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November 17, 2014 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-11-17

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C \LEMATI NG OURONE-i UND IED TWENTY- FFTI YEAR O F EITOI AL FREEDOM

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, November 17,2014

michigandaily com

WINTER COMMENCEMENT
- Head of
NASA to
address
graduates

Charles F. Bolden,
former astronaut,
worked with 'U' to
promote sciences
By CLAIRE BRYAN
DailyStaff Reporter
This year's Winter Com-
mencement speaker is a man
who names both fictional
astronaut Buck Rogers and
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as
inspirations.
NASA Administrator
Charles F. Bolden, Jr. will be
the commencement's honorary
guest speaker, the University
announced early Monday.
The commencement cer-
emony will take place at 2 p.m.
on Sun., Dec. 14 at the Crisler
Center.
Under Bolden's leadership,
NASA has launched a space-
craft to Jupiter, landed a Mars
rover and enhanced Earth-
observingsatellites. NASA aims
to create U.S. vehicles to travel

to the International Space Sta
tion by 2017 and launch the
James Webh Space Telescope,
which has been created to suc-
ceed the Hubble Space Tele-
scope, by 2018.
President Barack Obama's
tenure has seen a fundamental
reorientation of NASA. Bolden
increased public-private part-
nerships during a time of major
budget cuts to NASA.
Bolden is the first Black
administrator of NASA.
Bolden is a veteran of four
spaceflights, two of which he
commanded. In 1990, he com-
manded Space Shuttle Discov-
ery and its deployment of the
Hubble Space Telescope, and
in 1994 he commanded the first
joint U.S. and Russian Space
Shuttle mission.
Born in Columbia, S.C.,
Bolden was captivated by the
adventures of fiction hero Buck
Rogers as a child.'
He graduated from the Unit-
ed States Naval Academy in
1968 with abachelor's degree in
electrical science. After gradu-
See NASA, Page 3A

EUGENE STAYT/Daily

Kineseology Prof. Rodney Fort speaks at The Values of College Sport Conference Saturday in Hatcher.
Conference oo at
role of'U athletics

SPORTS
Frank
Clark
jailed
inOhio
Defensive end
arrested on
domestic violence,
assault charges
JRY M"l ,CPJHEN
iy Spofts Editor
New details were reported
Sunday night regarding the
weekend arrest of Frank Clark,
a senior defensive end on the
Michigan football team.
Clark was booked into the
Erie County (Ohio) jail early
Sunday morning after being
charged with a domestic vio-
lence offense. An additional
charge of assault was added
later Sunday, according to
the Sandusky Register, which
obtained the police report
detailing the circumstances of
Clark's arrest.
Clark is slated to appear in
Sandusky Municipal Court on
Monday at 9a.m.
According to the report, the
incident took place while he
and his live-in girlfriend were
staying at Maui Sands Hotel
See CLARK, Page 3A

T
el
iss'
Stu
on th
Gradu
Satur.
has st
this w
Th
co-ho

heme Semester Semester, the School of Kinese-
ology, the University's Office of
vent highlights Research, Rackham Graduate
School and several departments
ies needing to be within LSA - featured keynote
addresses alongside specialized
addressed panels covering a variety of dis-
ciplines, including economics,
By MARGO LEVY well-being, education and ethics.
Daily StaffReporter The conference came as the
University faces key decisions
dents and faculty gathered about the future of its athlet-
e main floor of the Hatcher ics programs and closely fol-
iate Library on Friday and lows University President Mark
day to discuss a topic that Schlissel's candid statements
:irred debate across campus regarding the state of athletics
reek: intercollegiate sports. with the Senate Advisory Com-
e two-day conference - mittee on University Affairs last
sted by the LSA Theme Monday

"We admitstudents who aren't
as qualified, and it's probably
the kids that we admit that can't
honestly, even with lots of help,
do the amount of work and the
quality of work it takes to make
progression from year to year,"
Schlissel said Monday.
He later qualified his remarks
in an interview with The Michi-
ganDaily, clarifyingthat students
are admitted to the University
based on their expected ability to
succeed in its academic environ-
ment.
Event organizers said the
opportune scheduling was coin-
cidental, as planning for the con-
See CONFERENCE, Page 3A

