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July 15, 1980 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 14-Tuesday, July 15, 1980-The
Soviets
refuse to
transmit
Olympic
TV film
MOSCOW (UPI) - Soviet censors
have refused to transmit a West Ger-
man television film they charged mixed
politics and sports at the Olympic
Games in a move consistent with ad-
vice given by IOC President Lord
Killanin.
Killanin, outgoing head of the Inter-
national Olympic Committee, has ad-
vised journalists in Moscow to confine
their coverage of the summer Games to
sports and to eschew political coverage.
THE 63-YEAR-OLD Irish peer, who
strongly opposed President Carter's
call for an Olympic boycott after the
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, said
"There has been too much chauvinism,
flag waving and anthem playing at the
games."
That advice was praised by the
Soviets and apparently led to the
refusal to transmit the film made by
Klaus Bednarz, Moscow correspondent
for the West German ARD network.
Bednarz said the censors, employees
of the Soviet state radio who work
alongside the European Broadcasting
Union, ruled he could not transmit a
feature titled "Olympics and
Propaganda" because "it was not a
film about sports."
He said the censors had first claimed
incorrectly that his film contained an
interview with the wife of exiled
dissident Andrei Sakharov. That claim
was disproved when the film was
screened.
Bednarz said yesterday the censor-
ship had been protested through the
EBU, which operates the special Olym-
pic transmission pool linking European
networks.

-----AP Photo:
Treed truck A ht
The Muskegon County Sheriff's Department found itself investiating a "high-rise" accident yesterday-a pick-up truck
lodged 20 feet in the trees after driver Jeffrey Schoonfield lost control of the vehicle on Scenic Drive. Schoonfield
was listed in fair condition yesterday at Mercy Hospital.
JOINT EDITION CREA TED T O COUNTER STRIKE:
Free Press, News to publish

DETROIT (UPI) - The Detroit News
and Detroit Free Press announced
plans yesterday to publish a joint, in-
tegrated edition for the duration of a
strike by Free Press truck drivers and
'circulation employees.
The move followed largely successful
efforts by striking Teamsters union
members to block street distribution of
copies of a limited edition of the Free
Press that rolled off the presses of the
rival News.
ONLY A "minority" of the 40,000
copies of the special 16-page Free Press
edition were delivered Sunday night

and early yesterday morning to various
locations around the city, newspaper
spokesmen said,
Under the new arrangement between
the two competitors, the News planned
to publish a 92-page edition today that
will include a 24-page Free Press sec-
tion, Free Press Executive Editors
David Lawrence said.
The paper will carry a combination of
news and features from both papers
under a joint masthead.
"We are working out a revenue-

sharing arrangement which will be
operative for the durationof the current
strike," the newspapers said in a joint
statement.
"Although the two newspapers or-
dinarily compete in every aspect of
publishing, we cooperate fully on labor
matters," the statement continued.
The unique publishing arrangen ent
was designed to allow the Free Pres to
salvage at least some of its coverage of
the Republican National Convention,
which opened one day after the walkout
hit the paper.

I
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Young Repubs carry torch
for party's future battles

(Continuedfrom Page3)'
Conover, 17, said that the Republican
platform is neutral towards the ERA.
"We all favor equal rights, but we
-just go about it differently. That's what
the party platform says," she ex-
plained.
"I'm all for equal pay and all that,"
said Richie Renfrow, a young man from
Mississippi ("where everyone is con-
servative.") "I just don't want to see
women in combat," he explained.
David Belford, 15, says he supports

Reagan because he likes the former
governor better than any of the other
presidential candidates. "Reagan
seems like the kind of person
Eisenhower was - real clean cut," he
said.
Convention
drawsgrups
(Continued from Page 5
register for the draft. "This is your
chance to step in and change American
policy," she stated.
Virginia Cholesterol and A. Tad Slick,
a Hollywood couple attending the rally,
said they were in Detroit to run the
"Reagan for Shah" campaign.
"We want to see Reagan become the
first native shah and we have a lot of
endorsements now." They said
organizations such as the National
Association for the Advancement of
Rich People, Peace Resistors League,
Mutants for a Radioactive Environ-
ment, and Citizens for Total Defoliation
were actively endorsing their can-
didate.

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