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September 04, 2013 - Image 2

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2A - Wednesday, September 4, 2013

The Michigan Daily michigandaily.com
.90

2A - Wednesday, September 4, 2013 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom
U

MONDAY: TUESDAY: WEDNESDAY: THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
This Week in History In Other Ivory Towers Professor Profiles Alumni Profiles Photos of the Week
PACK THE BOWL-
Taking a break for African politics

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREW WEINER KIRBY VOIGTMAN
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-41e-4115 eat..1241
anweiner@michigandaily.com kvoigtman@michigandaily.com

Mike McGovern is an associ-
ate professor of anthropology,
and has been.working at the Uni-
versity since 2012. He is on sab-
batical for the fall semester.
What are you working on
during your sabbatical?
I'm finishing up a book on
Guinea, which is one of the
main countries where I work
in West Africa. My first book is
on Cote d'Ivoire , and my sec-
ond book is on Guinea, and my
Ph.D. research was on Guinea.
But I've also done research in
Senegal, Mali, Niger, Chad and
also a fair amount in Liberia.
CRIME NOTES

What does your graduate seminars, one that's
research focus on? called Politics' Aesthetics, and
I mainly work on politics. I've taught courses on cosmol-
But, as you may know, anthro- ogy and environs.
pologists approach politics
from quite a different angle What do you do outside of the
than a political scientist would. classroom?
In social times we talk about I'm a rower. I row for the Ann
large-end and small-end stud- Arbor Rowing Club. I like to eat;
ies, which basically mean a my wife is a chef.
large-end study would be more
quantitative. So, what's your favorite
restaurant in Ann Arbor?
What courses do you teach? Oh, let me see, I just had a real-
I teach a course called ly nicemeal at Cafe Zola. Grange
Anthropologies of Insurgency, is also a favorite, and Pacific Rim.
and next semester I'll be teach- I guess I'll say Grange.
ing a lecture course called The
State in Africa. I teach some -KATIEBURKE

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I

ERIN KIRKtAND/Daily
LSA senior Nicolette Techawatanasuk uses the
new computers at the newly renovated Fishbowl on
the first day of classes. Techawatanasuk thinks the
changes are "quite nice" and said she might hang out
at the Fishbowl more now because of them.

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES I

Raise the roof Window woes Tech sale

WHERE: West Quad
Residence Hall
WHEN: Sunday at about
5:30 p.m.
WHAT: Multiple people
were spotted on the build-
ing roof. Citing disorderly
conduct, University housing
staff gave a verbal warning
and escorted the two sub-
jects off the roof, according
to University police.
Skater hater
WHERE: Church St.
WHEN: Sunday around
7:15 p.m.
WHAT: Several subjects
were skateboarding, Uni-
versity Police reported. One
was given a citation for a
regent's ordinance viola-
tion.

WHERE: 700th block of
Fifth St.
WHEN: Saturday or Sun-
day between 1 p.m. and 10
a.m. -
WHAT: A burglary with
forced entry was reported
when a television accessory
was found on the ledge of
an open window, University
Police reported. There are
no suspects.
Getting smokey
WHERE:o1800 block of
McIntyre
WHEN: Sunday around
12:30 p.m.
WHAT: Several people
were smoking at the bus
stop near Northwood IV.
Housing security advised
them of the smoke-free
campus policy, University
Police reported.

WHAT: The Computer
Showcase will host a sale
with special prices on lap-
tops, tablets, software and
accessories. The sale will
run through Sept. 13.
WHO: Information and
Technology Services
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union
and Pierpont Commons

Spanish
lunch break
WHAT: Join other Span-
ish enthusiasts for lunch
and conversation. People all
levels of proficiency are wel-
come to attend.
WHO: School of Nursing
WHEN: 12 p.m.
WHERE: Nick's Cafe, 300
N. Ingalls Building

Harmon exhibit Career

A new study by the World
Health Organization
shows women over 50
years older are living on aver-
age 3.5 years longer over the
last two decades, The New
York Times reports. Most
of the gains were made by
women in wealthier nations.
Though administra-
tors seemto disagree on
the group's impact, it's
clear the Coalition for Tuition
Equality was a drivingforce in
changing University policy.
>> FOR MORE, SEE THE STATEMENT,-
INSIDE
Mississippi's first state-
wide alligator hunt has
commenced and led to
the capture of two alligators,
ABC News reports. The first
catch beat previous record
holders, weighing in at 723.5
pounds.

