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November 18, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-11-18

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, November 18,2013

michigandaily.com

ADMINISTRATION
officials
promise no
layoffs in
transition

RYAN REISS/Daily
Jadyn Freeman, Zoey Taylor and Sara Finachea experiment with chemicals and food dye to make 'elephant toothpaste' during FEMMES, Females Excelling
More in Math, Engineering and Science, at the Medical Science building Saturday.
STEM passion starting early

FEMMES hopes
to inspire young
girls to pursue
science fields
By BROOKE PEARCY
For TheeDaily
Most fourth, fifth or sixth
graders don't get the chance to
learn from a college professor
about how the brain sends sig-
nals to muscles or how a pros-

thetic limb works.
That's unless they attended
the capstone event held Satur-
day by Females Excelling More
in Math, Engineering.
FEMMES is a student-run
organization that hosted the
first of its two capstone events.
The group of both graduate
and undergraduate students
arranged for girls to spend a
day participating in activities
in different science, technolo-
gy, engineering and math fields.
The Michigan chapter of the
organization was started in

2011 after the national group
was founded in 2006 At Duke
University.
Glory May Bradley, one of the
130 girls from nearby schools
who attended, has returned to
the event for the third time to
further explore scientific con-
cepts.
"I like doing all of the experi-
ments," Bradley said. "And I've
liked science since I could talk."
Rackham student Abigail
Garrity, the co-president of
FEMMES, hopes the girls will
leave with exactly the feeling

Bradley described.
"I want them to walk away
with asense of self-efficacy and
empowerment," Garrity said.
"I want them to walk away
inspired and excited about the
experiments and the activities
that they participated in."
Each of the activities at the
event was created and taught
by students and University
professors. Activities ranged
from making ice cream with
liquid nitrogen to creating glow
sticks.
See STEM, Page SA

Centralization of
support services
will move HR and
finance staffs
By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily StaffReporter
Though many faculty and staff
have expressed concern with the
implementation of the University's
new Shared Services Center, Uni-
versity officials assured faculty
last week that no layoffs will result
from the planned integration of
human resource and financial ser-
vices into the consolidated office,
From the centralized location,
they will provide those services to
the University at large, rather than
being placed with specific depart-
ments or colleges.
In preparation for the merging
of services, 50 finance and human
resources positions were unfilled
over the last few months, allowing
the University to maintain posi-
tions for all current employees

impacted by the change.
Additionally, staff members
who accept similar positions in
the Shared Services Center are
not likely to see a decrease in their
base salaries. University spokes-
man Rick-Fitzgerald said admin-
istrators completed individual
meetings with affected staff mem-
bers Friday.
Many of the employees affected
are responsible for services like
billing, employee expense reim-
bursements, travel benefits, ven-
dor payments or registering new
employees through Wolverine
Access. Traditionally, departments
or colleges have retained their
own employees who handle these
duties.
Inthe new Shared Services Cen-
ter, each employee will likely spe-
cialize in one of these tasks. Each
staff member would focus on one
area of the shared services spec-
trum at a University-wide level.
The center will open in April
and the remaining department-
level finance- and human-resourc-
es staff will transition there by
See TRANSITION,,Page 5A

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CSG elections
to fill recently
vacated seats

W
W

Th
ernm
Wed
fill sl
repr
cour
recru
ing t
Al
asser
gene
demi
resen
this
Wint
Th
avail
asser
Grad
LSA,
Infor
Scho
parti
dates

Tinners to take tive ActionParty and forUM
- along with some indepen-
office during dent candidates.
Currently, the only con-
inter semester tested seats are for the LSA
representatives, with two
By AMRUTHA candidates running with
SIVAKUMAR forUM, one with DAAP and
Daily StaffReporter, one as an independent. Law
School student Bryson Nitta,
se Central Student Gov- the election director, said it
sent will hold elections will likely be difficult to attain
nesday and Thursday to a high voter turnout for the
pots vacated by recalled fall elections because most
esentatives over the races are uncontested.
se of the semester, but In an e-mail interview,
siting candidates is prov- LSA sophomore Meagan
o be a challenge. Shokar, vice speaker on the
though the elected assembly, said the majority
mbly representatives are of representatives elected in
rally elected for full aca- March "have been fine with
c-year positions, the rep- attendance" and those who
atatives who are elected left the assembly or have been
week will serve only recalled for missing more
er 2014. than six meetings.
is cycle, there are six "Each and every represen-
able seats on the CSG tative wants the best for the
mbly: two from Rackham student body and all of us at
uate School, two from CSG want an assembly filled
one from the School of with representatives who
mation and one from the have the time to dedicate to
ol of Public Health. Two representing their college or
es are running candi- school's needs, wants, and
- the Defend Affirma- See ELECTIONS, Page 5A

SPORTSMONDAY COLUMN
Allowing
Saturday
to just be
Saturday
EVANSTON, Ill. - For almost
58 minutes of game time, this
was about as bad as football can
'be played. Neither Michigan nor
Northwest-
ern could
score points
- not because
the defenses'
were play-
ing particu-
larly well, but
because the EVERETT
offenses were COOK
just that bad.
Atonepoint
in the fourth quarter, the Wild-
cats had the ball deep in their own
red zone and were forced to punt.
It traveled a grand total of seven
yards. The Wolverines got the ball
on the 10-yard line. You couldn't
ask for more of an offensive gift.
They lost a yard and had to kick
a field goal.
It was ugly football. North-
western dropped four potential
interceptions. Two of them would
have been pick-sixes. There were a
combined 14 punts. On top of that,
it was rainy and windy, aprecursor
to the massive storm that hit Chi-
cago on Sunday morning.
See SATURDAY, Page 5A

ZAK WITUS/Daily
Stephen Rush, an associate professor in the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, speaks at the MCubed Symposium Friday.
MCubed event showcases
interdisciplinary research

Faculty members
collaborate on
humanities-related
research projects
By CHARLOTTE JENKINS
Daily StaffReporter
More than 200 "cubes" pre-
sented research at the MCubed
Symposium Friday in Rackham

Auditorium and the Michigan
League.
Launched in the fall of 2012,
MCubed is the first part of the
University's Third Century Ini-
tiative, a five-year $50 million
plan that aims to promote inno-
vation and collaboration within
the University. MCubed's goal is
to empower faculty members in
different departments and col-
leges to work collaboratively to
produce research that will have a
large societal impact.

A "cube" is made up of three
University faculty members
from different disciplines who
engage in humanities-related
projects. Each cube received at.
least $60,000 of the $15 million
in funds available from the pro-
gram to hire one undergradu-
ate student, graduate student or
postdoctoral researcher to help*
them with their research. At the
symposium, the cubes presented
their research findings from the
See MCUBED, Page SA

WEATHER 9 HI:44
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INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No. 31
©2013 The Michigan Daily
michigondailycom

NEWS........ .. ......... .2A SUDOKU.................... 3A
OPINION ..................4A CLASSIFIEDS...........6A
ARTS .......................6A SPORTSMONDAY..........1B

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