults, Ms. McDonald said, sh asked him to leave, but he retur-
ned a short time later and beather regularly.

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