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October 09, 2014 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-10-09

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2B - Thursday, October 9, 2014

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2B - Thursday, October 9, 2014 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

Protesting
Chanel's faux
femin ism

hanel's show for
the spring/sum-
mer 2015 collection
was impressive, with the set
itself disguised as a Parisian
street -
"Boulevard
Chanel" to
be exact.
Full with
life-size.
fagades and
worn-in
sidewalks,
the back- ERIKA
drop cre- HARWOOD
ated a true
trompe
l'oeil within Paris's Grand
Palais.'
The show took place as
normal, or as normal as a
runway show set in a artifi-
cial indoor neighborhood can
be. The models walked down
the narrow, cement-laden
faux street, wearing clas-
sic and crisp tweed, toting
shoulder bags and briefcases
designed for the Chanel-
wearing working girl. The
colors vibrant, the prints
bold and the models very
very famous (hi, Gisele, Cara
and Kendall). It was a beauti-
ful display ... until it tried to
make a statement.
The finale, led by the
almighty Karl Lagerfeld,was
staged as a pseudo-protest.
A procession of the beauti-
ful clad in Chanel pantsuits
holding signs with attempts
at politicized statements,
like "Boys should get preg-
nant too," "Feministe mais
Feminine" and "Tweed is
better tlan. Tweet" as models
hel; negaphones aniWhit-,
ney Houston's "I'm Every
Woman" blared through the
loudspeakers.
I didn't really think much
of it at first. Feminism in
popular culture is on the
rise and the fact that fashion
was getting in on the action
didn't strike me as odd. If
anything, it was exciting. A
gender-inclusive industry
full of hardworking, inspir-

ing, s
finall
equal
to th
ly). O
until
the e
starte
way.
Lo(
wheli
crafti
swar
raphe
types
unint
"Twe
Twee
yours
might
your
durin
doesn
Most
share
of str
word
to cre
in rea
more
in the
ism. C
hasht
Thi
frustr
as pic
music
probl
focus
and it
ing to
we
a
on
It's
afraid
ruffli
fashio

uccessful women was coherent, bold, valuable state-
ly joining the fight for ment - it could have. What
ity and taking the issue we're left with is half-assed
e streets (kind of literal- commentary and an embar-
r so I thought. It wasn't rassing take on a real issue.
I really, really looked at The collection was intend-
nd of the show that it all ed to be accessible - wear-
ed to rub me the wrong able clothes for all kinds of
women, with Lagerfeld even
oking past the over- telling journalists backstage,
ming set, the perfectly "They're all pieces everyone
ed jackets and the can play with. No '60s, no
ms of models, photog- '70s, no whatever, more mode
rs and Anna Wintour de vie than mode," which is
, the finale became true to a degree. The collec-
entionally funny. tion was a bold and vibrant
ed is better than interpretation of the every-
t" reads like a sentence day. Think 2014 remake of
fashion-savvy grandma "Working Girl" with lots of
t say to you if you had tweed and splatters of high-
phone out for too long lighter colors - wearable,
g Thanksgiving. It confident pieces.
't really make sense. Fashion's platform is a
of the "protest" signs high one, one that could at
d a similar appearance the least raise awareness,
ung-together buzz- even on a simple level, like
s contrived and sewn what Chanel was (maybe?)
ate a "message" when attempting to do - (Women
lity, it created nothing can wear whatever they want!
than another footnote Women can be feminists and
book on hashtag activ- give a shit about what they
)r, to be more specific, put on their bodies!). And
ag feminism. with someone in charge who
is apathetic approach claims to be close to the
-ates me the same way cause ("My mother was a
king apart someone's feminist, and I was brought
al taste and calling it up with a history of that,"
ematic would - it's not Lagerfeld explained), you
ing on the issue at hand expect ... better. Or, just dif-
sure as hell isn't help- ferent.
> solve the problem. Sure, the show garnered
attention. Yes, the collec-
tion looked great. And maybe
''re left with when you get down to it, it
was just supposed to be a
half-assed lighthearted celebration of
chicks wearing cool clothes.
mnmentary But it reduced a worthwhile
causeto. ,fleetjpg trend,
a real issue. which doesn't just make femi-
nism and fashion look like a
joke, but it makes those of
us who root for both look
not that Lagerfeld isn't like we're bad at picking
I of stirring the pot or our interests. Maybe that
ng feathers - no one in explains my love for Bruce
tn is, really. This is an Jenner's man bun.

baked.buzzed.bored.
in this series, three daily arts writers in
varying states of mind visit the same
place and write about their experiences.
this week's destination:
Bob's Burgers
OK here we go. This is the beginning. This is going so fast, and every-
one is creepier looking than I remember. I also just mixed C the worst
possible drink in history and I have no snacks downstairs and I'm too
lazy to go upstairs. The irreverent, fast paced comedy still maintains
humor even though a lot of the tropes are overused. So from what I've
gathered, the plot of this episode revolves around Tina and Gene being
in competing middle school musicals, both based on somewhat iconic
'80s movies, "Working Girl" and "Die Hard." There's scheming by Lou-
ise of course, because Louise is always schemey. There are some serious
problems with this episode though. There was barely any Bob or Linda
or TINA for crying out loud, how can you forget the best character of
this show?? There's also a little too much singing in this episode for my
taste, literally every other scene is completely singing?? Boooooo. But
there's a nice moral to the story! Sentimental shit hits hard, even if it is
"Bob's Burgers." I also just forgot how to type a comma.
- DAILY ARTS WRITER

