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May 22, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-05-22

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Page l0-Thursday, Mciy 22, 1980-The Michigan Daily
90 MISSING, DEATH TOLL RISES
Washington major disaster area

q

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) -
President Carter declared the state of
Washington a major disaster area
yesterday and then flew to the Pacific
Northwest to personally inspect the
awesome destruction wrought by
Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruption.
Bad weather grounded rescue
helicopters searching for the estimated
90 people reported missing near the
volcano, which exploded Sunday with a
force estimated at 2,500 times as power-
ful as the atomic bomb dropped on
Hiroshima.
THE U.S. FOREST Service raised
the number of dead to 14, but the state
Department of Emergency Services
would only confirm 10 deaths.
The heavy rain and drizzle also ob-
scured a lake formed on the Toutle
River by rubble from the eruption.
Geologists earlier had feared the dam
of debris would collapse and that two
square miles of water 200 feet deep
would crash down on two small cities
with 50,000 residents.
Carter announced the disaster
designation shortly before leaving the
White House on a flight to Portland,
Ore., about 40 miles from the volcano.
He landed last night and planned to in-
spect the area in southwestern
Washington today.
BUT METEOROLOGIST Ron Sur-
face predicted clouds obscuring the
8,377-foot peak - 1,300 feet was chop-
ped off in the blast - would make it
"very unlikely that the mountain will
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be visible for viewing."
Carter's action will permit the use of
federal funds in relief and recovery ef-
forts in designated areas of the state.
The president also announced that a
team of scientists is being formed to
study the eruption and its effects on
people and their environment. The
team, to be located in Vancouver, will

assistant director of the U.S. Geologic
Survey.
THE NUMBER of missing persons
varied as officials checked duplications
and got new reports. Early yesterday,
authorities revised the number down-
ward from 98 to 71, then later in the day
raised it to90.
Skamamia County Sheriff Bill
Closner said people were in the danger

areas around the mountain because
they refused to obey roadblocks.
Cowlitz County Sheriff Les Nelson
said the death toll was expected to
climb much higher. A search and
rescue task force was being set up in
Toledo, 35 miles northwest of the
volcano, but poor weather hampered
their efforts.

I

a

TWO VICTIMS OF the Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption are found dead inside their camper, just north of Spirit Lake,
on Tuesday. Officials speculate the victims were campers trying to watch the eruption, but were overcome by poisonous
gases.
150,000 take S. Korean city
(Continued from Pagei) with signs demanding the resignation of Kwangju, a city of 800,000 about 150
The military estimated the number of military strongman Lt. Gen. Chun Doo- miles south of Seoul, to try to incite
demonstrators at 150,000. Other hwan, the release of jailed dissident more riots, the command said.
estimates placed the number on the leader Kim Dae-jung, who was born Streets were filled with rocks, glass,
streets at more than 200,000. near here, and the immediate lifting of and other debris, with wrecked cars
The protesters controlled most of the martial law, which was extended last and buses smoldering. All offices and
city, with soldiers and riot police Sunday. shops were closed.
grouped in a few locations, including Other vehicles had signs appealing The martial law command has
the government building and a univer- for blood donations for the hundreds of acknowledged six deaths over the four
sity. injured at local hospitals. Some days-one civilian and five soldiers or
SOME DEMONSTRATORS wore protesters took commandeered trucks policemen killed Tuesday.
police helmets and other police gear. and buses into communities, near
People drove commandeered buses,
trucks, and army vehicles plastered

/

STRUGGLE FOR JUSTICE
IN LATIN AMERICA
May 21-7:30 p.m.: CUBA
Members from the first "Christians for Socialism" delega-
tion from the U.S. to Cuba present the slide show, "Cuba,
Revolution of Promise and Challenge." The show includes a
brief Cuban history, information on economic planning and
social institutions and insights on the role of Christians in the
revolution.
PLACE: Lounge of St. Mary's - Newman Center
Corner of William and Thompson
Ann Arbor, Mi.
SPONSORED BY:
-St. Mary's Student Chapel
-interfaith Council for Peace
-Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights in Latin America
-Office of Ethics and Religion
S-OUkE- IN VTED

Michigan House ratifies
first of divestment bills

40

(ConinuedfromPage3)
argue recently against the University
divesting on its own initiative, but in
favor of University divestiture if man-
dated by the state legislature.
Bullard called the popular takeover
in Zimbabwe "a result of government
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attitudes, economic pressure, and a
growing revolutionary movement
against the government in favor of
human rights."
Bullard said he expects a similar
takeover in South Africa, and hopes the
U.S. will get on what he calls the "right
side" of the issues before that takeover
occurs.
"Majority rule in South Africa will
come, we just don't know when. By
withdrawing the public funds that sup-
port (the apartheid system), the U.S.
should be on the side of majority rights.
National policy thus far has supported
apartheid," Bullard said.
He continued, "The divestment
movement can have a significant ef-
fect. We need to educate three groups:
corporate decision-makers, state'
department (officials), and American
political leaders.,"-,tv1

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