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May 15, 1981 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1981-05-15

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, May 15, 1981-Page 9
Auto industry seeks deregulation

WASHINGTON (UPI)-The auto industry told
Congress yesterday safety and environmental
regulations should be eased to save money for car
buyers and the industry.
But a safety advocate doubted consumers would
see any of the money the auto industry would save if
allowed to relax such standards.
THE ADMINISTRATION, which supports an
easing of auto regulations, has estimated the move
would save consumers $9.3 billion over five years, or
$150 per car and truck, said Clarence Ditlow of the
Center for Auto Safety.
But, based on past experience, "it is highly unlikely
the domestic manufacturers will pass any savings on
Local
artists
worried
about
cutbacks
(Continued from Page 3)
and continued viability of alternative
theatre.
Terry Marra, of the Arts and Craf-
tsman Guild, said that her organization
did apply =for federal grants, but none
was available. "We have already felt
the budget crunch by losing work-study
positions," said Marra.
PAUL CUNNINGHAM, an ad-
ministrator of applications and ad- The ev
ministration of National Endowment come t
for the Arts grants at the University,
said the impact of the NEA cuts at the
University would be limited because
the University receives fewer than
$300,000 in direct NEA grants.
One University program that has
been hit directly is a Library research
program which would have involved
the NEA's "Challenge Grant
Program." This program, which has
been eliminated by the NEA, was a
matching program that provided $1 of
federal money for every $3 solicited
from private contributors.
Cunningham said the possible extin-
ction of another matching-grant
program would have a serious impact PO
on existing research projects at the
University including work on the "Mid-
dle English Dictionary," and a three-
year Archeology project.
"RECOMMENDATIONS to cut the
social science research field may well
increase the competition for existing
money from programs that could con-
ceivibly fit into the NEA's definition of
arts and humanities," Cunningham
said.
All the organizations stressed the im-
portance of individual support for the
arts, both financially, and through let-
ter-writing campaigns to local, state,
and federal elected officials.
The arts shoulder an unequal burden
of the budget cutting, while con-
tributing immensely to the cultural in-
tegrity of society, they say.
Eysselinck summed up the feelings
by quoting a recent theatre bulletin, "If
one nuclear submarine were reduced
by a total of five feet, it would result in a
$5 million savings, and support for dan-
ce could remain at its present level."

to consumers," he told a House Government
Operations subcommittee.
Representatives of the three major U.S. auto com-
panies said their industry was suffering from ex-
cessive regulations imposed by the government
during the past decade.
"WE DON'T AGREE with the regulatory
philosophy that developed in the 1970s: that is, if a lit-
tle regulation is good, then a lot of regulation must be
better," said C.M. Kennedy of the Chrysler Corp.
General Motors spokesman Craig Marks likened
the situation to an overgrown garden, saying "there
is a similar need to selectively prune away those ex-
cessive regulations which cost more than they will

produce in benefits."
Marks said many of the regulations "go well
beyond what is needed to provide reasonable, cost-
effective levels of protection."
INSTEAD, THEY add costs for consumers and
producers "at a time when our resources are
desperately needed to meet the stiff competition from
abroad."
Marks and Ford Motor Co. representative H.O.
Petrauskas expressed particular interest in easing
emission standards adopted under the Clean Air Act.
"Clean Air Act changes could amount to as much
as $1 billion or more in industry-wide consumer
savings on 1983 models," Petrauskas said.

AP Photo
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