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May 23, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-05-23

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Page 10-Friday, May 23, 1980-The Mich

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Do a Tree
a Favor:
Recyle
Your Daily

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HIGHWAY 504 NEAR Toutle, Washington has a new junction since a mud flow from the Mount St. Helens eruption washed
away the road Wednesday.
SAYS CLEANUP WILL MEAN BUDGET ADDITIONS:
Carter visits volcano site

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From AP and UPI
PORTLAND, Ore. - President Car-
ter flew by helicopter through rain and
snow yesterday to see for himself the
"literally indescribable" effect of the
10-megaton volcanic blast that ripped
the top off Mount St. Helens.
"Someone described it as a moon-
scape," Carter later told reporters,
"but the moon looks like a golf course
compared to what's up there. The
devastation is much greater than I had
ever dreamed."
THE PRESIDENT said the federal'
share of cleanup costs will force ad-
ditions to his budget. He said the 150-
square miles of once. verdant forest
turned into a morass of tangled trees
and volcanic ash was unbelievable and
"the worst thing I have ever seen."
Carter flew to the mountain in an off-
the-shelf Marine helicopter that dipped
at times to within 200 feet of the scarred
earth.
Just hours before his tour, thee
small earthquakes - the largest
measuring 3.1 on the Richter scale -
shook the mountain, and scientists said
there apparently was some movement
of molten rock deep underground Wed-

nesday night.
CARTER WAS flown within three
miles of the summit of the mountain,
but never saw it because of low-lying
clouds.
The president also stopped briefly at
an evacuation center in Longview,
Wash., where residents of the moun-
tain's base were taken because of
possible flood danger. The 50,000
residents of Longview and Kelso were

themselves placed on evacuation alert
for a time earlier in the week because of
flood warnings.
Carter met with a number of local
eastern Washington officials to get
their assessment of the fallout damage
and talk to them about federal disaster
aid. The'president said there will "un-
doubtedly be some damage to
agriculture," but he said rainfall over-
night has alleviated conditions
somewhat.

Gov, state leaders
tentative OK cutback
LANSING (UPI)-Gov. William propriating committees next V
Milliken and legislative leaders agreed nesday, officials said. Those pa
yesterday on tentative details of an must approve the reductions.
immediate $100 million state spending Milliken ruled out any additional
cut, but government figures cited later this summer in the state's alr
possible sunshine in Michigan's over- pared down budget, but said reduct
cast economy. remain under consideration for the
The budget cut plan will be finalized fiscal year which begins in October.
in negotiations over the next few days The governor also, however,c
and presented to the legislative ap- figures showing Michigan inflation

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wed-
nels
cuts
eady
tions
1981
cited
fell

I FR. and SA.12:00 mid. I

Thatre Lbda presents
DRAG
A musical celebrating the art of
female impersonation
May 29, 30,31 -8 p.m.-$3
June 1-2 p.m.-$2
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER

below the double digit level in March.
The spending cut plan calls for $35
milion from aid to local school districts,
$6.9 million from appropritions for
universities, and $10 million from
public assistance payments. In ad-
dition, $20 million will be cut from the
budgets of various state departments,
with all but four taking a cut of about 2
per cent.
The state prison system, mental
health department, state police, and
social services will absorb smaller than
average cuts.

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