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July 18, 1980 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-07-18

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, July 18, 1980-Page 7

Regents to decide on tuition hike

By MITCH STUART
Special to The Daily
TRAVERSE CITY - University
Regents will decide here today whether
to enact a 1980-81 fiscal year budget
that includes a 13 per cent across-the-
board tuition hike and a nine per cent
staff salary increase.
In a budget briefing session yester-
day, executive officers told the Regents
the tuition hike - the largest in five
years - is essential to maintain high
quality in University programs.
IF THE REGENTS approve the
budget proposals, including the in-
crease in tuition, most students would
pay 13 per cent more than the current
rate. Law School students would pay 17
per cent more, and extension service
rates would go up 10 per cent.
Michigan undergraduates would pay
$682 per term in the lower division and
$768 in the upper division. Non-resident
freshpersons and sophomores would
pay $2,060 per term; juniors and seniors
would pay $2,218.
i Under the University's plan, $875,000
in new state money would be slated for
financial aid, "to ensure that no studen-
ts will be denied the opportunity to at-
tend the University of Michigan for lack
of money."
REGENT DAVID Laro (R-Flint)
asked if University officers had con-
sidered this year, as they have in the
past, cutting off one or more of the
various schools and colleges.
President Harold Shapiro assured
Laro that such a plan to slow soaring
tuition rates had been considered, but
with the stqte's economy as it is, he
said, "The prospects for decreasing the
rate of increase of tuition are not very
good."
Discussions during the Regents'
matino at the Tntarlanhan NTtia'a

Music Camp here centered on the
University budget for fiscal 1980-81.
Most officials bemoaned the necessity
of a large tuition increase and focused
on methods to keep the hike as small as
possible.
REGENT ROBERT Nederlander (D-
Birmingham) called for vigorous
recruitment of endowments and other
private sources of money to make up
for the state's sagging economy,
saying, "Unless we lift ourselves up by
our own bootstraps, which is in effect
getting funding from private sources,
we will have major problems in the
n xt few years."
,ederlander also warned against the
University concentrating too heavily on
capital development projects such as
new buildings to the detriment of
program development.
Shapiro responded: "The easiest
thing to get funds for on a difficult scale
is brick and mortar, and the hardest
thing is program development."
The University president was firm in
his statement that some cutbacks in
THEANNARROR
FILM COOPERATIVE
Presents at MLB-$s50
FRIDAYJULY 18
THE CONVERSATION
(Francis Ford Coppola, 1974)
7 & 9-MLB 3
GENE HACKMAN as the tnatassianal wireap-
eNE HanryCa whoseconflictng dedicatonand
sense of guilt ore the backdrop for asuspenseful
study of American post-Watergate paranoia. A
haunting soundtrack threads through this chilling
tim, both explanatory and confusing as Coppola
attains a quiet intensity equal to Bergman.
Tomorrow: Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek in
BADLANDS and James Dean in EAST OF
EDEN at MS
T!
0I

programs will be necessary to keep the
University functioning. "There is no
question ... that the University is get-
ting smaller," he said, "and that means
we won't be able to do everything we
now do and do it well."
Shapiro added, "There are certain
things that we are going to stop
doing ... but we are diffusing these
things so that they have a minimum
impact."
Billy Frye, vice president for
academic affairs, stressed the impor-
tance of a salary hike of nine per cent.

All too often, he said, peer institutions
pay top notch faculty more than they
would earn at the University. "To allow
further slippage at this time could be
quite disastrous.. . nine per cent is a
stark minimum," he said.

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