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October 23, 2014 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-10-23

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1111,r 4'X N,. I)I.r II1) IN l Il LUI2L)'(H ,IILI)\

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, October 23, 2014

michigandailycom
CAMPUS LIFE
Protection
of Diag 'M'
- falls flat

L SA sophomore Lindsey Richmond lights a candle during the candlelight vigl held by the Sexual A ssault Prevention and Awareness Center on the Diag Wednes-
day. The vigil was held in honor of victims of intimate partner violence.
SAPAC holds candlel ght
vigil for violence surivors

Delay of annual
Theta Xi 'guard'
event made MSU
vandalism possible
By MICHAEL SUGERMAN
Daily Staff Reporter
For the last 14 years, the Theta
Xi fraternity has taken to Central
Campus during the week before
the Michigan State football game
to protect the sacred 'M' at the
center of the Diag from potential
East Lansingvandals.
Early Wednesday morning,
the 'M' was painted green, and
the 15th "Defend the Diag" effort
was stymied before it had even
begun. The letters "S" and "U"
were spray-painted in white
alongside theI'M' for full effect.
The block 'M' on Michigan's
campus has been painted green.
pic.twitter.com/lGFvnXeVbv-
Alejandro Zoniga (@ByAZuniga)
October 22, 2014
Theta Xi's "Defend the Diag"
initiative is currently scheduled
to start Thursday at 11 p.m. and
conclude Saturday at 8 a.m.
Diane Brown, spokeswoman
for the Division of Public Safety
and Security, said she was sur-

prised that the fraternity was
not guarding the Diag earlier, as
the event has occurred annually
since she began working at the
University.
She said defacing the 'M' con-
stitutes malicious destruction of
property, which would qualify in
this case as a misdemeanor pun-
ishable by up to 90 days in jail
and up to a $500 fine.
As to why the Theta Xi camp-
out was slated to start so late in
the week, rumors abound about
the reason forthe delay.
University alum Tyler Bern-
stein, a former Theta X1 brother,
wrote in a Facebook comment
that a "political rally" - possibly
in reference to the candlelight
vigil protesting domestic violence
held Wednesday night - conflict-
ed with "Defend the Diag." As a
result, Bernstein wrote, the fra-
ternity wasn't able to set up shop
until Thursday night.
Current members and leaders
of the Theta Xi fraternity did not
respond to requests for comment
on the alleged issue.
University spokesman Rick
Fitzgerald wrote in an e-mail
interview that the administra-
tion did not have involvement in
coordinating Theta Xi's "Defend
the Diag" event.
See DIAG, Page 6A

Ceremony honors
those affected by
partner abuse
By TOM MCBRIEN
Daily StaffReporter
Editor's note: This article con-
tains descriptions of intimate
partner violence that may be dis-
turbing to some readers. Students
can contact the Sexual Assault

Prevention and Awareness Cen-
ter at (734) 764-7771 or visit its
offices in North Quad. SAPAC
also has a 24-hour crisis line at
(734) 936-3333.
While frequent campus crime
alerts warn of aggressive sexual
assaults by strangers, the issue
of intimate partner violence is
common and not as easy to see,
though its effects can be just as
damaging.
Wednesday night, the Sexual

Assault Prevention and Aware-
ness Center held a vigil on the
Diag for those who have died as
a result of intimate partner vio-
lence. About 25 people attended
the vigil, listening to stories
about sexual assault, lighting
candles, reading a card mural
made by allies and survivors of
intimate partner violence, and
participating in a minute of
silence in honor of those who
have died. SAPAC, SafeHouse
Center and the School of Social

Work's New Visions organiza-
tion co-hosted the vigil.
LSA junior Anna Forringer-
Beal and LSA senior Katelyn
Maddock, co-coordinators for
the networking, publicity and
activism program at SAPAC,
said the vigil was meant to raise
awareness of the realities of
intimate partner violence and to
express support for survivors.
"It's hard to think about
intimate partner violence hap-
See SAPAC, Page 6A

