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July 25, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-07-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ONE OF 30 DEMONSTRATORS raises his hands as the group walks through a police line Wednesday night in Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., after a second night of racial unrest. Outbreaks of sporadic firebombings and rock throwings occurred
a day after an all-white jury acquitted two Ku Klux Klansmen in the April 19 shooting of four black women.
Black leaders denounce curfew
order by Chattanooga mayor

CHATTANOOGA, Teuin. (AP) - A citywide curfew was
ordered yesterday in an effort to puta lid on racial trouble in
the streets, but a black leader called it a "Band-Aid ap-
proach."
Black leaders said the curfew order by Mayor Charles
"Pat" Rose may dissipate the unrest for now, but won't deal
with the underlying causes - distress over unemployment
and tenant complaints about the quality of city housing.
VIOLENCE BROKE OUT Tuesday after an all-white
jury acquitted two Ku Klux Klansmen and convicted a third
on reduced assault charges in the April 19 shotgun shootings
of four black women.
Rose told city commissioners he is ordering all retail
businesses - including gasoline stations, restaurants and
theaters - to close from 9:30p.m. to 5:30 a.m.
A 14-member coalition of black organizations called
Wednesday for the Justice Department to investigate the 12
jurors and the records of the five-day trial. The Justice
Department already has directed the FBI to investigate the
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shootings to see whether there were any civil rights
violations.
POLICE MAINTAINED two-man patrols Wednesday
night and early yesterday in the city's heavily industrial,
predominantly black Alton Park area. Firebombings, rock
and bottle throwing and attempts to set fires had kept of-
ficials busy for the past two nights. Injuries have been few,
but the fires have damaged two warehouses, a restaurant
and stores.
Police asked people to avoid the Alton Park area if
possible. Fire and Police Commissioner Walter Smart said
yesterday, however, that scattered arson arrests and rock
throwing were beginning to occur in other parts of the city.
Johnny Holloway, a coalition member and local
moderator for Operation PUSH (People United to Save
Humanity) said the mayor would do more to ease tension by
meeting with black leaders and tenants from city housing
projects to hear grievances over unemployment and the
housing.
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Pryor
checks out
of hospital
after six
week stay
SHERMAN OAKS (AP) - Richard
Pryor was discharged from the Sher-
man Oaks burn ward yesterday after-
noon, dressed in his own clothes,
walking out without any assistance, and
accompanied by family members and
close friends, a hospital spokesman
said.
Gary Swaye said the 39-year-old
comedian had left left ,the Sherman
Oaks Community Hospital for several
hours earlier in the day for an interview
with ABC's Barbara Walters, but then
returned to the hospital.
"HIS DOCTORS knew he would be
discharged soon," Swayes said. "But
after talking to him today they decided
not to delay it any longer and released
him quietly this afternoon."
Swaye said that a nurse therapist was
waiting at home for Pryor and would
assist family members in taking care of
him for awhile.
Pryor might undergo plastic surge-y
if scarring sets in, Swaye said. He said
that decision probably would be made
in several weeks.
NETWORK OFFICIALS refused to
say where the interview with Walters
took place, but it was conducted out-
doorsandSwaye said it may have been
at Pryor's home in nearby Northridge.
"It (the interview) was set up by his
doctors (burn specialists Richard and
Jack Grossman) and apparently was at
his home," Swaye said, adding that the
interview came as a surprise to him.
He said Pryor was gone for a couple
of hours before returning to the
hospital, and apparently the interview
had no effect on Pryor's condition.
Swaye said Pryor remains in
satisfactory condition, unchanged since
he underwent his third skin graft
operation June 14. He said no further
surgery is planned for Pryor, though
the comedian will return to the burn
center regularly as an outpatient for
occupational therapy and checkups.
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative
Presents at MLB: . FREE
FRIDAY, JULY 25
Goin' Down the Road
(DONALD SHEBID, 1970)
7& 10:20 MLB4 FREE
Christopher Strong
(DOROTHY ARZNER, 1933)
8:40 MLB 4 FREE
A uilywoid cyrioity, Christopher Sting
enabitionI n arpen p o hd frt
p n s sritys h i nog a ilne git rct xhiamp Th
H pburn nowb ke that f ny th e an i ni
an ythiteR bat hns o aneo d s g ests ht
chrysis a the sCpana anbr n e t he atin ."
-Sally Hasknfl.
Tomorrow: John Ford's DRUMS
ALONG THE MOHAWK and YOUNG
M. LNCOLN ut MLB. FREE

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