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February 07, 2014 - Image 6

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6 - Friday, February 7, 2014

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

6 - Friday, February 7, 2014 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

NOODLE
From Page 1
unsure if many students would go
to Slurping Turtle if it is higher
priced than competitors.
"Honestly, I don't really know
because I have to see what the
Slurping Turtle is like so it
depends but I guess there might
be some competition if there are
two ramen shops," Chang said.

LSA senior Jenny Kim said
she was unsure about the new
restaurant's future success, cit-
ing higher prices as a factor that
might make it more difficult for
the restaurant to become estab-
lished in the Asian fusion mar-
ket.
"Seating and waiting is a big
thing so maybe if it's a little
more spacious then people will
want to go there," Kim said. "I
think that everyone wants to try

new things soI think it would be
good."
Other students think the loca-
tion of Slurping Turtle might
also be problematic for its long-
term prospects.
LSA senior Lauren Himmel
said she thinks the fate of Slurp-
ing Turtle could be similar to
that of Firehouse Subs, which
was located close to many simi-
lar restaurants. Firehouse Subs
closed earlier this year after 10

months in business.
"I think that it would do bet-
ter if it were to be located on
South (University) and so stu-
dents who are looking for the
same kind of feel or want the
same kind of type of food would
be able to access it from that
kind of area instead of having
to walk all the way across cam-
pus," she said.

LUNAFEST All of the money raised by us to raise money for this cause," Omega community service fra-
From Page 1 the event will go towards char- said Medical School student ternity helped distribute event
ity. Most of the proceeds will help Joshua Stoolman, a Take Back the brochures and LUNA bars to
University Students Against Rape Night participant. "LUNA bar is attendees. The Women's Law
making them out to be sex sym- organize the Take Back the Night a big name so to have somebody School Association and Central
bols or damsels in distress," said Ann Arbor Rally and March, with who sponsors a film festival like Student Government also co-
Law student Samantha Honea, remaining earnings supporting that and help this organization is sponsored the event.
co-leader of University Students the Breast Cancer Fund. really a great thing."
Against Rape. "Ithinkit'sareallygreatwayfor Students from the Alpha Phi
BRIARWOOD of get lost," she said. less Shoes and Icing, a jewelry of a year-round ice skating rink.
BrmaWeODai said Briarwood labeled store targeting pre-teen shop- When the remodel concluded
From Page 1 the old storefronts with list- pers. Windsor is the only store late last year, there were 40
ings of new locations to prevent that will not be open during its days of activities and giveaways
"Our mall has undergone confusion and hopes the mall's transition to a new location in leading up to the holidays.
amazing changes and trans- maps will be updated. the mall. It is currently closed Kohtz said the renovation
formations over the past year," In addition to the Forever 21 and is expected to reopen on helped generate interest in the
Murray said. "We are excited to expansion, Destination Mater- May 1. mall and the addition of the ice
continue to grow, expand and nity will relocate next to the Kohtz said that plans for rink has been especially great
offer our shoppers the very best Von Maur department store, the transition have been in the for families and hosting events,
in retail." and shoe store Journeys will works for a few years. like performances by The
LSA senior Yilu Dai said she take over the old Destination "The mall will have a sub- G-Men, University a capella
would be interested in shop- Maternity store. A Journeys stantial new look and feel, group, during the holidays.
ping at a larger Forever 21, but Kids store is scheduled to open which is something we are Briarwood also has plans
that she has had trouble finding in the old Journey's space in always working to achieve," she to add two more restaurants
stores at Briarwood when they May. said. outside Macy's. The plan was
have relocated in the past. Finally, Windsor, which spe- Last year's renovation approved by the city last month,
"I shop at Forever 21 a lot so cializes in dresses, is moving involved bringing in new but Kohtz said they are not yet
I probably will go if it's bigger, next to Wet Seal, and its old retailers including Athleta and ready to announce which res-
but sometimes I feel like I kind location will be filled by Pay- Michael Kors and the addition taurants will be moving in.
ARE YOU ONE FOR THE SCENT OF INK AND PRINT? OR DO YOU LIVE FOR NEWS ONLINE?
DO YOU LIKE MULTIMEDIA REPORTING? OR TRYING TO KEEP THE REGENTS IN LINE?
THEN JOIN THE MICHIGAN DAILY
IT SOUNDS LIKE YOUR KIND OF PLACE!

TROTTER
From Page 1
ideas, room that could be rented
out and create economic power
in the community was suggested.
A kitchen, a resource center with
computers, printers and a place
to study, creative places to paint
or write, safe, private spaces to
talk and places for guests, speak-
ers or other students, were all
brought up as well.
The Trotter House was
renamed the Trotter Multicul-
tural Center in 1981 to be more
inclusive to students from many
backgrounds, instead of only
being a space for Black students.
It later merged with MESA (a
student organization focused on
diversity and social justice) to
serve an even broader campus
audience.
"Moving from a Trotter House
to a Trotter Multicultural Cen-
ter is quite the slap in the face,"
said LSA junior Rolly Abiola, a
student manager at the Trotter
Center and discussion leader at
Thursday night's meeting.
From 1998 to 2004, Abiola
said, the building underwent a
facility enhancement assessment
to see if the building met fire
codes, which it did not. Accord-
ing to Abiola, the building was
structurally unsafe and nothing
was acted upon or even submit-
ted to the University until 2005,
Abiola said.
Only small changes - a new
paint job and a new pillar on the
third floor - were made, Abiola
said.
"I've come here, I've napped
here, I've cried here,"Abiola said.
"I've been frustrated here. I've
been fed here. This is my house.
This is my room. This place has
nurtured me when I didn't think
I deserved to be nurtured."
It took 10 years for changes
to be made to make the building
wheelchair accessible. Today,
only the basement and the first
floor are accessible. According
to Abiola, all other floors are still
inaccessible to the physically
impaired.
"We made it work and we are
still making it work, to be quite

