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June 04, 1981 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1981-06-04

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Page-=Thu'rsday, Jvhe, 1981-The MlkhigonDily

4

Isr ael
commits
warplanes
to support
Christians

BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP)-Heavy Syrian-Chriatian
fighting erupted anew yesterday in Zahle, 30 miles
east of Beirut, and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin said that Israeli warplanes were committed to
help the Christians against the Syrian air force in
Lebanon.
Sporadic shelling was reported in Beirut's eastern
suburb of Hadass near President Elias Sarkis'
residence at Baabda, and sniping continued across
the line dividing the Moslem and Christian halves of
the capital.
ISRAELI GUNBOATS shelled a Palestinian base in
northern Lebanon. The Palestine Liberation
Organization said the gunboats opened fire on the
Nahr el-jbared refugee camp near Tripoli, 60 miles
north of Beirut.
Guerrilla shore batteries returned fire but neither
side reported any casualties as a result of the 90-
minute exchange. Israel's command said its forces
were aiming at the regional command of the Popular
Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a Marxist fac-
tion.

In Jerusalem, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin said he sent an emissary to tell the Lebanese
Christians in April that if they were attacked by the
Syrian air force, "we will help you with our air for-
ce."
HE MADE THE statement in Parliament, where
parties opposed to Begin's coalition in the June 30
legislative election accused him of making
"dangerous" commitments to Israel's Christian
allies in Lebanon.
Israeli jets downed two Syrian helicopter gunships
attacking Zahle April 28, and the next day Syria
deployed surface-to-air missiles in the area. Israel
demanded they be removed but Syria refused.
Meanwhile, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat will hold
a one-day summit in Israeli occupied Ofira today,
with the Israel-Syria crisis over Lebanon at the top of
their agenda.
IT IS THE first meeting in the past 17 months of
chilly but correct relations between the two coun-
tries.

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EFFECTS OF CONSERVATIVE SHIFT SUPERFICIAL:
Public opinion uncha-nged

NEW YORK (AP) - Americans'
views on social issues such as abortion,
busing and homosexual rights have.
changed little despite last year's con-
servative swing that put Republicans in
the White House and in control of the
U.S. Senate, an Associated Press-NBC
News poll shows.
The public's views on most of those
issues that are so important to many
conservative individuals and groups
have not, in fact, changed much at all in
recent years.
ONLY ATTITUDES on the proposed
Equal Rights Amendment have shifted.
But even in this case, the shift has not
been a growing opposition to the ERA,
but shift from supporting the amen-
dment to being uncertain about it.
The social issues have taken on a new

importance in light of Reagan's elec-
tion and the Republicans control of the
Senate. Conservative groups that con-
centrate on these issues have hoped
that the new lineup in Washington will
lead to quick adoption of their views as
national policy.
BUT REAGAN'S advisers and some
Republican senators have said they.
hope to deal with the nation's economic
issues first, delaying any actions on
social issues until next year.
About three-quarters of the public -
76 percent - opposes busing of public
school children for the purpose of
' desegregation, while 18 percent support
it. That's not much different from the
findings of AP-NBC News polls since
1977. For example, in June 1978, the
figures were 72 percent opposed and 20

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percent in favor.
Conversely, 75 percent of those
questioned in the latest poll said that
the decision to have an abortion should
be left to a woman and her doctor.
Twenty-one percent disagreed.
AGAIN, THESE figures do not show
.much change from past polls. In
January 1980, the poll said 76 percent
favored the pro-abortion position and 20
percent opposed it.
On another social issue -
homosexual rights - the opinion
changes have been small. Forty-eight
percent favor extending laws protec-
ting equal job and housing oppor-
tunities to homosexuals, with 38 percent
opposed. That's little changed from the
October 1978 poll.
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