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September 09, 2014 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-09-09

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Tuesday, September 9, 2014 - 3

The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom Tuesday, September 9, 2014 - 3

NEWS BRIEFS
DETROIT
GM to offer car
that will almost
drive itself
Cars that can talk to each other
and almost drive themselves at
freeway speeds are just two years
away from the showroom, accord-
ingto General Motors executives.
The company announced Sun-
day that the semi-autonomous sys-
tem for freeways will be an option
on an unidentified new 2017 Cadil-
lac that goes on sale in the summer
of 2016. In addition, another 2017
Cadillac, the CTS, will be equipped
with radio transmitters and receiv-
ers that will let it communicate
with other cars, sharing data such
as location, speed and whether the
driver is applying the brakes.
YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif.
Weather slows
Yosemite wildfire
that dozens fled
Cooler weather on Monday
slowed the spread of a wildfire
that forced the helicopter evacua-
tion of dozens of people from the
famous Half Dome rockinYosem-
ite National Park.
"We were pleasantly surprised
ywith high humidity and scattered
showers throughout the morn-
ing,"said Kari Cobb, a park ranger.
"So anytimeyouhaveweather like
that it's going to help suppress fire
activity."
The fire, which had burned
about 4 square miles of timber-
land, wasn't threatening any
buildings. The park remained
open, but some campsites were
closed.
About 120 firefighters and 11
aircraft fought the blaze, which
may have erupted from embers of
a fire sparked by lightning several
weeks ago, officials said.
SAN FRANCISCO
Federal court hears
arguments over gay,
marriage's impact
A federal appeals court in San
Francisco waded again into the
debate over the constitutionality
of gay marriage, with attorneys for
both sides arguing over whether
legalizing it would harm children.
The three judges on the 9th
Circuit Court of Appeals - two
of whom have ruled in previ-
ous cases in favor of gay rights
- reserved many of their most
pointed questions at the defend-
ers of state bans in Idaho, Nevada
and Hawaii.
Judge Marsha Berzon
appeared critical of the attorney
defending two of the bans, say-
ing he was sending a message
that families headed by same-sex
couples were "second-rate."

MONROVIA, Liberia
WHO says Liberia
will see thousands
of new Ebola cases
The United States and Brit-
ain will send medical equipment
and military personnel to help
contain West Africa's Ebola out-
break, as the World Health Orga-
nization warned Monday that
many thousands of new infec-
tions are expected in Liberia in
the coming weeks.
The current Ebola outbreak
is the largest on record. It has
spread from Guinea to Sierra
Leone, Liberia, Nigeria and
Senegal and killed more than
2,000 people. An "exponential
increase" in new cases is expect-
ed in the hardest-hit countries in
coming weeks, the U.N. health
agency warned.
"As soon as a new Ebola treat-
ment facility is opened, it imme-
diately fills to overflowing with
patients, pointing to a large but
previously invisible caseload,"
WHO said in a statement about
the situation in Liberia. "Many
thousands of new cases are
expected in Liberia over the com-
ing three weeks."
-Compiled from
Daily wire reports

The new Fireside Cafe in Pierpont Commons on North Campus celebrated its opening on Monday.

FIRESIDE
From Page 1
"Certainly what you see
today is a result of some of those
comments that we received
from this specific community,"
Swanigan said.
He added that he is happy
with the finished product of
the cafe and with the feed-
back he has received from
students.
"I am absolutely thrilled with
SCHOOLBOY
From Page 1
ognizable names. Nowadays,
Hill more frequently hosts to
classical music and folk con-
certs, with appearances from
national stars now becoming
fewer and further between.
"We think that there's been
a huge gap in the entertain-
ment department at the Uni-
FACULTY
From Page 1
Holland said deansof each
individual college have juris-
diction over a vast number of
departments; for example, an
LSA dean manages language,
science and literature all at
once.
Schlissel said he plans to sit in
on the deans' meetings as a "fly
on the wall" to learn more about
the bureaucracy within each
individual school and to see if
there are any areas in need of
improvement.
Another contested topic was
transparency of administrative
salaries. Last spring, a large
ECONOMY
From Page 1
received - but to a limited
extent, and with varying impact
depending on location.
The findings come from
data collected in the fall 2013
edition of the Michigan Pub-
lic Policy Survey, a biannu-
ally administered study that
asks local government officials
across the state about a variety
of topics.
According to the survey,
99 percent of local leaders -
which the study classified as a
mix of city managers, mayors,
township officials and county
administrators and board chairs
- agree that the Great Lakes
overall are an important eco-
nomic resource for Michigan.
Regarding the lakes' status as
a local economic resource, this
sentiment was most strongly
rooted in coastal jurisdictions,
with 71 percent of leaders say-
ing they felt strongly that the
KICK-OFF
From Page 1
tournament.
Beilein offered his "WIN"