frank, because this building is
still not where it needs to be,"
Abiola said.
Abiola said the University has
neglected the Trotter Center
numerous times in the past. She
cited an incident on Aug. 25th,
2013 when an intoxicated stu-
dent from one of the numerous
fraternity houses located next
to the Trotter Center illegally
entered the center, dragging
blood coming from a wound on
his ankle across the entirety of
the first and second floor.
Abiola said the police declared
the incident an "open and shut
case" once they located the stu-
dent and left. They did not make
sure anyone else was in the
building or if the students were
safe Abiola said.
After the incident, students
and the resident staff had to
scrub the blood off the ground,
she said.
"There was a lack of response
from the University and even
weeks after the incident there
were no crime alerts sent out,"
Abiola said. "We are so disre-
spected on so many levels, on
an institutional level. It needs to
stop."
The Trotter Center used to
host overnight retreats for high
school students. After the inci-
dent in 2013, the center was pro-
hibited from doing so, Rackham
student Angela Abiolasaid.
"Not only is this a space for
us as University students, but it
is also a space that allows us to
introduce our communities to
this campus,"Angela Abiola said.
"And simply the distance from
campus now tells (prospective
students) that we are not valued
in this space."
At the end of the meeting,
studentsevolunteered for differ-
ent teams: the data team, the
research team, the short term
team, the long term team or
members at large.
The short term team will
meet weekly or biweekly with
an administrative team to best
determine how to improve the
current building. The long term
team will meet in the coming
months and years to find a loca-
tion for The New Trotter.

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RELEASE DATE- Friday, February 7,2014
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
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the email ltop, 8868d.'s pile sBury tea fsr 48Knock
briefly 87 Fir tsecond or your'_": hak. 48Asembly-ready LIVE CONCERTS
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Syrian rebels
free hundreds
of inmates

Amid actions,
government key
captured as part of
offensive
BEIRUT (AP) - A suicide
bomber blew himself up at the
gates of a Syrian prison Thurs-
day and rebels stormed in
behind him, freeing hundreds of
inmates as part of an offensive
aimed at capturing key govern-
ment symbols around the north-
ern city of Aleppo, activists said.
Government forces, mean-
while, dropped crude "barrel
bombs" in deadly airstrikes as
both sides escalated their fight
for the strategic city ahead of
a second round of peace talks
set for next week. Opposition
leaders threatened to suspend
the talks over the barrel bomb-
ings.
In the past six days alone, the
makeshift weapons - contain-
ers packed with explosives, fuel
and scrap metal - have killed
more than 250 people in Aleppo,
including 73 children, accord-
ing to the Britain-based Syrian
Observatory for Human Rights.
They include at least 11 who
died Thursday - six of them
from the same family - in the
opposition-held neighborhood
of Masaken Hanano.
Videos uploaded by activists
showed the aftermath, includ-
ing men weeping amid ravaged
buildings and corpses covered
with blankets on the pavement.
"Be careful. There's a corpse
under your feet. .. It's a child!"
someone shouted. The videos
were consistent with reporting
by The Associated Press.
U.N. Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon deplored "the ongo-
ing aerial attacks and the use of
"barrel bombs"to brutal, devas-
tatingeffect in populated areas"

which violate international
humanitarian and human rights
law, U.N. spokesman Martin
Nesirky said.
in other developments, Syr-
ian President Bashar Assad's
government said it has reached
an agreement with the Unit-
ed Nations to let hundreds of
trapped civilians leave besieged
parts of the city of Homs and
permit U.N. humanitarian relief
convoys to enter.
In New York, U.N. deputy
spokesman Farhan Haq said
the United Nations welcomed
reports that the parties agreed
to "a humanitarian pause." He
said the U.N. and humanitarian
organizations have food, medi-
cal aid and other basic supplies
on the outskirts of Homs ready
for immediate delivery as soon
as "the green light" is given for
safe passage.
In Washington, U.S. State
Department spokesman Jen
Psaki welcomed the agreement,
which is expected to be carried
out on Friday, but warned: "We
should not be giving credit to a
regime just for providing food
for a few days to people who are
starving, given that's the right
moral thing to do. This is some-
thing they should have been
doing all along."
The rebels inAleppo declared
a push to seize the city's central
prison and the Kweiras military
air base to the east. Opposi-
tion fighters have been trying
to capture the installations for
months.
Thursday's offensive began
when a Chechen suicide bomber
from the al-Qaida-linked Nusra
Front attacked the prison gates,
according to the Observatory.
Rebel fighters then managed to
gain control of large parts of the
compound. By evening, heavy
clashes between the rebels and
soldiers were raging inside.
The Observatory and other

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