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May 27, 1981 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1981-05-27

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TheMichigan Daily-Wednesday, May 27, 1981-Page 5

plagued
by booking
problems
(Continued from Page 3)
tickets for a given concert; two percent
of Detroit is considerably larger than
two percent of Ann Arbor. Translation:
The artists can often make more money
by playing in Detroit.
This is especially true of black ar-
tists. MEO has come under attack
several times for not booking black ar-
tists. Young says they try to, but any
show MEO books has to be within its
economic reach. That is, they cannot
afford to lose too much money.
FURTHERMORE, many artists
have certain markets they feel are im-
portant to their careers. Consequently,
the richness of Detroit's musical
history draws many bands there
repeatedly.
If a concert is scheduled in Detroit, it
probably will not be scheduled in Ann
Arbor, for economic and contractual
reasons. The latter involves the usual
"90 days, 90 miles" rule of
booking-performers are often not
allowed by contract to play within 90
miles of a city within 90 days.
Sometimes this restriction is waived, as
it was when Bruce Springsteen played
in both Ann Arbor and Detroit last Oc-
tober.
Ann Arbor does, of course, have its
advantages. Some artists have stronger
followings among the college crowd
than they do in a more general
population. Furthermore, Young says
artists very often leave college cam-
puses angry with the promoters. That
does not happen here, Young says,
because the staff is a professional
rather than student one; consequently
Ann Arbor has a good reputation among
the bands.
If MEO makes money, the profits go
back into the price of tickets. Tickets
for the Detroit Bruce Springsteen con-
cert, for instance, cost $10.00 and $12.50
apiece. The Ann Arbor show cost $8.50
and $10.00.
It was unclear at press time whether
MEO broke even in 1980-81, since the
total cost of overhead had not been
determined. Young said the year was
the leanest MEO has had so far, even
though it sold out more concerts than it
ever has. The problem, she says, is that
there weren't enough concerts to
produce the revenue needed to cover
costs.
EVEN SELL-OUTS have their
problems. Ask anyone who stood in line
all night for Bruce Springsteen tickets,
only to get seats high up in the gold tier.
The whole experience brought on a bit
of an uproar-Springsteen apologized
on stage-but Young says there is no
better way to sell tickets for shows so
heavily indemand.
Selling tickets by mail, she says, is
expensive, and check-in systems
discriminate against out-of-towners.
Young insists there is no way to prevent
people from standing in long lines with-
out inviting worse problems.
A parting word to the wise: Tickets to
MEG concerts are sold at Crisler, the
MEO box office, and other local outlets,
but none of these outlets has better
tickets than the others. The tickets are
evenly distributed by a computer and
printed on the spot. No matter where
you buy the ticket, it is first-come, first-
served.

Oatsmobile
Spook the Shetland pony gets a free ride in the back seat of the family car. The pony and his owner, Carol Inglis of
Richmond, Indiana, were on their way to an instructional riding program for the handicapped.

ONE-PIECE SUIT LOOKING HIGH AND LOW FOR MISS J!
An '82 look: cut low in the back and high on the sides; contrasting
colors meeting in puckers down the front. All in a stretching fit of
nylon/spandex with adjustable criss-cross straps. By Sassafras in an
even split of black/white or fuchsia/white. For sizes 5 to 13, $25.
Terry beach bag of lined white cotton with multiple pockets, $23.
Jacobsons
OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 900 P.M.

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