GLOBAL HEALTH
Panel looks at
international
Ebola efforts

FERGUSON IN CONTEXT - ELECTIONS 2014

Public health
systems, religious
rites considered in
expert discussion
By PARISHA NOVA
For theDaily
The International Institute
hosted a roundtable Wednes-
day exploring the multifaceted
impacts of the deadly Ebola virus
that has led to the deaths of more
than 4,500 people across several
West African countries in recent
months. The panelists discussed
the causes and consequences of
the epidemic from both a local
and global perspective.
A. Oveta Fuller, associate
professor of microbiology and
immunology and associate direc-
tor of the African Studies Center,
delivered an introduction that
touched on the nature of the
virus, its usual symptoms and
the need for better nutrition and
health care infrastructure, not
only in the countries affected by

the Ebolavirus outbreak, but also
in countries worldwide.
"This Ebola outbreak is notthe
only time that we have to work
together to coordinate health
care and that we can't wait to
work until there are epidemics
or crises like these," she said.
"We have to work in times when
there are not, to have students
prepared, people trained across
disciplines and infrastructure
prepared."
The panelists, who also
included Gesslar Murray, a geol-
ogy instructor at the University
of Liberia and Renee Gerring, a
laboratory supervisor also at the
University of Liberia, discussed
the daily effects of the outbreak
in Monrovia.
"Ebola consumes your body,"
Gerring said. "It takes control
over your life, your movements.
People are constantly in fear.
People become threats."
Gerring said people in affected
areas experience daily anxieties
from the threats posed by simple
interactions such as handshakes
and hugs. An abnormal life
See EBOLA, Page 6A

ABIGAIL KIRN/Daily
LSA senior Austin McCoy offers a historical context of the shooting and protests in Ferguson, Mo. McCoy helped
in leading the "Discussion on Ferguson" in Tisch Hall Wednesday.
GOVERNMENT
Snyder's'uitionrestraint'
contains cost of attendance

TerriLynn
Land focuses
campaign on
family issues
Against Peters,
Republican candidate
highlights payequality
By AMRUTHA SIVAKUMAR
Daily Staff Reporter
As the 2014 U.S. Senate elec-
tions come around the corner,
Republican candidate Terri Lynn
Land will challenge U.S. Rep.
Gary Peters (D) in the race for
the retiring Democratic Sen. Carl
Levin's seat.
Originally from Grand Rap-
ids, Land was elected as Kent
County Clerk in 1992. Though
she did not win her election for
Michigan State Board of Educa-
tion in 2000, Land was elected as
Michigan's 41st Secretary of State
in 2002 and served in the position
for two consecutive terms - the
maximum allowed in Michigan.
During her tenure, Land was rec-
ognized for optimizing queuing
times at election polling locations
and improving online service
options.
See LAND, Page 6A

Initiative incentivizes in 2011, he also reintroduced
a mechanism to incentivize
state universities to state universities to limit the
size of their annual tuition
slow fee increases increases. This effective cap
on tuition hikes, known as
By BEN ATLAS "tuition restraint," makes the
Daily StaffReporter state's provision of perfor-
mance funding conditional
When Republican Gov. Rick upon a university certifying it
Snyder cut the state's higher will not raise its tuition above
education budget by 15 percent a certain threshold.

The state capped tuition
increases at 3.75 percent for
the current school year in last
year's state budget, and the
current budget will lower the
cap to 3.2 percent for tuition
next year. This stricter thresh-
old, however, is being met with
a 6.1-percent increase in state
appropriations, marking the
third straight year of budget
See TUITION, Page 6A

WEATHER HI:60
TOMORROW LO:40

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INDEX
Vol, CXXV, No.16
02014 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily~com

NEW S ... .................2A SPORTS ..................7A
SUDOKU .................. 2A CLASSIFIEDS ............... 6A
OPINION ...................4A B-SIDE.................... 1B

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