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January 31, 2014 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-01-31

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2 - Friday, January 31, 2014

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2 - Friday, January 31, 2014 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

('the fidcipan Oail
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Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
PETER SHAHIN KIRBYVOIGTMAN
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1251 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
pjshahin@michigandaily.com kvoigtman@michigandaily.com

UPPER LEFT Michigan State
fans cheer during Michigan's
80 to 75 win over the Spar-
tans at the Breslin Center
Saturday (Paul Sherman/
Daily)
BOTTOM LEFT Master
Wasentha Young leads a
tai-chi workshop at the 2014
Asian American Health Fair
Saturday. (Lily Angell/Daily)
RIGHT Daily reporters and
photographers looked in
on sustainable cooking at
cooperatives. To the right is
a retrigerator at the Lester
Cooperative. (Nicholas Wil-
liams/Daily)

Newsroom
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CRIME NOTES CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Construction is Microwave on Get folky
well ... loud a rage WHAT: It's timea
the 7th nul At

again for
b nArn

WHERE: Wall Street
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 8 a.m.
WHAT: Loud sounds were
reported from a construc-
tion site. Ittturned out to
be regular construction
sounds, University Police
reported.

WHERE: Helen Newberry
Residence Hall
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 11 p.m.
WHAT: A student over-
heated food ina microwave,
causing the room's fire
alarm to sound, University
Police reported.

tme 3 tn annua Ann Aroor
Folk Festival. The night's
lineup is headlined by Iron
and Wine, Neko Case and
Justin Townes Earle. Tick-
ets start at $35.
WHO: Michigan Union
Ticket Office
WHEN: Today at 6:30 p.m.
WHERE: Hill Auditorium

Antifreeze spill Cold pipe probz ,e
Students
WHERE: Mott Children's
Hospital WHERE: East Quad Resi- photos of India
dseer dbss r lntr dat ll

Andalusian
guitar
WHAT: Matthew Ardiz-
zone will perform Andalu-
sian compositions related to
the legacy of Islamic pres-
ence in Spain.
WHO: School of Music,
Theatre & Dance
WHEN: Today at8 p.m.
WHERE: Museum of Art
CORRECTIONS
A pre"ious version ofche
JTan. 29 article "SAPAC
pilots chatfeature to
offer resources" mis-
spelled a company named
Olark as Alark. The com-
pany is an Ann Arbor
based organization.
" Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

A petition on the White
House's website aiming
to deport pop star Jus-
tin Bieber has garnered over
100,000 signatories., according
to Yahoo News. Its supporters
hope to seperate Bieber from
the U.S. after his various scan-
dals over the pastyear.
Despite being deter-
mined responsible
of an alleged sexual
assault by the Office of Insti-
tutional Equity, the Universi-
ty allowed Brendan Gibbons
to play in a football game.
a> FOR MORE, SEE OPINION, PAGE 4
The New York State
Department of Envi-
ronmental Conserva-
tion has dubbed mute swans
a "prohibited invasive spe-
cies," The New York Times
reported. The geese appar-
ently harm native ducks and
people.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Katie Burke Managing Editor kgburke@michigandaily.com
lenniferCalfas Managing News Editor jcalfas@michigandailycom
SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Ian Dillingham, Sam Gringlas, Will Greenberg, Rachel Premack
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es nARTS EDITORS: Giancarlo Buonomo, Natalie Gadbois, Erika Harwood and
ASISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Jamie Bircoll, Jackson Howard, Gillian Jakab and Maddie
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Paul Shenan) Ms agisgkhototEditor s photo@michigandaily.com
ASSISTANTPHOTOEDITORS:AllisonFarrand,TracyKo,TerraMolengraffandNicholas
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BUSINESS STAFF
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Olivia Jones Layout Manager
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free o charge to al readers Additiona copies may
be ikedupattheDailyofficefor52.Subscriptionserfalterm, startinginSeptembev nSmai :n110.
benpe te ganuath eAilis $1emrogThe te d Pressh aodghpAsri i Ol e gr iatess .
ae: sub:i e ut o e dsuobcio n e.5On-ampusosciptions for fal item are135. Subscriptions must
be ead.The Michian Daly is a member of Te Associaed 5Peos eed The AosoitudColegiaePress:

w H ENv: wenes ay at
about 7 p.m.
WHAT: Children head-
ing into Mott Children's
Hospital faced a half-gallon
spill of antifreeze. Cleanup
crews were requested, Uni-
versity Police reported.

aence Hai
WHEN: Wednesday at 9:30
a.m.
WHAT: Tuesday's cold
froze a pipe in a ground-
level classroom, causing it
to burst and resulting in
water in several classrooms,
University Police reported.

WHAT: A gallery of stu-
dent-submitted photos of
India exploring city, culture
and people will be on dis-
play to the public.
WHO: Matthaei Botanical
Garens & Nichols Arbore-
tum
WHEN: Today 10 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
WHERE: Matthaei Botani-
cal Gardens

MORE ONLINE LoveCrimeNotes?
Get more online at michigandaily.com/blogs/The Wire

. .,.

