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May 29, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sour economy pushes
jobless relief claims
to 13 year high

_4

4

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - Layoffs in the
automobile, construction and transpor-
tation equipment industries boosted the
number of jobless people receiving
unemployment benefits during the
week of May 10 by nearly 1.5 million
over a year ago, the Labor Department-
reported yesterday.
The total of 3,635,400 getting unem-
ployment insurance was 57,100 more
than the previous week and represented
the largest number of claims in any
week since at least 1967, an ominous
sign of a new surge in the nation's
jobless rate.
THE LABOR Department said a
seasonally adjusted record of 675,00
Americans filed new claims for jobless
benefits in the week ending May 17, a
sharp jump from the previous high of
616,000 first-time claims recorded the
week before.
The employment report was released
as Treasury Secretary G. William
Mfiller conceded that the economy's
slide into recession has been "quite
steep." But he said the worst of the
downturn may be over and the Carter
administration's economic policies
should stay on a steady course.
Meanwhile, in other economic
developments yesterday:
" The Federal Reserve Board drop-
ped its key lending rate, the discount

rate, one percentage point to 12 per cent
- a move that should result in further
declines in bank, interest rates. The
board said the move was made to
reflect "recent substantial declines in
short-term interestrates.
" The nation's trade deficit narrowed
to $1.9 billion in April, the smallest in
three years, as oil imports dropped
dramatically at the start of recession,
the government reported. The deficit
was down sharply from the $3.2 billion
by which imports had exceeded exports
in March and was the smallest deficit
since the $1.4 billion in May 1977.
The Labor Department, revising an
earlier estimate, reported that the
productivity of private business during
the first three months of 1980 declined
for a fifth consecutive quarter, this
time at an annual rate of 0.7 per cent, to
mark the longest string of productivity
declines since 1973-74.
" The Labor Department also said
privately employed workers' "real"
hourly compensation - wages and
fringe benefits adjusted for inflation -
declined at an annual rate of 4.9 per
cent during the first quarter, leaving
them at the same compensation level as
in late 1975. It was the ninth straight
quarter that real hourly compensation
has failed to rise, the longest such
period in the 33 years the government
has been measuring real compensation.

4

4

Kubler-Ross probes

Fashion-mindedT -
Speaker of the House Thomas "Tip" O'Neill, left, chats with former President
Gerald Ford during a break on the golf course yesterday. Ford is the honorary
chairman of the Kemper Open, being played at the Congressional Country
Club near Washington.
THORSDAY, MAY 29, 1980
Elizabeth Dorus
Dept. of Psychiatry, Univ. of Chicago
"Genetic Aspects of Lithium Transport
in Manic Depressive Illness"
MHR1 Conference room 1057
3:45 to 5:00 p.m.
Tea 3:15 p.m. MHRI lounge
Fulllne of 1
Backpacking& 1
VampigEquipment
ARMY SURPLUS
We stock a full line of
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equipment, and Uw R
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1
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life after death issue
(Conitinuedfrom Page 6) experiences.
preparing a aead body (for autopsy) After the dead person sheds his or]
should remember that the patient can earthly body, he or she then assume
hear everything they say." "perfect" body for a short tit
THE DEAD person becomes aware Kubler-Ross continued. He or she t
that he or she is in a place where time sheds that and approaches "a light t
and space do not exist, she continued. is spiritual energy from God - it'
"You can be anywhere in a nioment's plane we cannot conceive," she said.
thought. If you die in Michigan and your "IT'S IN THAT presence that
parents are in Japan, you can still be must evaluate your entire eart
with them because distande doesn't existence. The only thing that count
matter." the end of life is the love that ye
Kubler-Ross said she verified her given 'unconditionally;' all other b
theories through 20,000 case studies of accounts and college degrees
near-death experiences. She added she forgotten in that presence," she said
herself has had several "out-of-body" Another method Kubler-Ross uses
COUPON "" "m ' verify her hypotheses regarding life
* ter death is by studying the victims
volved in "multiple-family" accider
such as car accidents occurring o.
U0holiday weekend. According to Kub
I Ross, dying children who have not b
told that their parents are already d(
:i11 talk about seeing their parent
haven.
"A child will say, 'It's OK to
because Mommy and Daddy
waiting for me there'," she said. "A
intnyears of studying these multif
CH A N D ISE accidentsI never had a ci.
who made a mistake."
"Remember, each of you is
SThis master of your own destiny," Kub
Kcept Sale Items) Ross told her audience. "If youc
raise your children to live without g
ires May 31 , 1980 andfear, and lead a full life yours
you will have made a positive c
C.ribtio~to life on earth and need not
- -r - - .afaitodie."

4

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