100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 09, 1980 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-07-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan DaIly-Wednesday, July 9, 1980-Page 11
Heat wave death
count declines
as residents
adjust to climate.

By United Press International
Officials linked more than 200 deaths
in a nine-state area to a relentless heat
wave yesterday but said a decline in the
death rate indicated sweltering
residents were learning how to deal
with the blistering weather.
Many towns in the "Heat Belt" were
dangerously low on water and there
were more indications the heatwave
would have serious financial im-
plications.
IN DALLAS, where 61 of Texas' 85
heat deaths were reported, Don Kirby
of the medical examiner's staff said
fewer deaths had been reported this
week.
"It seems to be easing," he said. "It's
a matter of becoming acclimated to the
heat and learning how to deal with it.
It's like jogging - if you're not used to
it, it takes a while to get used to it."
In Arkansas, where 76 heat-related
deaths have been reported, medical of-
ficials said a decline in the number of
fatalities indicated the public had

become aware of the dangers of heat
stroke.
LITTLE ROCK television stations,
which reach mnost of the state, have
been issuing periodic weather alerts to
relay the temperature and methods to
avoid heat exhaustion.
Two-hundred-eight heat-related
deaths have been reported in the nine-
state area with 30 in Oklahoma, six
each in Kansas and Tennessee, two in
Louisiana and one each in Missouri,
Mississippi, and Alabama.
Greenbr'ier, Ark., like many small
towns, was facing a critical water sup-
ply problem because of the extremely
hot and dry weather. Mayor Eddie
Garrett said the city's water supply -
normally 250,000 gallons - had dropped
to 40,000 last week.
"A major fire or something like that
would wipe us out," he said.
Other towns have declared states of
emergency to close swimming pools
and banning use of water for watering
lawns and washing cars.

Support for Prohibition
Olive Bryan, an 80-year-old member of the Women's Chrit
Union, holds a white flag and temperance pledge of the 106
St. Albans, West Virginia Monday. The organization boasts
worldwide.
Congress decreases
financial aid grants

A
stian Temperance
-year-old union in
250,000 members

(Continued from Page 3)
less for NDSL's than they got in '79-
'10."
Michigan State Assistant Financial
Aid Director Tony Rogers said her
school's NDSL allocation was
decreased from $669,000 in '79-'80 to
$224,000 in '80-'81.
While loan and grant funds are down,
financial aid applications are up at
Michigan colleges. Peterson said
Michigan State experienced a "definite
increase" in the number of students
applying for aid, while University of
Michigan Financial Aid Director Har-
vey Grotrian said applications were up
eight to ten per cent over last year.
"That figure represents a normal in-
crease in overall growth, but ap-
plications for Guaranteed Student

Loans (GSL's-government-insured
loans contracted through private
banks) are coming in twice as fast as
last year. We get 500 a week," Zim-
merman explained.
EVERY N P--10
50 OFFCOVER
GREAT REDUCED PRICES ON
ALL BEVERAGES df,

** TWO SHOwSR -EIPM 11PM **
T *5 ^''AVAILASLE AT: DISCOVNT ,5ECOND CHANCE,
'~ WIHEREHOUSE RECORDS RccOnsLANp BRIARWooD.
*S i - S 6 .6-n r

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan