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2A - Wednesday, November 26, 2014

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com 4

------ - ------

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
PETER SHAHIN DOUGLAS SOLOMON
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-4s8-4y15 ext. 1251 734-418-4115 ext 1241
pjshahin@michigundailycom dourgsolo@michigandailyeom

HEALING SPACE

Amid scandal, UVA students speak

Student leaders at the Univer-
sity of Virginia held a press con-
ference Monday to address media
attention that has placed the uni-
versity's sexual assault response
procedures under heightened
scrutiny, The Cavalier Daily
reported Monday.
A recent Rolling Stone article,
profiling a sexual assault survi-
vor within the school's Greek Life
community catalyzed the press
conference.
"We recognize that sexual vio-
lence is a problem in our fraterni-
ties and we recognize that we as
students can be catalysts for the
solution," Interfraternity Council
President Tommy Reid stated dur-
ing the press conference.

Georgetown student organiza-
tions receive financialsupport
Ninety-eight student organi-
zations requested a combined
$350,000 at Georgetown Universi-
ty's Student Activities Commission
summit, The Hoya reported Tues-
day. The SAC allocated $146,000to
the groups.
SAC Chair Patrick Musgrave
estimated that the groups request-
ed $300,000 at the previous sum-
mit and there was an obvious
increase between the two years.
"The fundamental flaw ofSAC is
that the more you ask for the more
youget,"Musgravesaid."We'renot
subjective, really, we follow very
objective funding procedures."

AMANUA ALLtN/Daily
Kinesiology junior Capri'Nara Kendall soeaks at a
Healing Space created by BSU to discuss issues of
race in Angell Hall Tuesday.

e
WO mic tl an at ya m

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

SPO RT S
Basketball
BY LEY FACHER

N D MHealthy MTango
Avatar Movie stressbreak beginners
BY JACOB RICH

PSU senior earns Marshall
Scholarship honors
Ryan Henrici, a Pennsylvania
State University student, is the
recipient of the prestigious Mar-
shall Scholarship, a program that
allows students to study in the
United Kingdom, The Penn State
News reported Monday.
Henrici, an Honors College
senior, will study malaria at the
London School of Hygiene and
Tropical Medicine, a subdivision
of the University of London.
Ruth Mendum, director of the
University Fellowships Office at
Penn State, stressed the value of
the scholarship.
- CARLYNOAH
TH REE T HINGS YOU
SH OULD KNOW TODAY
Police arrested 61 pro-
testers in Ferguson, Mis-
souri last night, The St.
Louis Post-Disatch reported
Tuesday. Many protesters
smashed windows and set
buildings and police cars on
fire. Police threw tear gas to
disperse the crowds.
s
This week, The
Statement Magazine
looks at the culture of
student activismas it becomes
increasingly dependent on
digital and social media on
college campuses across the
country.
* FOR MORE, SEE STATEMENT, PG. 1B
Florida high school
studentAlexa Nicole De
Armas was arrested for
human trafficking of minors
and running a prostitution
ring, The Florida Herald-
Tribune reported Tuesday.
Police say she organized at
least three prostitution deals.

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4

4

The 60-55 loss to Whether you loved it or
Villanova wasn't ideal for the hated it, we invite you to
thousands of Michigan fans look back at James Cam-
who poured into Brooklyn, eron's "Avatar," the movie
but they came out with that captivated and polar-
signs to create a postseason ized audiences and grossed
atmosphere nonetheless on $2.79 billion worldwide in
the road that was loud all the 2009 before this season's
way until the end. new releases hit the screen.
NEWS VIDEO

Fire's burnin'
BY WILL GREENBERG
The city of Ann Arbor has
filled its vacant fire chief
spot with Larry Collins.
He previously was the Bre-
vard County Fire-Rescuse
chief from 2009 to 2014 in
Florida. He also served 30
years with the Dayton Fire
Department. The position.
has been vacant since Jan.

Protest report
BY KAYLLA CANTILINA
Students and commu-
nity members protested the
grand jury's decision on Fer-
guson, MO yesterday. Sever-
al student organizations and
individuals gathered at the
Diag and then marched to
City Hall, where some advo-
cated for peacable protests
and social change.

