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June 19, 1981 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1981-06-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Senate kills nuclear
waste transport bill

LANSING (UPI) - The Senate effec-
tively killed yesterday a bill which
would have stiffly regulated a planned
shipment of radioactive waste across
the Mackinac Bridge.
On a 23-10 vote, the Senate sent the
measure to the Upper Peninsula In-
dustrial and Economic Affairs Commit-
tee - a group which has not met in its
nearly three years of existence and
probably will not meet on the bill.
THE BILL needed Senate approval
yesterday if it was to receive final
passage before the legislature recesses
for the summer July 1.
The Nuclear Assurance Corp. of
Atlanta has proposed sending six
truckloads of atomic waste through
Michigan sometime before July 31. The
spent nuclear fuel rods from Canada's
Chalk River reactor would travel into
the state at Sault Ste. Marie, across the
"Big Mac" Bridge and down Interstate
75 to a storage center in Aiken, S.C.
Gov. William Milliken is awaiting a
response from the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission to his questions concer-
ning the safety of the shipments.

A SPOKESMAN said there had been
no word from the NRC yesterday, but
he still is anticipating a response this
week.
Michigan utilities were concerned the
bridge restrictions would have ended
their own shipments of nuclear plant
waste to out of state storage facilities,
he said.
"They're ducking the issue," Irwin
said.
He said the legislature has no time to
act on a bill dealing with the pending
shipment. He will work now toward a
comprehensive set of laws on nuclear
shipments.
INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ave .b ,'W 761.6700
FRIDAY 7:15& 9:35
SAT & SUN 12:05, 2:25, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35
CHRISTOPHER
REEVES
UPRMAN
T H E A D V E N T U R E
CONTINUES

s uper ipetter A"'"""
12-year-old Jason Johnson of St. Joseph, Michigan proudly presents the
House resolution which he was awarded yesterday at the state Capitol.
Jason was honored for his runner-up finish ina national spelling bee.

Air controllers may strike Monday

WASHINGTON (UPI) - The gover-
nment yesterday established emergen-
cy plans for a threatened nationwide air
traffic controllers strike Monday, but
the union offered not to strike if
President Reagan would back pay-
raise legislation.
Federal Aviation Administration
chief J. Lynn Helms told Congress the
FAA will meet any time with the
Professional Air Traffic Controllers
Organization, but the union said no new
talks are scheduled.
THE WHITE House said an "illegal
strike" will not be tolerated.
ALthough there was no movement in
negotiations, PATCO announced late
yesterday it would sign a new contract
in return for White House endorsement
of amended legislation to be introduced
in Congress today.
The union said Rep. William Clay,
(D-Mo.), will sponsor a revised bill in
the House, permitting a top base pay of
$59,200 instead of the $73,400 in the
original Clay bill.
MICHIGAN
REPERTORY
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JUNE 17, 18. 19, 20
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POWER CENTER-
8:00 p.m.
PLUS..,
Three Defier Revue
PTP Ticket Office, MI League
764-0450
Power Center Ticket Office
opens at 6:00 p.m. 763-3333

THE NEW legislation also would
eliminate a "productivity bonus" to
boost pay still further, and would scale
back cost-of-living raises while
retaining provisions for a 32-hour, four-
day work week.
As Civil Service employees, con-
trollers now get from $20,000 to $50,000
for a 40-hour week. The contract largely
covers working conditions.
"If this bill gets White House
backing, they will sign the contract,"
said PATCO spokesman David Trick.
"I HAVE to ... assume there will be
some kind of strike action," FAA Ad-
ministrator J. Helms told a
congressional subcommittee. A federal
judge in New York City, meanwhile,
said the controllers' complaints about

being underpaid are "no excuse for
violation of the law" and refused to lift
an injunction barring a work slowdown
or strike.
A walkout could take out as much as
85 percent of the workforce, but the
FAA has worked out contingency plans
to handle about half of the normal
commercial traffic and perhaps 25 per-
cent of traffic overall.

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(K

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