CSG faces budget decrease
for student organizations

Polish Studies program
recognized after 40 years

Lower enrollment
means less funding
for SOFC and others
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
Daily StaffReporter
A drop in enrollment and a
stagnant student fee has ham-
strung Central Student Govern-
ment's funding, which will likely
award $36,000 less to student
groups this semester than it did

last semester.
Business senior Eric Kibler,
CSG's treasurer, said $120,000
of CSG's preliminary budget has
been set aside for the Student
Organization Funding Commis-
sion, compared to $156,000 last
semester.
The $120,000 is only 41 percent
of CSG's $293,451 total budget for
this semester, which is generated
from a $7.19 per-semester fee
from each student and any roll-
over funds.
In a viewpoint published by

WHAT IS YORfavorite?
ICE CREAM LANDLORD BREAKFAST VOTE TODAY!
BEST OF ANN ARBOR 2014

The Michigan Daily in March,
Business senior Mike Proppe,
CSG president, and Public Policy
senior Bobby Dishell, CSG's vice
president promised at least half of
CSG's budget would go to SOFC.
Kibler said the 50 per-
cent benchmark wasn't pos-
sible because CSG lost roughly
$30,000 in student fee revenue
this semester. According to pre-
liminary figures given to CSG,
members said about 4,000 fewer
students enrolled for class this
semester than in the fall - pend-
ing any increase or decrease fol-
lowingthe add/drop deadline.
Kibler said when the budget
was drafted, funding SOFC was a
priority, but CSG's compiled code
has specific rules against cutting
money from some areas of stu-
dent government.
"We couldn't really cut any-
where else in the budget," Kibler
said.
Still, as the semester progress-
es, unused money from some seg-
ments of CSG could be moved to
SOFC's budget.
Some CSG leaders hope raise
the $7.19 student fee for CSG -
which hasn't been raised since
2005 - to alleviate budgetary
shortfalls.
Even in the winter 2013 semes-
ter, when SOFC had $185,000 to
award, student organizations
requested more than $700,000,
Kibler said.
While Kibler said not all
requests of SOFC are necessary,
he and Proppe have discussed
raising the fee with administra-
tors.
"I would like to see CSG have
a higher income," Kibler said.
"Personally, I would like to dou-
ble the fee."
Raising the student fee has
been an annual discussion
among student government lead-
ers.
Business junior Skylar Pur-
sell, the current SOFC chair, said
in an e-mail interview even if the
revenue were increased, it's not
clear that SOFC would get sub-
stantially more funds.

After long being
considered a fund,
program now
officially established
By CARLY FROMM
Daily StaffReporter
It's about time.
Forty years after its incep-
tion, the Copernicus Program
in Polish Studies received Uni-
versity recognition earlier this
month.
Though the program has
funded fellowships, guest lec-
tures, summer grants and
courses pertaining to Polish
studies for years, it was previ-
ously considered a fund rather
than an official University pro-
gram.
Marysia Ostafin, executive
director of the program, said
formal recognition serves as
a testament to everything the
program has accomplished over
the past four decades.
"Until this formal recogni-
tion by the College of LSA, we
were just an informal endow-
ment that funded projects,"
Ostafin said. "It is a recogni-
tion of the work that we've
done over these years and also
a recognition of our fundrais-
ing. We've really established
ourselves."
The program, which receives
a large portion of its funds
from the Nicolaus Copernicus
Endowment, "is now widely
regarded as the premier Pol-
ish Studies program in North
America," according to a Uni-
versity press release.
"Everybody is delighted,"
Ostafin said. "We've achieved
something new and great."
She added that this recog-
nition will also aid in the pro-
gram's fundraising efforts.
"I think it'll help us in fun-
draising along the way, too,
because people will recognize
that this is a real, established
and recognized program in Pol-

ish studies," Ostafin said.
Alena Aniskiewicz, a gradu-
ate student in the Department
of Slavic Languages & Litera-
tures, said the program sets the
University apart from its com-
petitors.
"Thanks to the Copernicus
Endowment, Michigan is one
of the best places anywhere to
study Polish topics," Aniskie-
wicz said. "Its formal recogni-
tion as a program underscores
both its value to the Univer-
sity and a commitment to the
continued promotion of Polish
studies in Ann Arbor."
The Copernicus Program
has also been a draw for pro-
spective students.
Jodi Greig, a graduate stu-
dent in the Department of Slav-
ic Languages & Literatures,
decided to come to the Univer-
sity in large part due to the pro-
gram's offerings.
"One of the reasons I chose
my Ph.D. program at Michi-
gan is precisely the widespread
support for Polish studies,"
Greig said. "The Endowment
basically allowed me to com-
plete research every summer
for the first three years of grad-
uate school. It would have been
impossible to do summer Polish
language courses and research
without it."
Additionally, with the Coper-
nicus Endowment Fellowship,
students have had the opportu-
nity to study abroad.
Paulina Duda, another gradu-
ate student in the Department
of Slavic Languages & Lit-
eratures, said the Copernicus
Endowment provided her with
the opportunity to study in
Ukraine.
Duda left her home in Poland
to study at the University. Dur-
ing summer term, she said she
had planned to work in a coffee
shop before she discovered the
abroad opportunity.
"It's has been enriching the
student life immeasurably with
opportunities to travel to that
part of the world, to study the
language."

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