WHAT: Students can take
a stress break and relax
by listening to music and
learning about science.
WHO: University Human
Resources
WHEN: Today from 3:30
p.m. to 4 p.m.
WHERE: Museum of Natu-
ral History Planetarium
Brown Bag
recital
WHAT: Local musicians
Andrew Meagher and Kathy
Ball will perform organ solo
music. The musicians will
perform music by Bach,
Purcell and Vivaldi, among
others.
WHO: School of Music,
Theatre & Dance
WHEN: Today at 12:15 p.m.
WHERE: School of
Public Health Building,
Community Room

WHAT: MTango will offer
beginners an intensive class
in Argentine tango. No part-
ner or prior experience is
needed.
WHO: MTango, Maize
Pages Student Organization:
WHEN: Today from 8p.m.
to 9:30 p.m.
WHERE: Mason Hall
Workout
WHAT: Student organi-
zation REVIVE inviting
students to partake in the
Insanity Workout.
WHO: REVIVE, Maize
Pages Student Organiza-
toins
WHEN: Today at 8:30 a.m.
WHERE: Central Campus
Recreation Building
CORRECTIONS
. Pleasereportanyerror
insthe Dailygto correc-
tions@michigandailycom,

SENIOR NEWSEDITORSIanDillingham, Sam Gringlas,WillGreenberg,Rachel Premack
and StphnfiShenouda
ASSISns NE WSITORS: Allana Akhmr, Neal Berkowski, Claire Bryan, Shoham
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VIEOEDITORS Paula Friedich and James ReslierWellscignaiy~o
SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR: Brianne Johnson
BUSINESS STAFF
Madeline Lacey University Accounts Manager
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Nolan Loh Special Projects Coordinator
Jason Anterasian FinanceManager

a

s

Panel discusses social science research

Experts talk open
data, information
sharing among
researchers
By QUAN NGUYEN
Daily StaffReporter
Emphasizing the impor-
tance of open access to data,
three University professors
discussed the future of social
science research in a panel
held in the Hatcher Graduate
Library on Thursday.
The panelists invited to
present their suggestions
included Psychology Prof.
Nick Ellis, Assistant History
Prof. Michelle McClellan and
History Prof. George Alter.
Ellis, who is also an editor
for the Language Learning
Journal, discussed the pub-
lication's negotiations with
Wiley, it's publisher, to enable
more hon-Wiley subscribers
to obtain access to research

methods and data reports of
past social science research
projects.
"Wiley is more interested in
the business model than they
are in making us open around
the world," he said. "We have
negotiations with them about
them subsidizing republica-
tion and re-issue in China and
India.Itis an interestingnego-
tiation."
Similarly, Alter concen-
trated on research trans-
parency throughout the
majority of his presentation
due to his position as the
director of the Inter-univer-
sity Consortium for Political
and Social Research. He said
promoting research transpar-
ency would resolve some of
the most frequent criticisms
directed toward research-
ers. Common problems derive
from research that is difficult
to replicate, fraudulent cases
and projects incentivized by
profit.
He said the ICPR must first
earn the trust of data produc-

ers and the public, and provide
documentation about where
and how data is created.
Alter added that even
though Congress and other
national agencies have recent-
ly expressed support for data
transparency for federally
funded projects, data restric-
tions are still an obstacle for
many researchers due to pri-
vacy concerns.
He also credited the new
form of data to the growing
forms of technology such as
Facebook, smartphones, Twit-
ter, hospitals' online archives
of patients' histories and
even credit card transactions.
Alter concluded his presenta-
tion anticipating how social
research projects will search
for new ways to strike a bal-
ance between private and open
data.
While both expressed trans-
parency as a pillar for suc-
cessful future social science
research projects, McClellan
targeted her speech toward
transparency between pro-
=fessionals of different disci-

en's Studies Prof. Beth Glover
Reed, on gender and addiction.
She specializes in alcoholism
in women.
As a veteran interdisciplin-
ary researcher, McClellan
advised the audience to "undo"
their past understandings and
avoid assumptions when team-
ing up with researchers from
other disciplines. She humor-
ously recalled how she once
mistakenly thought the testing
subjects were humans because
Becker referred to lab rats as
simply male and female.
"Not only we did not know
what we were talking about,
(but) in some way, it is even
more dangerous because we
thought we knew what we
were talking about to one
another," she said.
In an interview with The
Michigan Daily, McClellan
said she wants to incorporate
social science knowledge into
natural science research to
alleviate public confusion over
the results scientists present
in their findings.
"We are trying to publish
something in the scientific
journal that says trying to pay
attention to the context of how
your ideas are being under-
stood," she said.

