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November 19, 2014 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-11-19

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

michigandailycom

CAMPUS LIFE
Panel talks
feminism on
the Internet,
in new media
Women in were pleased to see.
"We had no idea what to
Technology event expect," said Emily Puckett
Rodgers, entrepreneurship pro-
examines gender gram manager for the School of
Information. "We just shared
roles online this as broadly as we could, and
I think this shows that this is a
By EMMA KINERY conversation that's happening
Daily StaffReporter on campus and this is a con-
versation that we can continue.
The School of Information's As we move from learners into
entrepreneurship program and professionals, I think that we
the University's chapter of the can take these experiences, this
American Library Association critical thinking and these skills
hosted a panel Thursday high- with us."
lighting women in technology. During the panel, Wuschitz
The event, held in North discussed why she chose to cre-
Quad, featured two prominent ate her own feminist hacker-
feminist technologists, Stefanie space - spaces where people
Wuschitz, founder of a feminist with interests in technology,
hackerspace in Vienna, and Lisa computing and science can col-
Nakamura, co-facilitator of Fem- laborate and socialize.
TechNet and the University's She said hackerspaces are
coordinator of digital studies. often almost all male and not
Both discussed the grow- always comforting, alluding
ing role of women in the digi- to a time when one of the best
tal realm, the issue of gender programmers in Austria and a
over the Internet and feminist cofounder of the all-female hack-
approaches to combatting dis- erspace was sexually harassed in
crimination in these areas. a hackerspace.
Though the panel was female- "So that was a moment for
centric, the audience was com- me when I thought, we need
prisedofbothmales and females, our own space." Wuschitz said.
which the coordinators said they See WOMEN,-Page 3A

Report shows mixed
results on alcohol use

comeweeks

the Aftermath

2013 vs. 2014
ON CAMPUS

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8

imbulclnce requests 75
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On campus emergency
calls decrease while
off campus sees
higher enforcement
By MAX RADWIN
Daily StaffReporter
Like many freshmen during
the 2014 Welcome Week, the
,first home game against Appa-

lachian State University was
not only University President
Mark Schlissel's first exposure
to Michigan football, but also to
the University's culture of alco-
hol consumption on campus. And
after seeingstudents drinking on
rooftops and struggling to stand
up, Schlissel said he was terrified.
Though Schlissel called
increasing alcohol safety a long-
term project, the University has
already taken steps to limit the
kind of unsafe alcohol activity he

witnessed first-hand that takes
place during Welcome Week,
which is known for promoting an
excessively unsafe drinking envi-
ronment.
However, the University's
efforts to quell drinking this year
had mixed results.
According to data compiled by
the University's Division of Pub-
lic Safety and Security, this year's
Welcome Week saw a general
decline in on-campus alcohol-
related activity, but an uptick

in off-campus neighborhoods.
The discrepancy may not reflect
a shift in drinking culture, but
rather increased enforcement of
underage drinking violations by
the University police compound-
ed with a shorter move-in period
for on-campus residents.
During an October SACUA
meeting, SACUA Chair Scott
Masten, a professor of business
economics and public policy
in the Ross School of Business,
See WELCOMEWEEK, Page 3A

ENTREPRENEURSHIP
'U'based
'startup
works in
Ghana
Sisu Global Health
provides medical
equipment to needy
communities
By LINDSEY SCULLEN
Daily StaffReporter
The word "sisu" is a Finnish
word used colloquially around
Michigan's Upper Peninsula. It
means, "resilience," "determi-
nation" or "perseverance in the
face of adversity." Appropriately,
Sisu Global Health lives up to its
tough name.
Sisu Global Health is a Mich-
igan-based, social venture and
medical device company that
provides medical equipment
in areas where technology is
scarce. Currently, the company's
focus is in Ghana.
See GHANA, Page 3A

BUSINESS
Technology company
director discusses
global businesses

ZACH MOORE/Daily
CSG President Bobby Dishell, a Public Policy senior, speaks at the CSG meeting at Pierpont Commons Tuesday.
CSG introdces resolutieon
to sponsor annual award

iXperience"founder
pitches international
internship program
BY ANASTASSIOS
ADAMOPOULOS
DailyStaffReporter
Students from the Ross
School of Business, StartUM
Entrepreneurship and TAMID
Israel Investment Group at Mich-
igan continued their missions to
encourage innovation on a global
scale, all while learning about
tech startups Tuesday.
Aaron Fuchs, founder and CEO
of the South African technology
startup iXperience, discussed his
experiences starting a technology
firmwith about40 students atthe
Business school.
"The whole concept around
iXperience is to help people get
the skills that they need to suc-
ceed in the digital world," Fuchs
said.
The event was also intended to
promote the company's summer
internship program. iXperinece
hosts an eight-week summer
internship program in Cape
Town, South Africa. During the

first four weeks, students focus
on coding hefore working on
technology projects with existing
South African companies.
Fuchs said the program was
created to meet the increasing
demand for technological infor-
mation in emerging markets,
where there are fewer opportuni-
ties for a technical education.
Fuchs, who grew up in south-
ern South Africa and said he
didn't come in contact with tech-
nology until he was 10 years old,
asked students to think about
their goals, assess their inspira-
tions and determine their life's
purpose.
"What do you love doing?" he
said. "What does the world need
to be abetter place? What can you
be paid for and what are you good
at? And where all these things
intersect, is where your find your
purpose exists and you can actu-
ally add so much more value to
whatever it is that you are doing."
He also encouraged students to
interact with people who inspire
and motivate them, aswell as find
mentorswho can share their own
experiences.
Fuchs noted that the most
important assets one could have
See STARTUP, Page 3A

Assembly gives
updates on WSN,
meetings with new
AD Hackett
By TANAZ AHMED
Daily StaffReporter
In a change of pace, Central
Student Government held its
meeting at Pierpont Commons

instead of the CSG chambers at
the Union Tuesday night. The
change was in accordance with
a resolution passed by CSG ear-
lier this year, which required
some CSG meetings to be held
at other University Unions in an
effort to increase its presence
around campus.
The Golden Apple Award, the
Wolverine Support Network
and relations with interim Ath-
letic Director Jim Hackett were
discussed during the meeting.

A resolution to sponsor the
2015 Golden Apple Award and
lecture was proposed by CSG
President Bobby Dishell, a Pub-
lic Policy senior, along with
finance committee chair Jacob
Ruby, an LSA junior, and finance
committee vice-chair Chris
McCurry, a Business sopho-
more.
The Golden Apple Award is
the only campus-wide, student-
nominated teaching honor. Pro-
See CSG, Page 3A

The Statement Magaine
A IL
A look at how theory and practice come togth
liberal arts curriculums
INSIDE

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