SA nice dance number by a guy who looks like a girl ... It's fine. Why is
this kid singing? Like what is the purpose of this? Working Girl the musi-
cal looks promising I guess. Is time even passing? "Bob's Burgers" is like
a continuous stream of conscious thought... Some Confucius shit. "Wait-
ing is gross" HAHA THAT'S SUCH A GOOD LINE I'M GONNA FINNA
USE THAT FOREVER. What's the blonde chicks name she's so bitchy
it's awesome. They should change the name of the show this literally has
nothing to do with burgers. This is now taking a turn into a NEGATIVE
review. This show kind of is the opposite of good. "It's the boiler room,
it's boiling" wow these characters aren't very bright SMH. Honestly, do
I even have the credentials to judge bobs burgers? I don't even know bob
and I rarely eat red meat. Gene's character development is happening
way too fast OK how is he already the lead role in the musical when I
just met him five minutes ago? He should slow his roll for real and maybe
buy me dinner first before this escalates too quickly. There's too many
musicals to keep track of in this episode honestly the director should've
been more accommodating to me and my limited attention span. Oh shit
everything justgot so sentimental like the music and everything. I might
even feel feelings/emotions!!!! Haha AHAHAHAH just kidding I didn't
because this is "Bob's Burgers." Ooooh OK the sentimental shit was
because they're combining WORKING GIRL AAAAAND DIE HARD
into a musical called WORKING HARD!!!! Cool!!!!.
- DAILY ARTS WRITER

I do like Bob's Burgers, I really do. I think it's funny and creative; and
this, eans a lot coming from a person who really doesn't like adult car-
toons, at all. I truly didn't even know that this show was in it's fifth sea-
son already though, and learning that before watching made me a little
more ctitical since it's easy for shows to lose a lot of the original endear-
ing hutmor after a few years, the kind that Bob's Burgers isiknown for. So
the episode has a musical theme, which sets me off a little bit initially
because I'm not always down with the musical themed episode thing that
some shows tend to resort to. But this is all right! Along with the gagging
going along with a terrible mixed drink and some "what the hells," there
was a good amount of laughing on my end as well as my variously intoxi-
cated co-writers. You got shenanigans from Louise, butt-related com-
ments from Tina and the Belcher family ganging up on that weird school
psychologist. In the end, it was a funny episode and I give the creators
credit for doing a musical-themed episode.
- KATHLEEN DAVIS

industry that dwells on con-
troversy and thrives on spec-
tacle. If Chanel really wanted
to make a statement - a

Erika is trying'to avoid
mentioning the Kardashians. To
help, e-mail erikacat@umich.edu.

SINGLE REVIEW

FOLLOW US
FOR MORE
COLLEGIATE
BUFFOONERY.
@MICHIGANDAILY

David Guetta's "Dangerous,"
the firstsingle from the 46-year-
old's upcoming sixth studio
albumLis-
ten, hints at
a relatively
new direc- Dangerous
tion for the
DJ. Featur- Dan d Gueista
ing Sam Warner
Martin, who
also pro-
vided vocals for Guetta's "Lovers
On The Sun," "Dangerous" feels
both current and futuristic at
the same time, combining retro
synth, orchestral instruments
and heavy electro beats.
After an ominously twinkling
piano intro, the build-up of
instruments and sounds is dif-
ficultto keep trackof but some-
how all comestogetherto form a

A

unique backing for Martin's epic
vocals. It's hard not to think that
Guetta took a page from Daft
Punk's book here - the throw-
back funk-inspired beat (espe-
cially leading up tocthe bridge)
shares a clear similarity with
some tracks off of their success-
fulRandomAccessMemories -
but he's given it a grittier vibe.

WARNER
Let's think of "Dangerous"
as the edgier, bad-ass, younger
brother of "Get Lucky." Though
maybe a bit too off-beat to be a
Top 40 homerun, "Dangerous"
is a creative triumph for Guetta
and hintsthat his music feels
fresh for the firsttime since he
released "Titanium."
-GIBSON JOHNS

A

ARE YOU
LOOKING FOR
AN OUTLET
FOR YOUR
POP CULTURE
OPINIONS?
GET YOUR
WORDS
PUBLISHED
ONLINE BY
JOINING
THE FILTER,
THE MICHIGAN
DAILY ARTS
BLOG.
E-mail
adepollo@umich.edu to
request an application.

EPISODE REVIEW

Even in its trailer, "The
Affair" setsup whatcouldbe
one of the most atmospheric
series on
television.
Through its
distorted The Affair
lens and pale
color scheme, Sundaysoat10pf
Showtime's Showtime
newest
drama series
promises to be as aesthetically
lustful as its titular romance.
Starring a quartet of actors
from some of television's most
revered works ("The Wire,"
"ER," "Fringe" and "Luther"),
"The Affair" tells the story of
two married couples - one
vacationing, one residing - in
Montauk, Long Island and the
extramarital relationship that

brings themtogether. But the
trailer promises even more;
throughout the two-minute
series preview, a detective
questions the lead characters
regarding the history of their
relationship.
The implications of this
investigation remain a mys-
tery and serve to elevate "The

I
SHOWTIME
Affair" from merely arelation-
ship-centric drama to a tragic
exploration of doomed lovers.
Don't let the unimaginativeness
of the title deter you - "The
Affair" has all the makings of
an intriguing, mature series
worthy of its premiumcable
home.
-ALEC STERN

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