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May 16, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-05-16

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Page 8-Friday, May 16, 1980-The Michigan Daily
WANTS U.S. TO BREAK IMPASSE
Egypt halts autonomy talks

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CAIRO, Egypt (AP)-The govern-
ment of President Anwar Sadat, in a
sudden turnaround yesterday, decided
against resuming Palestinian
autonomy talks with Israel and called
for a new U.S. initiative to break the
impasse.
Minister of State for Foreign Affairs
Dr. Butros Ghali told a news conference
that a proposed Israeli law to make
East Jerusalem the capital of the
Jewish state had caused the Egyptian
change of heart on a quick resumption
of talks.
IN A SPEECH to Parliament on
Wednesday Sadat said he had agreed,
at the urging of President Carter, to
resume the negotiations that Egypt
broke off May 8. Delegations from
Israel, Egypt, and the United States
have been trying for almost a year to
work out a plan giving a degree of
autonomy to 1.2 million Palestinians
living in the Israeli-occupied West Bank
of the Jordan River and Gaza.
But Ghali said the Egyptian president
did not know of Israel's measure on
Jerusalem at the time of his speech.
Ghali termed the Israeli decision tan-
tamount to "annexation" of East
Jerusalem, which was captured from
Jordan in the 1967 Mideast war.
Ghali also said the Israeli settlement
policy and "intimidation" measures
followed by Israeli authorities in the
West Bank and Gaza were to blame for
the current crisis.
AT ISRAEL'S northern border.

Israeli troops mounted a security alert
after an abortive Palestinian terrorist
raid from Lebanon. Soldiers scoured
the area near Kibbutz Hanita, five miles
from the Mediterranean coast to ensure
no guerrillas slipped through during the
Wednesday night clash in which three
Arabs were killed.
The Israeli army command said
when the terrorists were intercepted
they were carrying pamphlets in-

dicating they intended to take hostages
and bargain for the freedom of im-
prisoned comrades.
The news conference at the Egyptian
Foreign Ministry followed by several
hours a meeting Sadat held with top ad-
visors to assess Egypt's position in the
Palestinian autonomy negotiations.
THE EGYPTIAN decision to delay
resumption of the talks indefnitely ap-
peared to make the May 26 target date

for agreement on autonomy all but im-
possible toachieve.
"We are ready to negotiate with
Israel but not in this atmosphere,"
Ghali told reporters. "We are in favor
of negotiations but we cannot have
negotiations in the face of the new ac-
complished fact."
Ghali urged the Americans to step
forward with new efforts to find com-
mon ground between the Israelis and

EGYPTIAN PRESIDENT ANWAR SADAT, left, speaks with the former Shah of Iran during a social visit at the I
Palace in Cairo yesterday. In a sudden turnaround from Sadat's agreement on Wednesday to resume negot
Egypt has announced it will withdraw from Palestinian autonomy talks with Israel.

WEST SIDE STORY
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West Germany will

I

Beverly Hills and
the civilized world
will never forget them
jHLu g p p L _

boycott'80
DUESSELDORF, West Germany (AP)
-The West German Olympic Commit-
tee voted yesterday-not to send a team
to the 1980 Moscow Olympics, the
strongest endorsement yet of President
Carter's call for an international
boycott.
Carter. termed the 59-40 vote "a
courageous decision," buta spokesman
for the Soviet organizers said it would
have "no effect."
"THE COMMITTEE, the West Ger-
man government, and the people of.
West Germany deserve the admiration
of all those throughout the world who
believe in peace and freedom and who
recognize that the achievement of these
goals sometimes requires painful
sacrifices," Carter said in a statement
released in Washington.
Vitaly Smirnov, deputy chief of the
Moscow Olympic Organizing commit-
tee, said he was "disappointed" by the
West German vote. He added, "For me
there is no doubt that the decision was

Olympics
made under government pressure. The
administration of the United States of
America had its effect on the German
government."
He said the boycott "will have no ef-
fect at all" on the Games.
THE WEST. GERMAN government,
in thanking the committee for its en-
dorsement of the official position, noted
the sacrifices of' athletes who have-
trained only to see their Olympic hopes
shattered by the world reaction to the
Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.
Spokesman Klaus Boelling said the
government of Chancellor Helmut
Schmidt recognized the boycott was a
severe blow to the "athletes who have
trained for years and made numerous
personal sacrifices."
The vote followed a four-hour,
nationally televised debate. Committee
chairman Willi Daume, in announcing
the secret vote, said: "We must carry it
out together. We must live with it
together."

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TOMORROW: BEATLES' NIGHT

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