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June 05, 1981 - Image 30

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1981-06-05

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Page 14-Friday, June 5, 1981-The Michigan Daily
CITY VIBRA TES WIT H ENERGY
Detroit for weekend trip

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(Continued from Page 7)
south of the border flavor, the Mexican
Village area is worth exploring.
Located on the near southwest side of
the city, close to Tiger Stadium, the
Village offers a collection of nightclubs,
restaurants, and shops (botanica's).
MEXICAN VILLAGE Restaurant is
moderately priced, and tacos, en-
chiladas, as well as full course Mexican
dinners are the main entrees. For the
experienced or daring, it also offers a
diverse selection of Mexican beers and
cocktails.
If it's nightspots you want, Detroit
has-everything from R&B to New
Wave, with low-priced cover charges,
or no cover at all.
Union Street (located on Woodward
near downtown) has classical guitar
music in a rustic atmosphere. The Soup
Kitchen Saloon (on Franklin, also near
downtown) is popular with students,
and offers live jazz and blues circuit
bands and moderately priced drinks.
Alvin's Twilight Bar (on Cass) is
rather higher priced, featuring jazz
with the most popular groups, and oc-
casionally reggae and other types of
music. The Gnome (on Woodward)
specializes in middle-eastern food with
live local entertainment.
FOR A CHANGE of pace, the Old
Detroit (on Beaubien) has an old time
piano bar on Friday and Saturday
nights, complete with a sing-along and
choice ground round hamburgers.
T. J. & Snug is a favorite among the
after-theatre crowd for its soups, salads .
and casseroles.
And the New Wave bars can't be
overlooked. 'Bookie's Club 870 (on Mc-
Nichols) is easily Detroit's New Wave
Palace. Appropriate dress is suggested,
Ph ato ns
c ommercaPhotofiishing)
HOUR
Ektachrome
SLIDE
Processing
On the Hour 10 to 3
Weekdays at
3180 Packard Only
Regular Prices!
4 Hour Service at
691 So. Maple and
1315 So. University
In by 9 or 1

FOR BASEBALL FANS, Tiger Stadium is just a few blocks from the Amtrak Termina

and an entertaining evening is guaran-
teed.
The Aorta (also on McNichols) is also
popular with New Wave Rockers. It is
less expensive, and a hit with students.
THE MORE CULTURALLY attuned
will also find plenty to keep them oc-
cupied in the city. Highlights include:
. a world-class symphony orchestra,
with regular performances at Ford
Audirorium
" the Michigan Opera Theatre,
presenting five major productions each
year
" the Detroit Institute of Arts, which
features national traveling exhibits,
foreign film theatre, a collection of an-
cient middle-east pottery, and yes,
Egyptian mummies
" the Detroit Historical Museum, for
a definitive history of the city
" the Detroit Public Library, noted
for its ancient book collection and ex-
tensive rare book room
* the Wayne State University
Cultural Area
" the Fisher Theatre, which offers
the best in Broadway shows at
moderate prices (students can receive
discounts for most shows)
" the Detroit Science Center, with one

of the few "hands-on" exhibit museums
in the U.S.
" the Music Hall which has dance,
opera, orchestral, and mime groups on
an annual basis
" Fort Wayne, built on the Detroit
Riverfront during the 1840s and now
restored to its original appearance, of-
fering a step back in time
" the Stroh's Brewery, a must for
beer lovers, and tours end with free
beer and snacks
* Belle Isle Park, an island in the
Detroit River, a great picknicking area
with a zoo, stables, soccer field, canoe
livery, and the Dossin Great Lakes
Museum
IN ADDITION, beer loving baseball
fans might want to catch a game at
Tiger Stadium on Michigan Ave. about
five blocks from the old, large Penn
Station Amtrak terminal.
For an "international experience,"
Windsor, Canada lies directly across
the river from Detroit and is easily
reached by the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel
or the Ambassador Bridge. The Detroit-
Windsor port authority also operates
daily and weekend bus service from
downtown.
Overpowering the skyline of Detroit

as viewed from Windsor is the
Renaissance Center-thesymbol of the
city's rebirth. This -architectural
masterpiece contains stores, a hotel, a
post office, office space, and 13
restaurants-including a revolving
restaurant on the 70th floor that offers a
breath-taking view of the city, and even
of Windsor.
On the way back to Ann Arbor, the
traveler can stop in Dearborn to see the
world-famous Henry Ford Museum and
Greenfield Village, to relive yester-
day's important moments through a
vast variety of historical exhibits.
TO THOSE UNFAMILIAR with the
city, Detroit is divided into east and
west sides by Woodward Avenue
(Route 1) which leads right into the
heart of the downtown riverfront area.
Once inside the city, the public tran-
sportation is very good with most bus
lines operating 24 hours a day at a cost
of 60ยข a ride. The city also recently
renovated an open double deck trolley,
the only one of its kind operating in the
world.
Detroit is readily accessible to Ann
Arbor by either train, bus, or car. Am-
trak has daily service to and from the
city at about $10 (with a sizeable reduc-
tion for those who travel during off peak
hours). Greyhound offers around-the-
clock service; and Detroit is about 40
miles east of Ann Arbor on Interstate 94
by car.
Action Sposwear
FACTORY
CLOSEOUTS
Swimwear,
Footwear,
Bodywear
406 E. Liberty
2 blocks off State St.

SPEND YOUR SUMMER AT THE
oec
lo- ostc
JO l~tCass
350 SOUTH FIFTH AVENUE
663-0536

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