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June 09, 1981 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1981-06-09

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, June 9, 1981-Page 9
New Beirut cease-fire reported

BEITEDDIN, Lebanon (AP) - Arab media
announced yesterday that Christian militias
Syrian forces had agreed to a new cease-fire in
torn Lebanon, but a communique did not mention
clear-cut arrangements to halt the fighting.
The latest cease-fire came as the Arab world wa
an uproar over the attack by Israeli warplanes o
Iraqi nuclear reactor near Baghdad, and U.S. en
Philip Habib resumed his shuttle diplomacy to tr
avert an Israeli-Syrian showdown over Syrian a
aircraft missiles in Lebanon.
A CHRISTIAN radio station, Voice of Leban
immediately challenged the validity of the cease-f
It said that just before the cease-fire was announ
Syrians again began shelling the besieged Chris
city of Zahle in eastern Lebanon.
Lebanese police in Beirut said they had no con
mation of the report of renewed shelling after a t
day lull in Zahle and Beirut, but a number of ear
Noise law,
energy plan
proposed in
City Council
discussion
(Continued from Page 3)
words" between 9 p.m. and a a.m.
" the creation of "a loud unnecessary
noise in connection with the loading or
unloading of any vehicle or the opening
and closing or destruction of bales,
boxes, crates, or other containers."
" "yelling, shouting, whistling, loud
talking, or singing on the public streets,
particularly between 10 p.m. and 7
a.m., or at any other time or place so as
to annoy or disturb the quiet comfort or
repose of persons in any office,
dwelling, hotel, or any other type of
residence or of any persons in the
vicinity."
The proposed law does provide for
exemptions to the code, but they must
be specifically granted by council or the
city administrator. According to the
city attorney's office, the new vehicular
sound levels are already state law, but
are being added to the ordinance so
they can be enforced as city laws.
IN ADDITION, the proposal spells
out specific "decibel limits" for
measuring the sound emitted. The
police could then measure the sound
levels by way of a "decibel meter."
In other council news, the Ann Arbor
Energy Steering Committee presented
their final recommendations to the city,
outlining a comprehensive energy
program.
Presentations included Transpor-
tation and Land Use, Building Retrofit,
Renewable Resources, New Construc-
tion and Site Design, and Education and
Promotion.
The steering committee goal was "to
increase energy efficiency and use of
renewable resources in existing and
new construction, transportation, land
use, municipal operations, and other
applicable operations and facilities
through appropriate policies and
programs, while maintaining the at-
tractiveness of Ann Arbor as a place to
live and do business," said University
Prof. John Clark, committee chairman.

tors
and
war-
any
is in
n an
voy
y to
inti-
non,
fire.
ced,
tian
nfir-
two-
lier

cease-fires were quickly broken.
Habib, who spent three weeks last month in the
Mideast ina move to avoid a clash between Syria and
Israel over the Syrian missiles, left Paris yesterday
for another round. U.S. officials declined to give his
destination, but Arab reports said he was going first
to Saudi Arabia.
A CEASE-FIRE between the Lebanese Christians
-and Syrian troops in Lebanon was considered crucial
to Habib's diplomacy, but the Israeli attack on the
Iraqi reactor overshadowed the American's mission
and the developments here.
The cease-fire announcement said the foreign
ministers of Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Kuwait, after
three days of meetings with Lebanese government
and militia leaders, "record that all parties involved
have pledged to abide by a cease-fire on Lebanon's
entire territory."
But the communique indicated that the conferees

at this mountain resort town 19 miles southeast of
Beirut had failed to reach a comprehensive
agreement. It said they agreed to hold two more
meetings to decide on further steps to end the
hostilities.
IT REPORTED THAT the three foreign ministers,
Prince Saud al-Faisal of Saudi Arabia, Abdul-Halim
Khaddam of Syria, and Sheik Sabah al-Sabah of
Kuwait, would meet in Saudi Arabia June 23 to
prepare for a full conference on July 4 that would in-
clude Lebanon's Christian president, Elias Sarkis,
and Moslem Prime Minister, Shafik Wazzan.
Fighting between the right-wing Christian militias
and units of Syria's 22,000-man force in Lebanon
erupted April 1, and has claimed at least 644
Lebanese lives. Syria has not revealed its casualties
in the fighting that was broken off on several oc-
casions by cease-fire agreements that failed.

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