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October 18, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-10-18

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ONL,-II WNI IiI I I'AY 'I t}IINTY'1 YBS 1:H OPITO)IIIAL HILLEAOI

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, October 18, 2013

michigandailycom

ADMINISTR ATION
Information
dean, wife to
give $2.5M

VICKY LIU/Daily
Ju'won Harris, a health educator at the Detroit-based Institute for Population Health, answers students' questions about the Teach for America program with
first-year medical student Kimi Warlaumnot at the Ford School of Public Policy Thursday.
TFA aT

Couple bequeaths
largest-ever
donation from
dean to college
By CHRISTY SONG
and WILL GREENBERG
Daily Staff Reporters
In an announcement early
Thursday, School of information
dean Jeffrey MacKie-Mason and
his wife Janet Netz committed
to donating $2.5 million for an
endowed professorship - one of
the largest amounts a dean at the
University has ever donated to
his or her own school or college.
The donation will create the
Jeffrey MacKie-Mason Profes-
sor of Information, which will be
a tenured faculty position in that
school.
MacKie-Mason and Neti are
both University alumni. MacK-
ie-Mason said in an interview
Thursday that he and his wife
feel a strong sense of compassion
toward the values of the School
of Information, which serves 441
undergraduate and graduate stu-
dents.
"My wife and I both believe
deeply in the value of public

universities," MacKie-Mason
said. "We just couldn't be more
excited about (the University's)
future, butit needs the support of
people who believe in it."
This contribution is the latest
in a series of high-profile dona-
tions meant to kick-start the Uni-
versity's upconing fundraising
campaign, Victors for Michigan,
which is set to launch Nov. 8.
In September, University
alum Stephen Ross, namesake
of the Ross School of Business,
donated $200 million for further
improvements to the athletic
campus and the Business School.
At her annual leadership break-
fast in early October, University
President Mary Sue Colemanan-
nounced that she and her hus-
band, political scientist Kenneth
Coleman, would be donating $1
million toward study-abroad ini-
tiatives.
MacKie-Mason said the surge
in donations comes at an impor-
tant time, as state and federal
funding for the University has
been insufficient in recent years.
In a Thursday press release,
MacKie-Mason said his contri-
bution is a great wayto repay the
opportunities providedto himby
the University.
"Faculty and staff across the
See INFORMATION, Page 3A

Panelists say low-
income schools
lack science, math,
programming
By YARDAIN AMRON
Daily Staff Writer
A panel of four Teach For
America alumni and one cur-
rent fellow sat before a small
audience of students Thursday
night to discuss the "crisis" in

science, technology, engineer-
ing and math education - with
the hope of luring more Univer-
sity students with science and
mathematics backgrounds into
the fellowship program.
STEM subjects are often
neglected in low-income
schools, the panelists said,
yet they're considered ciucial
toward students' success in
both college and workforce.
Improving the United States's
competitiveness in these fields
has been a priority of the
Obama administration, which

committed billions over the last
several federal budgets toward
improving STEM education.
"This year, there's a huge
need in the communities and
school districts in which we
place core members for science
and math teachers at all grade
levels," Emily Pendergraft,
regional TFA recruitment man-
ager, said.
Teach for America is a
non-profit organization that
recruits and trains recent
college graduates to teach
full-time for two years in low-

income public schools. Sixty-
seven recent graduates from
the University began teaching
,for TFA this semester.
The program has been
praised for bringing young
professionals into contact with
students and also criticized
for inadequately preparing fel-
lows for the challenges of low-
income schools, many of which
are in urban areas.
At the panel, held at the
Public Policy school, members
discussed their personal expe-
See TFA, Page.3A

ACADEMICS
Kinesiology
adds major in
health, fitness

Inaugural class of
new concentration
has 15 students
By AARON GUGGENHEIM
Daily News Editor
After two years of planning,
the School of Kinesiology has
rolled out a new concentration
to meet the growing demand
for educators and consultants in
physical fitness and wellness.
The Health and Fitness major
is built around a core 49 credits
that teach the fundamentals of
wellness and physical training
and then branches out to two dis-
tinct tracks: physical education
and health and fitness leadership.
The physical education track
prepares students for a teaching
certification in physical educa-
tion, while the research-based
health and fitness leadership
track prepares students for jobs
in which they will promote indi-
vidual and community health.
With rising health-care costs,
many companies are looking

for individuals with similar
backgrounds to lead wellness
programs that reduce medical
expenditures.
Both tracks prepare students
for national certification tests
for personal trainers and other
fitness professionals, and both
guarantee an internship to get
real-world experience and prac-
tice skills learned in the class-
room.
Kinesiology Dean Ron Zer-
nicke said the concentration was
developed for three reasons: to
reorient the school's priorities
to focus on health, wellness and
physical activity and to latch on
to the wide variety of work being
done throughout the University
regarding physical inactivity.
. "What we tried to do was to
figure what were the resources
we have within the school and
then how do we collaborate
across schools to give students
within our school, and others,
the best opportunities," Zernicke
said, adding that alumni have
encouraged the school to add
health and fitness elementsto the
See KINESIOLOGY, Page 3A

BUSINESS
Business is
ood for
high-school
partners
Ann Arbor locals
successful selling
sunglasses on
game days
By CAROLYN GEARIG
Forthe Daily
When Josh Carn-Saferstein
and Noah Hirschl, both Ann
Arbor high school seniors,
decided to design and sell Mich-
igan-themed sunglasses before
University football games last
fall, they didn't expect much.
But after selling out of 500
pairs within three games, they
saw potential for theirbusiness,
Spirit Specs, to grow.
"We've lived in Ann Arbor
our whole lives, and we're both
devoted Michigan fins," Hirschl
said. "Having 110,000 people in
one place where you can just hold
up a prodluct and have tens of
thousands of people walk by (is)
the easiest form of marketing."
Hirschl and Carn-Saferstein
See HIGH-SCHOOL, Page 3A

TRAcYKO/Daily
Jann N. Sarkaria, a radiation oncologist at the Mayo Clinic, delivers his talk "The impact of the blood-brain barrier
on limiting therapeutic efficacy in GBM" at the Taubman Institute Thursday.
Visiting doctor lectures on
brain tu-mor clinical trial

rent research on glioblastoma,
a cancerous tumor.
oncologist talks Glioblastomas are highly
malignant brain tumors that
research, treatment arise from the supportive brain
tissue. Sarkaria'sresearchaims
By ALLANA AKHTAR to find drugs that would work
Daily StaffReporter in tandem with radiation treat-
ment to advance treatment of
Jann Sarkaria, a renowned the disease.
radiation oncologist at the He is currently developing
Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, lec- novel radio-wave-based treat-
tured Thursday about his cur- ments and monitoring -drug

efficacy through repeated
imaging of the malignancies.
Sakaria's work also focuses
on identifying which types of
patients benefit most from the
cutting-edge treatment.
During his lecture, Sakaria
outlined his methods for
investigating treatments for
glioblastomas, which starts
by taking tumor cells from
patients and putting them into
See BRAIN, Page 3A

The Big Move
the transition of Funchess
tight end to wide receiver.
INSIDE

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