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February 27, 2014 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-02-27

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iE-H lRd Far F0 iIj

Ann Arbor, Michiganv

Thursday, February 27, 2014

michigandailycom

CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT
Pierpont
cafe to close
for major
renovation

BUZZER-BEATEN BOILERS

North Campus venue
will reopen in the fall
with new offerings
By IAN DILLINGHAM
Daily News Editor
Upon their return from Spring
Break, students on North Cam-
pus will have to change their
daily routine with the closure of
the Pierpont Commons Cafd for
renovations. The former Com-
mons Cafe will be overhauled
and reopened as the Fireside
Cafe in the fall.
Administrators and organiz-
ers of the caf6 renovation met
in the current Commons Caf6
Wednesday morning for a "ren-
ovation kickoff," showcasing
some of the new offerings that
will be present in the revamped
location. Students and staff
sampled food from the new caf6
menu and examined computer
renderings of the proposed inte-
rior design.
Commons Cafe is located on

the second floor of Pierpont and
is similar to a food court or din-
ing hall. Pierpont's lower lev-
els include restaurants such as
Panda Express and Quiznos.
University Unions Director
John Taylor said the renovations
are scheduled for completion
before the start of the Fall 2014
semester. In the meantime, some
vendors will move to the build-
ing's ground floor and some food
services will remain operational.
While Taylor said while the clo-
sure could present constraints
during March and April, the
plan allows a significant portion
of the construction to occur over
the summer, when the number
of students using the Commons
is much lower.
The Commons Caf6 currently
hosts a variety of community
vendors, such as Ahmo's Gyro
and Deli and Jamaican Jerk Pit,
which rotate during the week
to provide more options for stu-
dents than fixed venues. Taylor
said this program will continue
after the renovations.
See PIERPONT, Page 3A

) INSIDE
PATRICK BARRON/Daily
Sophomore forward Glenn Robinson III hit a buzzer-beating leaner to give the Michigan men's basketball teama 77-76 win over Purdue Wednesday.
T HU R NAU SER IE S
Spanishos inspire work

Prof.'s childhood
under dictatorship
influences research
By ALLANA AKHTAR
Daily StaffReporter
Spanish Prof Alejandro Her-
rero-Olaizola's accent isn'timme-
diately evident. The 49-year-old
associate chair of the Spanish
department, and one of the most
recent recipients of an Arthur

Thurnau professorship, has lived
in the United States for more than
half of his life, making him more
of a bona fide American than a
foreigner.
But his accent becomes dis-
cernible after a few minutes of
conversation. The same can be
said of his Spanish roots. Herre-
ro-Olaizola's heritage has been a
defining influence on his course-
work and research throughout
his academic career.
Herrero-Olaizola was born in
Bilbao, Spain, a city in the North-

ern Basque country. He had five
siblings and was the youngest of
the sons. In Spain, he attended a
Catholic school for his primary
education. Though he does not
quite know where he made this
realization, Herrero-Olaizola
always knew he wanted to be a
teacher.
"One time, maybe when I was
in the second or third grade, the
teachers asked you to write what
you wanted to be when grew up
and I believe I wrote I wanted to
be a teacher and I believe I wrote

a content remark - I said 'I want-
ed to be a teacher because I feel
that my teachers could be better,'
or something like that," Herrero-
Olaizolasaid.
Decadeslater, Herrero-Olaizo-
la received the Arthur F. Thurnau
professorship for his excellence
in undergraduate teaching at the
University. The Thurnau pro-
fessorship is one of the highest
honors available for faculty and
recipients are also given $20,000
for classroom innovation.
See ROOTS, Page 3A

BUSINESS
Newbarber-
spa location
to open on
E. Liberty
Taylor & Colt will
offer many high
end services geared
toward students
By IAN DILLINGHAM
and AMIA DAVIS
Daily News Editor and
Daily StaffReporter
Male Ann Arbor residents can
expect a barbershop that does
more than the wash-cut-style
procedure opening its doors in
the near future.
Taylor& Colt, an upscale men's
barber-spa, is expected to open
its first U.S. franchise location on
East Liberty Street sometime this
summer. The Canada-based com-
pany currently operates five other
locations in the Toronto area.
Inspired by old English bar-
bershops, the company aims to
incorporate the environment
of a spa salon with a traditional
barbershop into one business.
The company offers "shave-cut-
wash-style" methods for men,
hot towel services, laser hair
See BARBER, Page 3A

RESEARCH
Detroit study to
examine effects
ofbad air quality

Antonia Abbey, a professor of psychology at Wayne State University, speaks about alcohol's role in sexual assault
at the School of Public Health Wednesday.
Lecture explores links in
sexual violence, alcohol

School of Public
Health profs. call
for policy changes to
limit particulates
ByARIANAASSAFF
Daily StaffReporter
As Detroit seeks to revitalize
itself in the wake of bankruptcy,
human health concerns such
as air pollution are receiving
increased attention.
The School of Public Health
has partnered with five other
organizations to continue
researching Detroit's air qual-
ity and hopes to eventually
recommend environmental
policy changes. An announce-
ment from the University last
Tuesday said the collaborative
group received a $2.8 million,
five-year grant from the Nation-
al institute of Environmental
Health Sciences to support the
research.
Health Behavior and Health
Education Prof. Amy Jo Schulz
and Environmental Health Sci-
ences Prof. Stuart Batterman

are co-principal investigators
in the Community Action to
Promote Healthy Environ-
ments project. They are work-
ing to understand why health
problems like cardiovascular
diseases and children's respira-
tory issues are so prevalent in
Detroit.
About 15 years ago, Univer-
sity researchers began exam-
ining how and why poor air
quality in Detroit can be linked
to an increase in the likelihood
of developing health problems,
and how to find solutions.
Batterman said the city's
uniquely high level of indus-
trialization has played a role
in reducing air quality. Large
amounts of traffic that travel
through Detroit on a daily basis
also contribute to the problem.
As a result, cardiovascular
mortality rates and asthma
rates are about 50 percent high-
er in Detroit than in the rest of
the state, Schulz said. infant
mortality rates are also signifi-
cantly higher.
"All three of those health
effects have been associated
with poor air quality," she said.
See DETROIT, Page 3A

Professor reports
half of sexual
assaults involve
intoxication
By AMABEL KAROUB
Daily StaffReporter
On Wednesday afternoon,
Antonia Abbey, professor of
psychology at Wayne State
University, gave a lecture on

the relationship between sexu-
al aggression and alcohol at the
University.
While Abbey's study focused
on a broader age group, she said
there have been many studies
involving college students, as
college is a time when sexual
aggression is very common.
Abbey attributed this preva-
lence to the social environment
that encourages heavy drink-
ing and casual sex.
"You can imagine when
you're in an environment

where your peers are talking
about how many sexual con-
quests they've had," Abbey
said. "There is going to be a lot
more pressure to have sex."
During her talk, Abbey cited
a number of studies that found
roughly 1 in 5 men have com-
mitted an act of sexual aggres-
sion towards women. Studies
show that about half of these
instances involved alcohol
consumption, either by the
man or the woman. Abbey said
See VIOLENCE, Page 3A

WEATHER HI 14
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INDEX NEW S.........................2A SPORTS.....................6A
Vol.CXXIV,No.77 SUDOKU.....................2A CLASSIFIEDS...............6A
02014lTheMichigan Daily OPINION.....................4A B-SI D E1..................1 B
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