acronym - what's important
now - asa tool for keeping objec-
tives in line. As an example, he
said in identifying what his play-
ers need to work on in any given
practice, he may not have a solid
idea going into it. However, once
he pinpoints problems and how
to solve them, he doesn't let any-
thing else get in the way.

how it turned out," he said. "I
am glad that we have this for the
community and that it's getting
such positive feedback."
Swanigan also said he appre-
ciates that the cafe offers longer
hours and a more visible dining
area so students are more aware
of all that North Campus has to
offer.
Isaiah Bailey, vice chair of
the Pierpont Commons Board
of Representatives, echoed
Swanigan's sentiments, saying
he is proud of the collaborative
versity, in terms of getting
the students involved and
bringing shows that would
unite the University and get
the students excited," said
LSA senior, Bo Bradarich,
co-president of Big Ticket.
"We've really been trying to
find our place there and get
quality artists that students
actually could get excited
about."
ScHoolboy Q should defi-
group of faculty signed a letter
denouncing what they saw as
high administrative salaries and
called for bonus information to
be made readily available to the
public.
Holland said since admin-
istrative salaries are funded
with public money, information
about bonuses should be public
as well.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Prof. David Smith, another
SACUA member, said he doesn't
see a reason to keep administra-
tive bonuses private.
"They earn it; they deserve it
fine," he said. "But I haven't
heard a good argument that
says why they shouldn't (make
bonuses public)."
lakes are an important eco-
nomic resource for their local
community. However, this num-
ber dropped sharply 10 miles
inland, with only 21 percent of
local leaders feeling strongly
that the lakes are an impor-
tant economic resource locally.
Among local leaders more than
40 miles inland, the 58 percent
of local officials disagree that
there are valuable local econom-
ic benefits from the Lakes to be
had on a local level.
Tom Ivacko, CLOSUP's pro-
gram manager and admin-
istrator, said the differing
assessments of the lakes' impor-
tance by location, especially
with such wide variation, was
surprising.
"We expected to see much
stronger connections between
local governments and the Great
Lakes," Ivacko said. "When you
think about Michigan, you think
about the Great Lakes. They're
such an important part of our
history, our self-identity, that to
see this relationship weaken so
Beilein also explained how to
maintain drive in light ofachieve-
ment. One point that was touched
on several times throughout the
panel was that it is much easier to

know how to improve when one
has not met a goal.
"It's a good feeling to have suc-
cess when you know you've got-
ten it the right way," he said.
Robert Sellers, professor of
education and psychology and
vice provost for equity, inclu-
sion and academic affairs, took
the idea of learning and growing
through failure a step further
A

