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October 24, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-10-24

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Arnn Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, October 24, 2013

michigandaily.com

ADMINISTRATION
Gratz may
run in 2014
regent race

Firefighters look on as employees of DTE Energy clean up a car crash on State Street near Al Glick Field House Wednesday.
Car crash knocks out power
Driver lost control in the area. ity box full of wires near the also scene repairing the electrical
Captain Jim Budd of the Ann appeared to be damaged. lines and inspecting the gas
of vehicle after Arbor Fire Department said Most of the vehicle's airbags main for damage.
the crash occurred around 3:30 appeared to be deployed in the DTE spokeswoman Randi
'medical emergency' p.m. Suffering from a "medical crash. The car was towed from Berris said crews checked the
emergency," the driver struck a the scene shortly before 5:30 p.m. broken meter, but found no gas
By ADAM RUBENFIRE fire hydrant near on the side of Huron Valley Ambulance leak. She said the house's gas
Managing News Editor the street nearest to the Al Glick spokeswoman Joyce Williams line had not activated.
Field House, Budd said. The car said the victim was taken to About 470 customers were
A car crashed intoa house at then crossed the street, hitting a University Hospital in unstable affected as a result of the elec-
Granger Avenue and South State guard wire that was stabilizing condition. No further details tric outage. Crews were still
Street near the Al Glick Field a power pole in the area. It final- were available about why the working at the scene as of 6:40
House Wednesday afternoon, ly came to rest after hitting the driver lost control, due to pri- p.m., but power should be
destroying part of the home's *house's porch, knocking out a vacy laws. restored sometime Wednesday
porch and knocking out utilities gas meter in the process. A util- DTE Energy crews were on See CRASH, Page 3A

Plantiff in 2003
SCOTUS case is
waiting on ruling in
Schuette suit
By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily StaffReporter
on the steps of the U.S.
Supreme Court earlier this
month, anti-affirmative action
activist Jennifer Gratz, who was
the plaintiff in the 2003 U.S.
Supreme Court case Gratz v. Bol-
linger, did not placate the buzz
around her potential candidacy
for the University's Board of
Regents.
At an on-campus talk Tuesday,
Gratz said she has.not ruled out
a run.
In an interview with The
Michigan Daily, Gratz said after
her remarks her decision will
likely hinge on the Court's deci-
sion in Schuette v. Coalition to
Defend Affirmative Action, the
case for which Gratz traveled to
the court earlier this month.
Schuette v. Coalition chal-
lenges the state of Michigan's

2006 ballot initiative, which
banned the consideration of race
and gender in college admissions.
Though Gratz is neither plaintiff
nor defendant in the case that's
currently before the court, she
is no stranger to the affirmative
action debate.
In Gratz v. Bollinger, the
high court ruled on the Univer-
sity's use of affirmative action
in undergraduate admissions. In
the following years, Gratz played
a key role in passing Proposal
2, Michigan's 2006 affirmative
action ban.
With the state's policy ban-
ning affirmative action again in
the national spotlight, Gratz has
reemerged as one of its main pro-
ponents.
If the court determines that
a state can't make laws against
race- or sex-based admissions
and that a university's govern-
ing body has the autonomous
authority to determine affirma-
tive action policy, Gratz said the
only way to influence the issue
would be from a seat on the
Board of Regents.
Conversely, if the court
upholds the state constitutional
See REGENT, Page 3A

STU DNT GOVERNMENT
School gov't
leaders get to
work on goals

Leaders working
on branding,
housing and
syllabi database
By WILL GREENBERG
Daily StaffReporter
The University's student
governments are looking to
regroup and move forward
this year as each school heads
its own projects and increases
cooperative efforts.
LSA-SG WANTS TO
MAKE DEGREE MORE
. ATTRACTIVE
Initiatives for some of the
larger organizations, such as
LSA Student Government and
Rackham Student Government,
want to increase the student
enjoyment at the University
and improve prospects for the
future.
Sagar Lathia, president of
LSA Student Government, said
he's hoping to use this year as

an opportunity to rebrand the
University's largest school.
Lathia said many LSA stu-
dents have been wary of their
future job prospects compared
to students from the more tech-
nical or specific programs. He
wants to better inform under-
classmen of the resources and
opportunities within LSA, to
help them see the long-term
benefits of an LSA degree.
"Hitting it on both fronts, I
think, will comfort people in
the sense that they're already
in the major that they love but
knowing that they can do what
they want and they have the
support of LSA to get to their
career goals is something that I
think LSA students will really,
really appreciate," Lathia said.
He added that LSA-SG plans
to have alumni involved in the
rebranding campaign as well,
to give students real-life exam-
pies of their future options.
Additional LSA-SG projects
include reorganizing the bud-
get to a rolling budget -which
Lathia says should allow them
to fund more student organiza-
See GOALS, Page 3A

Marjorie Heins, founding director of the Free Expression Policy Project, delivers the Davis, Markert, Nickerson Lecture
on Academic and Intellectual Freedom at Hutchins Hall Wednesday.
Civil rights lawyer lectures
about academic freedom

ANN ARBOR
Squatter
complicates
move-in for
students
Unapproved tenant
kept six students
from moving into
house in Sept.
By MAX RADWIN
Daily StaffReporter
Moving into a house on cam-
pus can be a stressful process.
But it's even worse when you dis-
cover someone is already living
there and refuses to leave.
The tenants of an Elm Street
house operated by Investor's
Property Management delayed
moving in due to a "squatter"
that refused to vacate the unit.
The man living in the house had
sublet the residence through the
prior tenants without the approv-
al of IPM.
Details of the debacle weren't
available earlier this semester
due to ongoing litigation. But
now, the inconvenienced stu-
dents and IPM officials are talk-
ing about the mishap.
On Aug. 27, IPM notified the
six University students who were
See SQUATTER, Page 3A

Heins reflects on
ousting of three
faculty accused of
being communists
By AMABEL KAROUB
For theDaily
Civil liberties attorney Mar-
jorie Heins spoke at the Sen-
ate Assembly's 23rd Lecture on
Academic and Intellectual Free-

dom at the Law School's Honig-
man Auditorium Wednesday
afternoon.
Heins talked about her book,
"Priests of Our Democracy: The
Supreme Court, Academic Free-
dom, and the Anti-Communist
Purge," which describes U.S.
Supreme Court rulings that
have redefined academic free-
dom in recent years.
Much-of her lecture describ-
ing the history of academic
freedom through discussing
Supreme Court cases that

involve the topic. When defin-
ing academic freedom, Heins
referred to the Supreme Court's
-standard, which defines it as a
university's right to "determine
for itself on academic grounds
who may teach, what may be
taught, how it may be taught,
and who may be admitted to
study."
She said this definition is
problematic because it does not
protect freedom of speech for
teachers, only the institution as
See FREEDOM, Page 3A

the breakfast b-side
A look at a local church that
gives breakfast to poor.
, INSIDE

WEATHER HI:49
TOMORROW LO:34

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INDEX NEW S*.......................2A SUDOKU.....................2A
Vol. CXXIII, No.17 OPINION .....................4A CLASSIFIEDS............... 6A
P2013TheMichiganDaily SPORTS........ 5A B-SIDE.. . .........1B
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