ENDOWMENT
From Page 1A
individual donations depends on
the donor.
"For example, having just talk-
ed with development, we know
that, toward that $1 billion goal
for student support, donors have
given about $400 million so far,
so almost halfway to that goal,"
Fitzgerald said. "Most of that is
donations that are gifts that will go
into the endowment, so that they'll
be invested."
Donations outside that fundrais-
ing push may be invested directly
into specific projects, such as Uni-
versity alum Charles Munger's
$110 million donation, which allo-
cated money for the construction
of graduate student housing.
Castilla and Fitzgerald said, on
average, the University spends 4.5
percent of investment proceeds,
leavingthe rest to grow the endow-
ment.
As to why the endowment has
grown so quickly, even in just the
last year, Castilla said it's a matter
of compensating for the decrease of
public funds.
"Once upon a time, many
decades ago, the University of
Michigan was mainly funded
by the state," Castilla said. "The
composition of that funding has
changed over time. Everybody
knows that the state has cut back
on funding over time, but the cost
of giving an education has gone up
also."
The state of Michigan provides
16 percent of the University's
general fund budget, according
to University budget reports. In
comparison, it was 78 percent in
1960, so the drop has provided the
impetus for the need to expand
the endowment, raise tuition and
encourage donations.
As recently as 1990, tuition and
fees and state support provided
equal contributions to the Univer-
sity.
For this reason, expanding the
endowment has been critical for
funding all facets of the Univer-
sity. Fitzgerald said if the endow-
ment didn't grow, costs like tuition
would increase at higher rates.
Some might say the constantly
expanding endowment is a sign
that the University operates like
a private company, rather than

a non-profit, public educational
institution. Fitzgerald said the
opposite is true.
"It's really acting like a prudent
investor for the funds that have
been provided by the donors,"
Fitzgerald said. "And we want to
maximize those donor dollars to
do the most good across campus
for the educational benefit of our
students as possible."
Castilla also underlined that,
while the University has the high-
est endowment of any public insti-
tution, it's 94th on a per-student
basis.
"One thing to keep in mind,
and a lot of people don't realize,
but I think it's really important to
understand ... although the dollar
amounts seem very large, the Uni-
versity is so large that if you look
at it on a per student basis, we're
really only roughly speaking about
the 100th largest endowment in
the country," Castilla said.
The investments, Part I:
Private equity and strategies
Beyond the role and meaning of
the endowment, a quick glance at
the investment report doesn't nec-
essarily articulate how the Univer-
sity invests its money.
The firms listed in the longterm
portfolio are scattered across the
nation and globe, though many
seem to be in Palo Alto, New York
and China. Adding to this confu-
sion is that the companies are all
focused in capital, management
and equity, not typical "stocks."
That's because they're not
stocks at all. Castilla highlighted
that the University never directly
invests in individual stocks, bonds,
mutual funds and other types of
properties.
Instead, its system of invest-
ing has numerous layers, and the
easiest way to explain the format
is that the Investment Office gives
money to other firms to invest on
the University's behalf.
"What we do is we pick man-
agers in certain sectors," Castilla
said. "We give them pieces of the
endowment, and then they make
the specific investments."
"We're saying, here's some U
of M money; you invest it in these
kinds of companies that you're
really good at investing," Fitzger-
ald said. "All of these companies
that are listed in the report are
investment companies that work
See ENDOWMENT, Page 3A

.. ------.- -

Uplines and the public.
McClellan is currently
collaborating with Jill Beck-
er, professor of psychology
and psychiatry, and Wom-

HAPPY
THANKSGIVING
FROM THE MICHIGAN DAILY
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