EDITORIAL STAFF
MatthewSlovin ManagingEditor mjslovin@michigandailycom
Adam RUbenfireManagingNews Editor arube@michigandaily.com
SENIORNEWSEDITORS:AliciaAdamczyk,PeterShahinK.C.Wassman,TaylorWizner
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Adrienne lRberts EditorialPageEditors
SENIOR DIORIAnL PAE DO RSDnWngoe ,eek Wlfe
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS:Aarica Marsh, Megan McDonald
Everett Cook and
Zach Helfand ManagingSports Editors sportseditors@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Alejandro Zuniga, Jeremy Summitt, Neal Rotlschild, Rajat
Khare, DanielWasserman, LizVukelich
ASSnAN spoonS EITRS: Greg Garno, Alexa Dettlebach, Daniel Feldman, Erin
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Kayla Upadhyaya Managing Arts Editor kaylau@michigandaitly.com
SENIORARTSEDITORS: Elliot Alpern, Brianne Johnson,John Lynch,Anna Sadovskaya
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Terra Molengraff Managing Photo Editors photo@michigandaily.com
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DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITOR:Paige Pearcy
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SENIOR COPY EDITORS: Jennie Coleman, Kelly McLauglin
Austen Hufford Online Editor ahufford@michigandaity.com
BUSINESSSTAFF,
Amal Muzaffar Digital Accounts Manager
Doug Soloman University Accounts Manager
Leah Louis-Prescott ClassifiedManager
Lexi Derasmo Local Accounts Manager
Hillary Wang National Accounts Manager
Ellen Wolbert and SophieGreenbaum Production Managers
The Michigan Daily (IssN 074s-967) s ubished Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge
to al readers. Additional copies may be pickedup at the Daily's office for $2. subscriptions for
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The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The AssociatedCollegiate Press.

4

S4

WHAT: The famed #98
jersey of Michigan football
legend Tom Harmon will be
"unretired" for a exhibit of
his life here in Ann Arbor.
A collection of artifacts
includes photos, documents
and other materials. Har-
mon wan Michigan's first
Heisman winner.
WHO: Bentley Historical
Library
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
WHERE: Bentley Histori-
cal Library

workshop
WHAT: Learn what steps
you should take to explore
an array of career choices.
WHO: The Career Center
WHEN: 8 a.m.
WHERE: 3200 Student
Activities Building
CORRECTIONS
. Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

4

MORE ONLINE Love Crime Notes?
Get more online at michigandaily.com/blogs/The Wire

HEY, SEE THAT BIG LIST OF
NAMES OVER THERE?
YOU COULD BE ON THE DAILY'S MASTHEAD.
To join our staff, attend one of our mass meetings,
which start at 7:30 p.m. at 420 Maynard St.:
THURSDAY, SEPT.12
SUNDAY, SEPT.15
TUESDAY, SEPT.17
THURSDAY, SEPT.19

4

4

Endurance swimmer Diana Nyad talks to the media about her record-setting swim from Cubato Florida on Tuesday, Sept.3.
Nyad: Maturity helped me
finish record-breaking swim

64-year-old swims
from Cuba to Fla.
without shark cage
KEY WEST, Fla. (AP) - The
clocks Diana Nyad uses to time
her training swims show that
she's a slower swimmer than she
used to be. That's only natural: At
age 64, she acknowledges she is
no longer the "thoroughbred stal-
lion" she was "back in the day."
And yet, the endurance ath-
lete says she felt stronger than
ever when she completed her
successful effort to become the
first person to swim 110 miles
from Cuba to Florida without a
shark cage.
"Now I'm more like a Clydes-
dale: I'm a little thicker and
stronger - literally stronger, I
can lift more weights," Nyad told
The Associated Press in a'one-
on-one interview Tuesday, a day
after she finished her 53-hour,
record-setting swim:
"I feel like I could walk
through a brick wall. ... I think
I'm truly dead center in the
prime of my life at 64."
Nyad isn't alone among aging
athletes who are dominating
their sports.
Earlier this year, 48-year-old
Beriard Hopkins became the

oldest boxer to win a major title,
scoring a 12-round unanimous
decision over Tavoris Cloud to
claim the IBF light heavyweight
championship.
Tennis player Martina Navra-
tilova played in the mixed dou-
bles competition at Wimbledon
in her late 40s, and hockey leg-
end Gordie Howe played in the
NHL in-his SOs.
Thousands of U.S. athletes,
including 60-year-old Kay
Glynn, also compete during the
Senior Olympics.
Glynn, of Hastings, Iowa,
has won six gold medals in pole
vaulting at the Senior Olympics
and set a new pole vaulting world
record for her age in the 2011
National Senior Games.
Older athletes tend to find
more success in endurance
events than power events such
as sprinting and other sports
that rely on "fast- twitch" muscle
fibers, which are more difficult
to preserve later in life, noted
Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, a physi-
ologist at the University of Illi-
nois Urbana-Champaign.
But just because Nyad was
swimming rather than pounding
her joints against the concrete
doesn't mean she didn't achieve a
remarkable feat, Chodzko-Zajko
said. '
"This ultra, super-length

swimming is brutal regardless,"
he said, adding that another rea-
son athletes are able to endure is
because they often train smarter
and have a mental concentration
that is well honed over decades.
"She's one of any number of 4
people who are redefining what
happens with aging," said Dr.
Michael J. Joyner, an anesthesi-
ologist and exercise researcher
at Mayo Clinic.
"If you start with a highcapac-
ity, you have some reserves,"
Joyner said. "You can lose some
absolute power, but what you
lose in power you can make up
for with experience and strategy
and better preparation."
Nyad first attempted swim-
ming from Cuba to Florida at age
29with ashark cage. She didn't try
againuntil 2011 when she was 61.
She tried twice more in the
past two years before beginning
her fifth attempt Saturday morn-
ing with a leap off the seawall of
the Hemingway Marina into the
warm waters off Havana. She
paused occasionally for nourish-
ment, but never left the water
until she reached the white sand
beaches of the Keys and waded
ashore.
Nyad says her age and matu-
rity should not be discounted
when measuring her most recent
success.

I ,

'"

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