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July 11, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-Friday, July 11, 1980-The Michigan Daily
moz
adapts to
Paaguay

ASUNCION, Paraguay (AP)-A year after
Sandinista guerrillas drove him from his homeland,
Anastasio Somoza is living the life of a wealthy
recluse, tending his businesses from afar, toying with
new investments and dreaming about going back to
Nicaragua.
He also worries about extradition, is growing fat,
feels depressed over losing his country, and is trying
to avoid doing anything that will embarrass his host,
President Alfredo Stroessner.
IN A 90-MINUTE interview-given on condition
that he not be quoted directly-the toppled Central
American leader talked freely about his life and his
regrets.
Somoza blames communism, President Carter,
and former Venezuelan President Carlos Andres
Perez for his fall from power, but he said he is not bit-
ter.
If he had to do it all over again, he said, he might
have surrendered power earlier to some form of

provisional government, avoiding further bloodshed.
The Nicaraguan Red Cross estimates 50,000 people
were killed in one year of fighting that ended shortly
after Somoza left Nicaragua July 17,1979.
HE SAID HE believes the left-wing Sandinistas
were foolish to press socialism so quickly on
Nicaragua, that a popular revolt is inevitable, and
that it could pave the way for his return-maybe even
to political power.
Somoza, a West Point graduate, said the United
States dealt the fatal blow to his government when it
cut off military assistance to Nicaragua because of
the regime's alleged human rights violations and
pressured other nations to do likewise.
He blames Carter for this and warns unless the
United States gets tougher on communism, an
American will not be able to set foot across the Rio
Grande 10 years from now.

60

a

PRESENTS
BERGMAN'S SUMMER CLASSICS
SMILES OF A SUMMER NIGHT
(INGMAR BERGMAN, 1955)
In a rare mood of comedy and romance, Bergman has captured
the essence of spicy partner switching. Reminscent of Shake-
speare's classic comedies, the Cannes Film Festival winner was
the inspiration for Sondheim's hit Broadway musical, A LITTLE
NIGHT MUSIC. The three smiles-of a summer night: for young
lovers, for clowns and fools, and for the sad and depressed. A
real treat for a summer's eve. Swedish with subtitles. (108 mii)
SUMMER INTERLUDE
(INGMAR BERGMAN, 1950)
One of Bergman's favorite films, SUMMER INTERLUDE has a
sense of lyricism and life that is truly unique. Discovering the
diary of a former lover, a ballerina recalls a summer affair with
its delirious happiness and tragedy. The sparkling water, the
clear air and the natural beauty of Sweden provide the perfect
backdrop for an eloquent remembrance of the joys of first love.
With the Stockholm Royal Ballet. (95 mijn)
AUD A, ANGELL HALL $1.50 one show, $2.50 double
TOMORROW: PINK PANTHER & A SHOT IN THE DARK

Gas venting almost
complete at Three
Mile Island facility

i

MIDDLETOWN, Pa. (AP) - Venting
of radioactive krypton gas from the
reactor building at the Three Mile
Island nuclear plant was virtually
completed yesterday, much earlier
than expected, a utility official said.
Robert Arnold, senior vice president,
of Metropolitan Edison Co., said the
concentration of gas apparently was
lower than the original estimate of
57,000 curies.
SO FAR, he said, 43,000 curies have
been released into the atmosphere sin-
ce venting began June 28. Only 10 to 15
curies remained and probably will be
released by this morning, Arnold said.
"From a practical standpoint off site,
we're finished venting," he said.
"We're absolutely delighted with the
progress we've made clearing the
building of krypton."
He said officials kept their estimates
conservative "to insure a comfortable
margin of safety."
THE 43,000 curie figure has a 10 per

ChO~11f or 5
ala. the
en l
freh r0Crol

cent uncertainty, but is consistent with
what technicians believe to be con-
ditions inside the building, Arnold said.
With the air inside cleared of krypton,
some additional gas may come out of
water still covering the building floor,
Arnold said. But he added he expects
only small quantities of'10 to 100 curies,
which will be vented before manned re-
entry, now about four weeks away.
He said technicians will spend the
next two to three weeks testing the door
into the containment building to insure
it will operate properly when re-entry is
attempted. The first try in May was
canceled when two engineers couldn't
open the door. Technicians found later
that a locking mechanism had rusted
out.
The next step will be to collect data on
the extent of the damage inside, Arnold
said. By November, the company hopes
to begin decontaminating the hundreds
of thousands of gallons of water that
spilled from the reactor cooling system
onto the containment building floor
during the March 1979 accident, the
nation's worst commercial nuclear
mishap.
With the venting nearly completed,
off-site radiation doses have stayed
well within guidelines set by the
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Ar-
nold said.
The RC/BRECHT COMPANY Presents
The
Resistible
Rise of
Arturo Ui
'Ju'ly 9-13 & 16-20
East Quad Auditorium
Wed.-Sat: 8 p.m., Sun. R p.m.
TICKETS $3 & $4 AT DOOR
Call 763-0176 for information

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