efforts that went into the space's
design and renovation.
"I think most importantly
we had a group that was will-
ing to work together through
any challenges," Bailey said. "In
a few meetings, we even got to
meet with the designers. It was
a smooth process. It definitely
could have been a lot tougher
than it was."
Bailey also emphasized how
involved students were in the
project, and encouraged stu-
dents to stay involved in the
nitely bring the excitement.
After making his first impres-
sions in the hip-hop world with
the A$AP-Rocky-featuring
single "Hands on the Wheel,"
Q found himself somewhat
overshadowed by his label-
mate and Black Hippy cohort
Kendrick Lamar and his crit-
ically-acclaimed smash, good
kid, m.A.A.d city. However,
ScHoolboy returned with Feb-
ruary's Oxymoron and its run
Not posting total salaries,
Smith argued, could "give the
appearance of something to
hide. If you're going t put it out,
then put out the truth."
Schlissel said Smith's logic
was sound, but added that some
of the money that composes sal-
aries cannot be made not public,
such as that of the University's
clinical faculty, who may be
paid for the medical services
they offer. He said the Univer-
sity is in competition with other
health care providers and it is
important for the institution to
retain its clinical staff.
The conversation regard-
ing salaries ultimately segued
into a larger talk about making
the University a place where
quickly in such a short distance,
we were pretty surprised by
that."
When asked who should be
responsible for protecting the
Great Lakes, local leaders listed
state government first, followed
by the U.S and Canadian federal
governments, the private sector,
individuals, and then local gov-
ernment last.
Ivacko said while this finding
was surprising, it was tempered
by several other factors, namely
the fact that even though local
government is listed last, 67 per-
cent of respondents still said it
should have some responsibility.
"That's still a pretty strong
majority; it's just much lower
than state governments or
the U.S and Canadian fed-
eral governments and so on,"
he said. "But still, more than
two-thirds think their own
local governments should have
some role."
Survey respondents also
answered questions about pro-
posed regulatory actions to
with a personal anecdote of the
proudest grade he ever received.
It was an F in seventh-grade Eng-
lish.
"Over four semesters, I finally

got it up to a B, and I worked my
butt off." he said. "All the other
As paled in comparison, because
it was the F that made me actu-
ally work."
Since the students in the audi-
ence have begun their second
week of classes, Deloria offered
advice on how to stay focused
and keep up with their work. He
called on students to use office

future.
"It's interesting to me that
somebody can come with a
vision and put something like
this together from what was
already here," Bailey said. "To
have been in the Commons Cafe
before and see what it is now
shows what amazing work can
be done when you get people
collaborating together and you
have top notch designers who
are here and putting together
something students can really
enjoy."
of hit singles, reestablishing
himself in the top tier of young
hip-hop artists.
Extensive touring behind
Oxymoron saw Q play Detroit
and Grand Rapids in April,
and his summer festival dates
included a slot at Electric For-
est in Rothbury, MI.
Tickets for the show go on
sale at 12 PM on Friday, Sept.
12, with supporting acts to be
announced soon.
everyone - faculty, administra-
tion and students alike - can do
their best work.
Schlissel asked SACUA mem-
bers to consider "w'liat t is about
our existing environment that
contributes to your ability to
be a great scholar ... and what's
missing."
This request aligned with
Schlissel's greater goal of mak-
ing Michigan as good a school
as any for the highest academic
pursuits. Part of this endeavor,
he said, will require the Univer-
sity to further enrich its intel-
lectual environment.
"I'm thrilled that Mary Sue
(Coleman) did a lot of physical
building," Schlissel said. "Now
maybe, we should be investing
promote the restoration of the
Great Lakes, several of which
would result in direct or indi-
rect costs to local communities.
Here, the result was more
positive, with the majority of
local leaders supporting 10 of
the proposed policy actions.
Ivacko said the reportdemon-
strated that overall, many local
leaders understand the benefits
of a "blue economy for the entire
state," but not necessarily for
their own communities.
"For any stakeholders who
are trying to establish more of a
blue economy within the state,
I think these survey results are
not necessarily a wakeup call,
but they highlight that there's
a lot of work to do," he said. "If
other folks that are pushing for
these kinds of economic ties had
the same assumptions that we
did going into this, I think this
may raise some eyebrows about
how much work they may have
to do to strengthen those bonds
between local governments who
are not on the coast."
hours to develop relationships
with professors, which he cited
as "all the usual stuff that stu-
dents don't do."
He said that the best thing stu-

dents can do right now is to mark
important dates from syllabi, and
factor in how much time and
preparation should go into each
deadline.
The LSA Theme Semester will
host a series of events throughout
the rest of the semester, which
include film viewings, panel
discussions and lectures, all of
which are opento students.

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