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September 04, 2014 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-09-04

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Thursday, September 4,2014mmichhgandallycom
ADMINISTRATION
Search for
new execs.
continues
intothe fall

Rackham student Adrianne Muntz speaks at a forum about the unrest in Fi
Students ,di

iss Ferguson

School of Social
Work hosts forum
to discuss Michael
Brown shooting
By EMILIE PLESSET
Daily StaffReporter
After weeks of nationwide
coverage of the turmoil in Fer-
guson, Mo. over the controver-
sial shooting of Michael Brown,
the University's Community
Organization Learning Com-
munity along with the Commu-

nity Action and Social Change
minor program hosted about 90
students and faculty Wednes-
day to discuss race relations in
light of the protests..
Students gathered for the
interactive forum and were
given the chance to exchange
thoughts, concerns and discuss
possible ways forward from
Brown's death.
Brown, a Black teenager, was
shot and killed by Ferguson
police officer Darren Wilson,
who is white, on Aug. 9. The
details of the incident are still
under investigation. However,
Brown was unarmed, alleg-

edly, and in response Ferguson
residents took to the streets to
protest violent police practices
Black citizens.
Protests continued after a
portion of the demonstrators
lootedalocalconvenience store.
Ferguson police employed riot
gear and armored vehicles to
contain the protests. The situ-
ation has sparked national dis-
cussion on the use of excessive
force by police officers and sys-
temic prejudice against young
Black men.
Wednesday's forum began
with faculty members shar-
ing their reactions to the inci-

dent. Among the speakers was
Desmond Patton, an assistant
professor of social work and
assistant professor of informa-
tion, who discussed his recent
visit to Ferguson. While he
did witness the protests in the
street, he also saw the other
areas of the neighborhood liv-
ing peacefully, offering him
a unique perspective on the
town.
"What I saw was not what
you all see on the news," Patton
said. "After I came back I knew
we had to have a discussion in
the School of Social Work. We
See FERGUSON, Page 2A

By SHOHAM GEVA
Daily StaffReporter
As University President Mark
Schlissel heads into his first year,
he may not be the only new face in
the administration for long.
Two executive committees,
one formed in May and one in
August, are currently searching
for replacements for Ora Pesco-
vitz, former executive vice presi-
dent for medical affairs and CEO
of the University of Michigan
Health System, and Timothy Slot-
tow, former University executive
vice president and chief financial
officer. Both announced earlier
this year that they would be step-
ping down.
There are 13 executive officers
in total at the University. Of those,
10 hold permanent positions. The

remaining three are interim CFO
Douglas Strong, interim EVPMA
Dr. Michael Johns and 'S. Jack
Hu, interim vice president for
research.
The EVPMA search committee,
formed in May, is further along in
the search process than the CFO
committee. Dr. Paul Lee, direc-
tor of the Kellogg Eye Center and
chair of the EVPMA committee,
said the search has been going
well thus far, and he's been pleased
with its progress.
Over the past few months the
EVPMA committee has hosted
public forums with groups such
as UMHS faculty and staff, and
has met with other groups across
the University that are impacted
by the position. Lee said the com-
mittee is now finished with that
phase, though it is still accepting
feedback and nominations.
"It was wonderful to hear the
degree of focus from all the people
who participated on what's good
for the University of Michigan as
an organization, what's good for
the patients and family who trust
See SEARCH, Page 2A

F CAMPUS LIFE
'Take back the
RC' reaches
an agreement

Mural painting
to continue with
approval from arts
coordinator
By MICHAEL SUGERMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Last semester, a small group
of students in the Residen-
tial College, one of East Quad
Residence Hall's learning com-
munities, wrote a quote on the
white wall of the building's
basement. When maintenance
staff painted over the "mural,"
a movement started: "Take
Back the RC" - an effort to
assert student ownership of the
learning community.
The movement was strong,
enough to elicit a response
from the RC's administration,
members of which met with
students in mid-April to discuss
solutions to the problem.
Now, that solution has
arrived in the form of a four-
page document titled "Art in
East Quad: Policies and Pro-
cedures." Drafted during the

summer, the guide requires any
resident of East Quad - not just
the RC - to propose public art
projects to a new arts coordina-
tor, who will help to evaluate
available space and potential
maintenance concerns before
approving potential works.
The document encourages
students to consult with the
coordinator early during the
fall semester, though additional
requests may be accepted on a
rolling basis.
The criteria for artwork will
include "contribution to the
educational purposes of the
University," in addition to its
"aesthetic quality" and "rela-
tive uniqueness," among other
factors.
RC Acting Director Charles
Bright, who worked with Uni-
versity Housing to draft the
new policy, said it is the best
of both worlds - combining
the priorities of dorm residents
with projects potentially gener-
ated through art classes housed
in East Quad.
"Truth be told, people need
to own the spaces they live in,"
Bright said. "They need to feel
See RC, Page 2A

ANN ARBOR
City DDA
meeting
canceled
Social gathering
leads to unintended
legal conflict
By WILL GREENBERG
Daily News Editor
Due to an unfortunate over-
sight, the Ann Arbor Down-
town Development Authority
lost a night out for drinks.
The DDA canceled a sched-
uled meeting Wednesday night
after two Michigan Daily
reporters were denied entry to
the scheduled venue. The city's
official online calendar listed
a DDA meeting for Wednesday
as a "DDA Chair's Gathering"
at Bill's Beer Garden oh Ashley
Street. However, the restaurant
only allows customers of legal
drinking age, unless a parent
accompanies them.
DDA Executive Director
Susan Pollay said the gathering
was only intended to be a social
event. They decided to post the
meeting online in case there
was a full quorum and she said
it was not intended to include
See DDA, Page 2A

TED STYLE

Haji Noor Deen Mi Guang Jiang, a master calligrapher, speaks about his unique style in Angell Hall Wednesday.
MAYORAL ELECTION
After winning primary, Taylor
focused on eneral election

D
I

emocrat to face Christopher Taylor (D-Ward 3),'
who won the Democratic pri-
ndependent for mary last month, against inde-
pendent candidate Bryan Kelly.
mayoral seat While the party affiliation
of Ann Arbor's mayor has con-
By EMMA KERR sistently alternated' between
Daily StaffReporter Republican and Democratic
candidates since 1965, no inde-
n Arbor's mayoral race has pendent candidate has success-
ied a standstill. fully won the seat in the last 50
rrently, there are no offi- years.
debates scheduled leading "The math of it is not posi-
the general election, which tive, and that's kind of why I'm
pit City Council member trying to run it more of a cam-

paign that is beneficial to soci-
ety," Kelly said.
Taylor thanked voters on his
campaign website following the
primary and expressed contin-
ued focus on the city's future,
saying he is now looking toward
the general election and his
time as mayor if elected.
"I am honored and humbled
by last night's victory," Taylor
wrote. "Now the hard work, the
important work, begins. I am so
excited to get started."
See VOTING, Page 2A

An
reach
Cu
cial
up to
will

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INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No.121
©2014 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily~com

NEWS.........................2A SPORTS .................4A
SUDOKU .....................2A CLASSIFIEDS ...............6A
OPINION...................3A B-SIDE ....................18.

A

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