100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 31, 1980 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-05-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Saturday,May 31, 1980-Page7
Debt extension approved

From UPI and AP
WASHINGTON - Congress voted
yesterday to extend the national debt
ceiling for five days, staving off for the
time being a money shortage that could,
have affected Social Security checks
and other important federal payments.
But the move simply put off until next
week a showdown between Congress
and President Carter over his decision
to impose a dime-a-gallon gasoline fee.
THE HOUSE approved the short-
term debt ceiling extension after mem-
bers were promised they will be
3 intend
to run for
2 Regent
positions
(Continued from Page 3)
"The budget is the central issue,"
Laro said, but went on to warn, "The
budgetary problems will not be over
when the recession is over."
Laro is a Flint tax attorney who first
became a Regent in June of 1975. At
that time, Gov. William Milliken ap-
pointed him to fill a vacancy.
BAKER SAID, "Certainly the single
most pressing problem is the financial
problem."
He added, though, that this Univer-
sity "has the ability to go over these
(economic) peaks and valleys that
others might not."
Baker is president of his own Ann Ar-
bor-based construction company. First
elected to the board in 1972, Baker has
since become a well-known figure in the
community for his outspoken manner.
VARNER SAID as a Regent she
would address "maintaining adequate
resources to keep the University an
academic institution of excellence."
She defined resources as not only
money, but also a quality faculty and
the power to draw students here.
"I have had complete exposure to
every level of education at the Univer-
sity. This in itself would make me
unique to the board," she said.
Varner earned her Ph.D. at the
University in 1968. Between 1968 and
1979, she served as a professor and ad-
ministrator. Her posts included direc-
tor of the University's affirmative ac-
tion programs and associate dean of
Rackham.
Kwik said the Citizen's Party may at-
tempt to get a candidate on the Novem-
ber ballot, or failing that, may try for
the November 1982 election.
Kwik said the candidate "would
probably be someone in the University
community (studjent or faculty mem-
ber). The problem is that a lot of
student issues on campus aren't ad-
dressed by the (Democratic and
Republican) parties."
The Citizen's candidate would have
students' and nationwide concerns at
heart, Kwik said, citing draft
registration and South African divest-
ment as examples. "Our platform calls
for cuts in militar spending and in-
c eased funding f edcation, he
said.

allowed to vote soon on the gasoline fee
issue.
Several hours later, the Senate voted
4710 to go along with the brief exten-
sion."
Opponents of the gasoline fee have
tried repeatedly to use the debt ceiling
legislation as a vehicle for repealing
Carter's right to impose the price hike
at the pumps.
THE DEBT ceiling and gasoline fee
are not related but it is common prac-
tice on Capitol Hill to attach a con-
troversial issue to a vital piece of
legislation.
Carter said yesterday in a -letter to
House Speaker Thomas O'Neill he will
veto any legislation - even measures
raising the debt ceiling - if it takes
away his power to impose the gasoline
fee.
O'Neill, who supports Carter on the
gasoline fee, first promised House
members a vote on the issue June 10,
but in further negotiations between
House and Senate leaders the timetable
was moved up to next week.
CONGRESSIONAL leaders have said
there is a good chance such a veto could
be overridden.
In other congressional news, Senate
Democratic leader Robert Byrd, urging
congressional negotiators to fashion a
WEDNESDAY "BARGAIN T NEE
INLDNWAYSIDE ICGt

new budget resolution, said yesterday a
spending plan that provides a strong
defense is "neither unfair nor unjust."
Byrd asked members of a House-
Senate conference committee to
resolve their differences "as soon as
possible" and added, in a Senate
speech, "The efforts which were begun
in March should not be permitted to
languish."
THE CONFERENCE committee had
agreed on a $613.3 billion balanced
budget. But it was turned down by the
House Thursday night, 242-141.
Both President Carter and House
Speaker Thomas O'Neill had called for
its defeat on grounds it carried too
much for defense and not enough for
domestic programs.
Since the House turned down the con-
ference committee's proposed budget,
the Senate did not havea chance to vote
on it.
THE BUDGET put together by the
conference committee included $153.7
billion for defense, which is $20 billion
more than provided in the fiscal 1980
spending plan.
As a result of the congressional battle
over the budget, about 600,000 jobless
auto workers, ex-servicemen, and for-
mer federal employees may find their
unemolovment checks cut off

prematurely next week.
Labor Department officials say
payments will come to an immediate
halt for at least two weeks, and possibly
much longer, beginning next Wed-
nesday, when a special jobless benefit
fund runs out of money.
Checks can be resumed only after
Congress approves a Carter ad-
ministration request for an additinal
$1.1 billion to keep the fund solvent
through Sept. 30.
Department officials do not expect
Congress to begin taking up the matter
until next Wednesday at the earliest. By
that time, the Federal Unemployment
Benefit Account - known as FUBA -
will be exhausted. And once the system
shuts down, it will take a week or two
after congressional action to resume
the flow of checks.
STAVELOT TRIPTYCH
NEW YORK (AP)-An exhibition
titled "The Stavelot Triptych, Mosan
Art, and the legend of the True Cross,"
continues at the Pierpont Morgan
Library through July 31.
The triptych, made in the 12th cen-
tury, has been described as one of the
greatest Romanesque treasures in the
United States.

I

3A1UM KRISTY
O'NEAL McNiCHOL PETER
So, TceThur, Fi700930
So 130400700930SIRLEY
SMacLAINE
a story of
chance
Tlrde BEING
a 1C hum ijarlingS THERE
ypOSn* A PARAMOUNT PICTURE R uitdrsts
pco~~ oUre3C00 . (upper Level) (Upper le:e)
Moo, huFri7:5-9:4s Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri7:0- 9:30
~S ' SunoWed) 32-425.725-945 So S, 0Wed 400-7:00-9:30
Mon, Tue Thur, Fr i730-9:50 MonTue, Thur, Fr7:15-9:40
Sot, Sun, Wed1:3 .4:30.7:30.9:50 SotSun. Wed 1:1s-4:1s-7:1s-9:40
Sn, Tue, Thor Fri730940
5, S" Wed 1:00-3 10-5207309:40
An American
Dream
Becomes aA eigfiy
B o "LoveStory.bizarre comedy.
ti(i.OY SiAO(FK JOoEPHWMococ'S
TII)MMY I.(( 9I"xNhS _
TlenY THE BL4K
nlMICTE _ '-.MARBLE o

TONIGHT AT MIDNIGHT wR+ OUTGEIDISH
y+ BOZZETTO OUTOOES DISNlE4 NOTHING
IS BAD
'IIF
IT FEELS
GOOD
4 a l~ove ad se
to r1170 ,
ALSO "HARDWARE WARS D CDu P U s

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan