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May 06, 1981 - Image 15

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1981-05-06

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, May 6, 1981-Page 15
A closer look at contact lenses

By DOUG NEWMAN
The trend toward contact lenses is
one fad that, not surprisingly, has gone
unnoticed. For millions of Americans,
putting little bits of plastic into their
eyes is as much a part of the daily
routine as brushing their teeth.
According to Ann Arbor optometrist
Dr. Jerry Schleicher, about 115 million
Americans need some form of vision
correction, and of those, between 20 and
40 million wear contact lenses.
In Ann Arbor, the number of people
who purchased contact lenses within
the past five years is "unbelievable,"
according to Church Street Optometrist
Dr. Paul Uslan.
Uslan said he has sold 5,000 pairs of
Ford
Cabinet
dedicates
library
at 'U'
(Continuedfrom Page 10)
* joked and engaged in a little self-
congratulation, praising the accom-
plishments of their administration.
During the meeting, the Cabinet mem-
bers outlined as their greatest
achievement uniting Americans after
the turbulence of the Vietnam War and
the Watergate investigations.
The cabinet meeting was the
culmination of two days of activities
and ceremonies held to commemorate
the Ford library. Early on April 27,
Ford, sporting a fresh California tan,
led a tour of the library for members of
the press. During the tour, Ford an-
swered questions ranging from the
feasibility of President Reagan's
economic package to the implications
of the lifting of the grain embargo
against the Soviet Union.
Other officials who attended the
ceremonies included former treasury
secretary William Simon, former
commerce secretary Elliot Richar-
dson, former attorney general Edward
Levi, Ford's press secretary Ron
Nissen, Arthur Burns, former chair-
man of the Federal Reserve Board and
adviser to the president, and several
other cabinet members.
THE TWO STORY brick and bronze
glass library will house the documents
and official papers of Ford's long
political career, from his 13 terms in
Congress to his 30 months in the White
House. Located next to the Bentley
Historical Library on North Campus,
the library will be used primarily by
historians and researchers interested
in the Ford administration. Ford said
he plans to visit the library three to five
times a year.
The construction of the library was
financed by a nationwide fundraising
campaign and, although it is owned by
the University, will be operated by the
National Archives and Records Ser-
vice.
This story was compiled from
files by Daily staff writers Lorenzo
Benet and Kevin Tottis. The story
was written by David Meyer.

contact lenses since he began business
in 1973. Although he began as a general
practitioner, Uslan said he now deals
primarily in contact lenses because the
market is good in Ann Arbor. He says
students comprise 95 percent of his
business.
Most eye experts say they are not
surprised with the recent influx in con-
tact lens wear. "In the past eight years,
the progress of contact lens technology
has been unbelievable. There are bet-
ween five and ten times as many
manufacturers as there were eight
years ago, Uslan said.
The first contact lens was made of a
hard plastic material and appeared on
the market in the 1940s. Today, there

are four categories of contacts
available to the consumer: extended-
wear, hard, soft, and gas-permeable
lenses.
The newest variety of lens, which was
approved by the FDA for general sale
in January, is the extended-wear lens
which can be worn for two weeks at a
time.' Although these lenses are more
"natural," they are thinner with a
higher water content-55 percent-than
other soft contacts, they also have
several drawbacks. To begin with,
when .a lens is worn for two weeks at a
time, the oxygen does not have much of
a chance to reach the eye as it does with
other lenses. In order to let more
oxygen pass through the lens, they

must therefore be more fragile. This
fragility makes extended-wear lenses
more prone to scratching and breaking
than other lenses, and they must be
replaced more frequently. In addition,
damage to the cornea may be experien-
ced as a result of using extended-wear
lenses. Extended-wear lenses are also
the most expensive lens, and, although
they have received FDA approval, they
are in an "embryonic" stage of
development and are still considered
risky, several optometrists said.
Hard lenses, the first contact lens to
appear on the market, are the most
inexpensive lens, and are easier to care
for and much more durable than soft
See CONTACTS, Page 21

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