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May 14, 1980 - Image 15

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-05-14

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, May 14, 1980-Page 15
CALL FOR END TO MARTIAL LAW
Korean students battle police

SEOUL, South Korea (AP)-An
estimated 1,500 slogan-chanting studen-
ts demanding an end to martial law bat-
tled riot police late into the night here
yesterday.
Meanwhile, South Korean officials
studied intelligence reports of unusual
North Korean military actions above
the truce zone only 25 miles to the north
of the capital city.
STUDENT DEMONSTRATIONS,
which began early this month in Seoul
and several provincial cities, gained
momentum yesterday after a weekend
lull. The students, have echoed op-
position demands that the government
promptly carry out promised
democratic reforms and end martial-
law rule.
Yesterday's protest was one of-the
most successful street demonstrations
held since martial law was imposed af-
ter the assassination of President Park
Chung-hee in October of last year. The
students were able to march through
busy downtown streets for about an
hour before being overpowered by riot
police.
More than 500 helmeted riot police
scuffled with demonstrators on dimly-

lit streets only about 500 yards from the
capitol building. Eyewitnesses said a
few dozen demonstrations were put in
police vehicles, but it was not known
how many were arrested.
THOUSANDS OF STUDENTS at 13
universities and colleges in the
capital held noisy campus rallies
earlier yesterday to demand
democratic reforms in defiance of
repeated calls from the government for
self-restraint.
Meanwhile, North Korea charged
that American troops committed a
"serious provocative act" Monday by
firing across the demilitarized zone
(DMZ) that divides North and South
Korea. U.S. officials said a U.S. Army
patrol exchanged small-arms fire with
"unknown individuals" along the DMZ.
No casualties were reported and one
source characteried the incident as
"minor."
South Korea's 60,000-member police
force was placed on alert as Seoul rang
with rumors that government in-
telligence had reported unusual North
Korean army moves, including an
alleged plan to attempt a limited in-
vasion of the South between May 15-20.

THERE WAS NO official word on the
intelligence reports on North Korea,
but a number of meetings apparently
related to the reports took place.
U.S. Ambassador William Gleysteen
met with two opposition leaders, and
defense minister Choo Young-bok con-
ferred with Gen. John A. Wickham,
commander of all U.S. forces in Korea.
Prime Minister Shin Hyon-hwack
briefed a group of senior Korean editors
on security matters, and sent aides to
brief ruling party leader Kim Jong-pil
and opposition leader Kim Young-sam
on the same matters.
PRESIDENT CHO KYU-HAH was
in the Middle East seeking oil and other
economic benefits for the country's
sagging economy.
At Yonsei University, a prestigious
Christian-financed school, about 4,000

students demanded the immediate lif-
ting of martial law and the resignation
of Lt. Gen. Chun Doo-gwan, director of
the Korean Central Intelligence Agen-
cy.
Many of them later poured out of the
campus and engaged in rock-hurling
battles with police who countered with
tear gas.
At Korea University, another major
private school, about 8,000 students
held a rally, and about half of them
joined in a torch-carrying protest mar-
ch on the campus after dark.
The country has been under martial
law since Oct. 26, 1979 when President
Park Chung-hee was assassinated by
his intelligence chief, ending his 18-year
rule. The government has said it could
not lift martial law until social stability
was fully restored.

Carter, Reagan win
Maryland primary;
Reagi~n wins i*n Neb.

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

1

(Continued from Page 14)
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(Continued from Page 1)
And on the Republican side:
" Reagan 18,135 or 54 per cent and 21
delegates.
* Bush 11,801 or 35 per cent and six
delegates.
REP. JOHN Anderson, of Illinois,
who was on the GOP ballot even though
he is now running as an independent,
was drawing nine per cent of the
Republican vote. The other votes were
scattered among minor and dropout
candidates.
The Democratic delegates were
awarded in proportion to the popular
vote by congressional districts. The
Republicans were winner-take-all
within each district.
Yesterday's contests were in-
stallments that could not decisively
alter the campaigns and voter turnout
was reported light. In Lincoldn, Neb.,
an election official commented: "It
looks like there's no interest."
A KENNEDY spokesman, Edward
Martin, said Kennedy's prospects were
best in Maryland, but called the com-

petition uphill in both primary states.
The Carter camp was concerned
about the light turnout. White House
press secretary Jody Powell said, "that
generally has tended to work to our
disadvantage," contending that Ken-
nedy voters are more, ideologically
motivated than Carter's and thus are
more apt to vote.
KENNEDY WAS campaigning
yesterday in California for the biggest,
and last of the Democratic primaries,
on June 3. He described the state as one
he "has to win," but vowed to maintain
his candidacy through the convention
no matter what happens in the final 15
primaries.
"I'm going to the convention. My
name will be submitted for the
nomination and we'll call the roll," he
said.
Reagan was the pollsters' landslide
favorite in Nebraska, and Republican
leaders in Maryland said they expected
the former California governor to win
there, too.

W4I-A1 THE 1/L11IMAT7E 94LET7~x WORD
FOR 7rME M0/E T74AT Cc3L)p cGIVE
ANYOIEOVR 21 A STnoC?

Use Daily
Classifieds._

CoM/N6 5GOOV 7 A T/FEATRE NEA4R YU'
- . - , .- &019w BRHV i~p41W40 TJQ 14 ..

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