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June 21, 1980 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-06-21

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, June 21, 1980--Page 9
UNREST SPREADS TO INDUSTRIAL AREA

Police
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa
(AP) - Police fired tear gas and
shotguns to disperse striking black and
mixed-race workers who marched in
Uitenhage yesterday, press reports
said, as unrest spread to the industrial
section of this white-ruled country.
The South African Press Association
said police arrested two people in
Uitenhage and one mixed-race man
was reported wounded in both legs.
MORE THAN 7,000 workers in the
Uitenhage area, the center of the coun-
try's automobile industry, were on
strike demanding higher wages. Some
factories not hit by the strikes were for-
ced to close because they could not get
components they needed from striking
plants.
Twelve companies, including
Goodyear's tire factory, were closed

shoot S. African strikers
yesterday. Negotiations continued bet- THE RACIAL disturbances began crowds gathered for illegal om-
ween management and worker nearly three months ago in the Cape Meanwhile foreign ministers from 50
representatives. peninsula with a school boycott by Ai
About 1,000 Goodyear tire workers mixed-race students protesting inferior African nations expressed full support
walked off the job yesterday when education and facilities yesterday for "the national liberation
management refused to meet demands The student protest soon spread struggle of the South African people in
for wages of $3.75 an hour. The current nationwide and became a more general l its forms, luding the armed
hourly wage is $1.35. protest against South Africa's system struggle.
BLACK MUNICIPAL workers in the of racial segregation. Workers deman- hresolution unanimously adopted by
eastern Cape area near Port Elizabeth ding higher wages, better working con- the meetin g of misters called on the
joined the strike, the news agency said. ditions and union recognition walked off U.N. Security Council "to impose
The Cape Flats, an area of mixed- their jobs in Cape Town, Durban and obligatory and global sanctions against
race townships outside Cape Town, and Port Elizabeth about the same time. boh Africa, inclgoing an oil em-
non-white townships outside Johan- Violence broke out last Sunday, the 'The
nesburg and Durban were calm yester- eve of the fourth anniversary of the The African foreign ministers are
day. Police ind demonstrators clashed bloody Soweto uprising. Police used preparing for a summit meeting of the
in those areas earlier in the week. night sticks and tear gas to break up frican cuntries scheduled here early
Police put the official death toll in
those demonstrations at 32, but '
newspapers said 42 persons died and THE MOVIES AT BRIARWOOD
several-hundred were injured. 194 & S. STATE. 769-8780 (Adjacent to J C Penney)
* DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES-Adults $1.50

Shapiro to speak on
possible staff changes

By KEVIN TOTTIS
University President Harold Shapiro
will attend the faculty Senate Assembly
meeting Monday to discuss his ideas
concerning possible changes in faculty
and staff.
Shapiro has advocated maintaining a
smaller, better paid and supported
faculty and staff. Because members of
the Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs were concerned
much of the faculty was unaware of
Shapiro's philosophies, they asked him
to attend the Assembly's monthly
meeting.
ENGINEERING PROF. Arch
Naylor, SACUA chairman, said he an-
ticipates "a significantly large audien-
ce. It (Shapiro's plan) has generated a
lot of interest."
Naylor added it is important to the
faculty to learn how any plans are
"going to be turned into a reality." He

said the meeting will provide an impor-
tant opportunity "because the plans are
not set in concrete - the faculty can
have an opportunity to raise important
issues with the president."
Shapiro said yesterday nothing
definite will be decided at the meeting.
"I'll learn something from the reaction
(of the faculty) and they'll learn
something from what I have to say,"
Shapiro said.
Naylor said Shapiro was eager to
work with the Assembly when he was
approached by SACUA.
Shapiro realized June was a difficult
time to have the meeting, Naylor said,
and if the turnout was not good, "he
would be willing to do it again in Sep-
tember."
The president said he has "absolutely
no idea" what faculty reaction to his
plans might be.

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