LEARN ON TI1E FLY

ANN ARBOR
After 14 years, Hieftje leaves
lasting legacy on city policies

Ir
co
a

ROBERT DUNNE/Daily
Engineering junior Richard Nakkula and freshman Pascal Strumfels juggle at Miscellania's Crash Course
Convention, a workshop for students interested in new skills, Sunday at Palmer Commons.
CAMPUS LIFE
Data Dive gives students real-life
experience in interpreting data

Event encourages
skill-sharing
among participants
By EMMA KINERY
Daily StaffReporter
Students and Ann Arbor resi-
dents banded together with local
nonprofit organizations this
weekend to discover ways to

better interpret and use institu-
tional data in A2 Data Dive, an
annual community event.
Four nonprofits - SafeHouse
Center, Summer in the City,
Ozone House and 826michigan
- contributed institutional data
for the programmers to analyze.
The data provided was anony-
mous on an individual level. Data
Dive featured 102 volunteer pro-
grammers, consisting mostly of
graduate students in the School

of Information.
Jackie Cohen, A2 Data Dive
coordinator, said the emphasis
for the event this year - the
third time it has been held in
Ann Arbor- was to encourage
skill-sharing between partici-
pants. The event was founded'
by Nikki Roda and Claire Barco,
both 2013 graduates of the mas-
ter's program in the School
of Information. They were
See DATA, Page 3A

Tod
Arbor
years:
one ot
final t
standi
week,
city w
Christ
Tay
contir
tje es1
as ma
the vs
earlier
Hieftj
years,
years,
in agr
84 pe
2012.
on key
city r
infras
Hieftj
Son

Cooming mayor topics from 2014 include Hieftje
and Taylor's support of SPARK,
Taylor aims to a city-funded organization that
aims to increase economic devel-
ntinue Hieftje's opment in Ann Arbor; their deci-
2 sion to support the building plan
pproach to A2 of 413 E. Huron, a controversial
development decision made this
By EMMA KERR year; and their decision to vote
Daily StaffReporter against amending the city's cross-
walk ordinance, another key issue
lay will mark the first Ann that will return to the Council
City Council meeting in 14 under the sponsorship of Coun-
to be presided over by some- cilmember Steve Kunselman (D-
her than John Hieftje. As the Ward 3).
erm of Ann Arbor's longest- Despite the shift in leadership
ng mayor came to an end last and the addition of three new
a new chapter begins for the faces to the Council, Hieftje said
ith the succession of Mayor he believes Taylor's transition
opher Taylor. to the mayoral office will be a
lor, who ran on a platform of smooth one, adding that he isvery
"uing in the direction Hief- optimistic about the directionthe
;tblished during his time city is headed in.
yor, garnered 84 percent of "I think the city is in very good
ote in the general election shape," Hieftje said. "I wouldn't
r this month. His ties to want to trade budgets with any
e have been strong over the other city."
and during the past three "Our pension funds and our
Hieftje and Taylor were retirement funds have both got-
reement on approximately ten high grades from our auditors,
rcent of votes taken since and the city has very good job
It is likely Taylor's stances growth, which we found out dur-
y issues such as University- ing the recession," he added. "We
elations, development and had the lowest unemployment in
tructure will echo those of the state so the city appears to me
e. to be in pretty good shape."
ne of the more controversial Hieftje said though the Uni-

versity and city have had their
disagreements, their relationship
has continued to improve over the
years and city officials have been
able to communicate and work
well with University officials
about issues as they arise.
"We don't like it when the Uni-
versity takes property off of the
tax rolls, we don't like it when
they put up a giant electronic
billboard outside of the stadium,
the city doesn't allow those to be
built in the city limits but the Uni-
versity, of course, is above that,"
Hieftje said. "But what people
don't understand is that there are
many, many more areas where the
city and the University really do
cooperate."
When Hieftje ran for mayor
in 2000, heswas serving in his
first term us a councilmember.
Relatively new to Council, Hieftje
held his seat as mayor for seven
terms - longer than any mayor
has served in Ann Arbor's history.
He said his decision to continue
running for re-election stemmed
from his desire to see the initia-
tives he began through to comple-
tion, particularly in light of the
2008 recession.
"I turned out to be the lon-
gest-serving mayor and I hadn't
planned on that at all, but I think
See MAYOR, Page 3A

WEATHER
TOMORROW

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