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June 06, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-06-06

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Page 10-Friday, June 6,1980-The Michigan Daily
Gas tax veto overridden

4

From AP and UPI.
WASHINGTON - President Carter
cast his promised veto yesterday of a
bill disapproving hishdime-a-gallon
gasoline fee but two hours later the
House of Representatives voted to
override it by a bruising 18 to 1 margin.
The vote was 335-to-34, far in exces§
of the two-thirds needed to override the
veto.
THE SENATE is expected to take a
similar vote today and force the repeal
leg slation into law over Carter's objec-
tion. That would make him the first
Democratic president to have a veto
overridden since Harry Truman in 1952.
Carter, in his veto message, urged
Congress to resist "political pressures"
and let him impose the fee, which he
called "good public policy and good
commonsense."
But the House bulldozed over his veto

with as much dispatch as it had used in
flattening the fee the day before on a
376-30 vote.
THE FEE, WHOSE legality has
already been challenged by a federal
judge, can now only take effect if the
Senate sustains Carter's veto. Both
chambers must deliver a two-thirds
override vote before a veto can be
negated.
But while the vote was expected to be
closer in the Senate than it was in the
house, Senate leaders said they did not
expect the veto to be sustained - par-
ticularly in light of the wide margin by
which the fee was rejected there on
Wednesday.
When Carter's veto message was
hand-carried into the House chamber
and announced, loud cheering and ap-
plause erupted from members on the
floor. Speaker Thomas O'Neill had to
bang his gavel several times to restore

silence.
THE HOUSE debated the veto for
less than five minutes before taking the
vote. "We've talked the matter to
death," said Rep. Al Ullman (D-Ore.),
chairman of the House Ways and
Means Committee.
"It doesn't help for public officials to
stand up and make speeches about con-
serving energy and controlling inflation
and controlling unemployment unless
they are willing to face the political
heat when the time comes to make a
tough decision for the benefit of this
country," Carter told reporters in the
Oval Office.
Then he took a pen and signed the
veto message.

Carter wanted the fee as a means of
causing people to use less petroleum,
but his opponents in Congress -
Democrats as well as Republicans -
said he just wanted to use the fee to help
balance the budget. They called ita tax
on drivers.
The House, by a voice vote, had
earlier yesterday swiftly approved the
Senate's decision to link the gas fee
legislation to the public debt ceiling.
It appears there will be no immediate
cash crisis from the veto of the debt
ceiling. Congressional sources said
Treasury Secretary G. William Miller
told them financial problems would not
develop until next Tuesday at the
earliest.

4

Deng Xmopng plans
semi-retirement soon

TOM hTNE
used on the True Story

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PEKING (AP) - The architect of
China's modernization efforts, Deng
Xiaoping, widely considered the coun-
try's most powerful politician, said
yesterday he plans to give up some of
his responsibilities in August by
resigning as vice-premier.
Deng also said it will be "extremely
difficult" for China to become even a
moderately well-off society by the end
of the century. However, he added, "We
are confident this target can be
achieved."
DENG, 76, SAID although he will
resign as senior vice-premier he will
retain three other posts until 1985.
These are Communist Party vice-
chairman, vice-chairman of the
Military Commission and chairman of
the national United Front organization.
"I want to live a little longer," he
said, adding that he fears by 1985 his
mind will not be as active as it is now.
In an exclusive interview with The
Associated Press in April, Deng first
disclosed plans to quit as vice-premier.
He added the August target date at a

rare news conference held during a
meeting of editorial writers from
throughout China.
THIS WAS the first time in recent
years that a Chinese leader had held a
news conference attended by American
resident correspondents.
Deng said, "My consideration is not
to retire altogether. I . . . want to
reduce the burden of routine work."
He also said China plans to abolish its
system of lifetime tenure for official
posts, including the nation's top job of
Communist Party chairman.
This move and Deng's example are
seen as part of efforts to ease out old or
obstinate officials, including many who
gained their jobs under the now-
rejected radicals, who might slow
China's modernization drive.
Asked if China, which is planning
county-level elections later this year,
might some day consider a national
election of top officers, Deng replied:
"With such a large country and so
many people, it would not be easy to
practice a national election as you have
in the West."

I

I

I

,CINEMA.1IIr
(Richard Brooks, 1955)
A terrifying story of rampant juvenile delinquency and crime in y
a large city's vocational school. Glenn Ford stars as the dedi-
cated teacher who brings jazz to the classroom, Vic Morrow is
a classic juvie and Sidney Poitier plays a bright, street-wise
student who earns his teacher's respect. With Anne Francis,
Paul Mazursky and "Rock Around the Clock" as its theme song.
(101 min). PLUS: BETTY BOOP in DANCING FOOL, 7:30 only.
WILD IN THE STREETS
(Barry Shear. 1968)
The24-year-old rock star. Max Frost. is elected President after
the voting age is lowered to 14; he immediately sends everyone
over 35-to concentration camps. A tale of the 60's mentality
gone wild! With Richard Pryor, Shelley Winters, Christopher
Jones, Hal Holbrook. (90 min). PLUS: BETTY BOOP In DANC-
ING FOOL, 9:30 ONLY.

Awn

THE 3 STOOGES FOLLIES SFR.
A COLLECTION OF THEIR G2:)
FINEST FUNNIEST FILMS
FRI.
SAT.
12:00 MID
(PG)

MLB 4

$1.50 one show

$2.50 both shows

Tomorrow: MIDNIGHT COWBOY

L.

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