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January 23, 2014 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-01-23

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, January 23,2014

michigandaily.com

THE SWING OF THINGS BUSINESS
Restaurant
Weekmakes
long-term
customers

Instructors Lauren Janicki and Chris Glasow swing dance with Swing Ann Arbor at the Michigan League on Wednesday.
ADMINISTRATION
Board talks future of 'U'

Despite the low prices,
business managers say
exposure brings in a
new clientele
By CHRISTY SONG
Daily StaffReporter
On a typical day, Asian sea bass at
Main Street's Mdlange costs a cool
$29. The Restaurant Week special,
though, was $28 and included three
courses.
It's natural to assume that such low
prices would discourage restaurants
to participate in Restaurant Week,
and Laura Wanke, general manager
and owner of Melange, confirmed
she experienced a slight dip in prof-
its. However, she said the huge wave
of customers makes Restaurant Week
an advantageous marketing tool for
attracting a new clientele.
"We're going to take the increased
volume for that one week definitely
over the reduced profitability,"Wanke
said.

The weeks following the holiday
season in January are often tough for
restaurants; customers' wallets and
waistlines have to recover from pres-
ent shopping and Christmas cookie-
munching.
Gratzi manager Luke Magnini said
Restaurant Week gives the establish-
ment a boost it typically doesn't expe-
rience this time of year. He added that
restaurants rarely see many custom-
ers in early January, as most restau-
rant-goers are recovering from the
holidays.
"It's not that much of a difference
as far as revenue wise per person, but
it's a great boost to get people in as in
otherwise would normally be a slow
week for us," he said.
Other restaurants affirmed that the
publicity and low-prices of Restaurant
Week pleases both regular and first-
time guests. Magnini said Restaurant
Week goers often become long-term
guests.
"We find a lot of guests that have
become regulars and this is kind of
their week to explore and to see a lot
of the new restaurants, but also to
See RESTAURANTS, Page 3A

Regents discuss
digital education,
health system
By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily NewsEditor
For centuries, scores of
immigrants, writers, art-
ists and entrepreneurs have

journeyed to New York City
in search of opportunity or
inspiration.
Hoping to draw their own
insights from a selection of the
East Coast's premier academic
institutions, the University's
Board of Regents gathered in
New York City late last week
to discuss a range of topics,
including the future of aca-
demic health centers and digi-

tal education.
The sessions, which were
closed to the public, were
held in place of the board's
regularly scheduled monthly
meeting. This is the second
time this board has opted for
an out-of-state, January trip.
Last year, the regents flew
to Los Angeles to meet with
leaders from Google, Stanford
University and University of

California-Berkeley.
In an interview with The
Michigan Daily before the
trip, University President
Mary Sue Coleman said the
excursion provides a time for
the regents to get out of their
normal environment and
think broadly about issues fac-
inginstitutions of higher edu-
cation.
See BOARD, Page 3A

HOSPITAL
Students aim.
to provide ACA
info to public

SUIT UP

Washtenaw Health
Initiative recruits
garner sign-ups for
insurance plans
ByAMABEL KAROUB
DailyStaffReporter
As the end of open enroll-
ment for health insurance
under the Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act draws
near, University students are
reaching out to ensure that the
public is educated about their
options under the new law.
The Washtenaw Health Ini-
tiative has recruited nearly 70
University students who are
nowworking around the coun-
ty to educate low-income indi-
viduals about the ACA. Their
mission: encourage the unin-
sured to come to hospitals, like
University of Michigan Health
System, where employees are
on call to help people enroll.
HealthCare.gov -the nation-
al public exchange program for
health insurance providers -
has anongoing open enrollment

periodallowingnew customers
to register for health insurance
from last October until March
31 of this year.
While approximately 75,000
Michiganders have signed up
for coverage under the new
laws, there are thousands more
who desperately need health
insurance, and do not know
how ACA works and what kind
of benefits they can recieve.
WHI project manager Car-
rie Rheingans said students
are looking to educate those
who believe they cannot afford
health insurance under the new
act.
"The biggest hurdle that peo-
ple have is that they still think
it's going to be expensive,"
Rheingans said. "Historically,
insurance has been expensive,
that's why people didn't get it.
But they don't know about all of
the tax credits and other assis-
tance that is available until they
go on there and enter their own
personal information."
While misconceptions about
expense are one reason why
many low-income Americans
have not have signed up for
See LEGISLATION, Page 3A

VIRGINIALOZANO/Daily
Business junior Haolin Wang meets with a company at the Career Fair in the Union on Wednesday.
RESEARCH
Study examines ste-m cell
role in breast cancer care

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Resolutions
created in
CSG, Big
10 meeting
Delegates from
universities draft goals
for tuition equality
By MICHAEL SUGERMAN
DailyStaffReporter
For the first time in history, stu-
dent government delegations from all
Big Ten universities convened at the
biannual Association of Big Ten Stu-
dents Conference, hosted last week-
end by the University of Minnesota.
Members of the Central Student
Government's executive committee
comprised the University's delega-
tion, attending lectures, participat-
ing in forums and collectively passing
six resolutions pertaining to issues
the delegates found to be relevant on
campuses throughout the Big Ten.
Business senior Michael Proppe,
CSG president, said higher education
affordability was at the forefront of
talks between the delegates, which
ultimately was reinforced by the res-
olutions they passed.
"You see a lot in common," Proppe
said. "Across the board, you have cuts in
state fundingtohighereducation. Every-
See RESOLUTIONS, Page 3A

New findings
suggest they exist
in transition states
By KAITLIN ZURDOSKY
Daily StaffReporter
Researchers at the Univer-
sity's Comprehensive Cancer
Center, in collaboration with

an international cohort, have
developed means of identifying
two states of breast cancer stem
cells, giving them new clues as
to how to treat patients with
cancer.
By distinguishing the dif-
ferent states, they hope to find
more targeted and effective
treatments for the disease,
which kills over 40,000 people
each year in the U.S., according

to the American Cancer Soci-
ety.
"What we found is that the
stem cells actually are like cha-
meleons - that is they can exist
in two different states," said
Max S. Wicha, M.D., professor
of Oncology and director of the
University of Michigan Com-
prehensive Cancer Center.
In breast cancer, a small
See CANCER, Page 3A

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