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July 26, 1980 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-07-26

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Another heat wave
A New York City fireman charges into a burning building on Manhattan's East Side yesterday. One person was reported
injured in the one-alarm blaze, which sent flames shooting out of the building's basement.
Exiled Soviet unionist
says KGB killed wife

Testimony
in Marwil
tenure suit
concludes
(Continued from Page 3)
Mathes, with whom Marwil had
clashed in 1978 over departmental hiring
policies, repeated yesterday what a
number of University witnesses-in-
cluding University President Harold
Shapiro-have already said: There is
no department, College, or University
rule requiring a tenure review for an
assistant professor in his or her sixth
year of employment.
INSTEAD, UNIVERSITY attorneys
have argued, a sixth-year faculty
member is entitled only to a guarantee
of an evaluation of his or her work; it is
the decision of a department chairper-
son to declare someone a candidate for
tenure and thereby grant a tenure
review.
Mathes said Marwil was "implicitly
told" he was in jeopardy of not
receiving a tenure review.
That testimony contrasted with
Marwil's contention that he was led to
believe in 1977 he would receive a
tenure review in 1979.
MARWIL HAS SAID he based his
belief in part on a written statement
made by Mathes regarding a two-year
contract Marwil was granted in
1977-the contract had been renewed
for two years "to further develop your
case for tenure and possible promotion
at a later date."
Mathes further testified yesterday,
under cross-examination by Marwil's
attorney, Jerold Lax, that Marwil was
"either implicitly or explicitly" told he
was in danger of not being allowed the
full two years of the contract to make
his case for tenure-testimony that also
seemd to contradict Mathes' written
1977 statement.
In fact, in 197, at the end of the first
year of the two-year contract, the ad-
ministrative committee decided to give
Marwil notice of non-reappointment-a
decision labelled unorthodox and im-
proper by Marwil.
In testimony regarding the suitability
of Marwil's scholarship, Mathes said
there were significant questions about
the quantity and quality of Marwil's
scholarly work.
Mathes added in direct testimony to
University Attorney Robert Ver-
cruysse, however, that he himself had
never actually read a book written by
Marwil, saying "It wasn't necessary
for me to read the book."
Judge Pratt has indicated he would
like to make a decision in the suit before
the fall term begins, and will begin his
deliberations August 15 after final oral
arguments are presented.
ENERGY.
We can't
afford to
waste it.

PARIS (AP) - Exiled Soviet trade
unionist Vladimir Borisov tearfully;
charged yesterday that the KGB
assassinated his wife, dissident Irina
Kaplun, and made it look like an auto
accident. Friends of Kaplun's in
Moscow raised doubts about Borisov's
claim.
"There is no doubt that my wife's
death is a premeditated crime. It's
KGB vengeance," said Borisov, who
was expelled from the Soviet Union on

In Moscow, friends of Kaplum said
they received telegraphed word that
she died with three relatives in a head-
on collision July 21 or 22 in Lithuania
and not in Estonia.
Stressing that the telegram was their
only source of information about the
accident, they said they "cannot
believe" her husband could have
claimed KGB security police were in-
volved.
BORISOV elaborated in an interview

'There's no doubt that my wife's death
is a premeditated crime. It's KGB ven-
geance.' -Exiled Soviet trade unionist
Vladimir Borisov -

alleged assassination.
" The speed limit in the Soviet Union
is 50 mph and the driver Jossif
Slobodetski, Borisov's brother-in-law,
was "considered to be a very prudent
driver who never reached the speed
limit for fear of traffic police."
" The notice of the deaths did not go
to the home of the car's owner,
Slobodetski, as Soviet law prescribes,
but to the Moscow home of Kaplun.
Borisov said his wife "felt menaced
by the Kremlin, which had not forgiven
her activities."
FOLLOWING HIS recent expulsion
from the Soviet Union, he said, the KGB
made it known to his wife, through a
third party, that the authorities "would
not allow her to remain in the Soviet
Union after her husband's departure
and establish clandestine contacts with
him across the frontiers."
He said the-KGB wanted her to
emigrate to Israel but she refused.
"The Soviet government, not wanting
to create a precedent in allowing
dissidents to leave with other visas than
for Israel, decided to assassinate Irina
Kaplun, choosing this solution as the
best," Borisov said in the interview.
At a news conference, Borisov said
his wife had been under constant KGB
surveillance since the beginning of
June, and she had driven to Tallin
thinking she would be safer there than
in Moscow.

June 22. His wife had supported the
Western boycott of the Olympic Games.
BORISOV WAS weeping when he ap-
peared before reporters to confirm
reports circulating in Moscow's
dissident circles that his wife and three
other persons were killed in a car
crash. He said it occurred on a special
route leading to the site of the Olympic
yachting events at Tallin, capital of the
Soviet republic of Estonia on the Baltic
Sea.

with the French news agency, Agence
France Presse, on his reasons for
believing the fatal car crash had been
staged by the KGB:
" The car was hit by a truck carrying
a large mobile rubbish bin while on a
"tightly controlled" road leading to the
Riga-Tallin Olympic events, and traffic
there had been "considerably
reduced."
* The road was "stuffed with
security agents," facilitating the

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