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October 09, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-10-09

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IC41pan allm

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

michigandaily.com

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CSG partners
with IFC to
expand Blue
Bus services

Routes to run
Thurs. through Sat.,
include off-campus
neighborhoods
By AMRUTHA SIVAKUMAR
Daily StaffReporter
When January comes roll-
ing around, students can expect
to see more Blue Buses rolling
through off-campus neighbor-
hoods.
The Central Student Govern-
ment announced Tuesday that
S5 it had partnered with the Inter-
fraternity Council to pilot an
off-campus bus route that will
run at least three days of the
week. Starting Winter 2014, the
bus route will utilize existing
Ann Arbor Area Transportation
Authority and University bus
stops from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. on
Thursdays, Fridays and Satur-
days.
After re-reading all of the
crime alerts that he has received
since arriving at the University
four years ago, CSG President

Michael Proppe said the alerts
prove that there is a need for
safer off-campus transporta-
tion services. He said 84 percent
of reported crimes took place
after 10:00 p.m., 67 percent took
place off-campus and 64 percent
occurred in scenarios in which
the victim was walking.
The idea of a bus route oper-
ating off campus was first dis-
cussed during an IFC during
the Winter 2013 semester. As
a result, Proppe and CSG Vice
President Bobby Dishell, also the
vice president of recruitment for
IFC, incorporated an off-campus
route as one of their six platform
promises in the March CSG elec-
tions.
In a process that began in
April and involved dialogue
that lasted the duration of the
summer and included meeting
with University administrators
in Parking and Transportation
Services, University of Michigan
Police Department and the Office
of Student Life.
Discussions with the AA4TA
regarding the agency's own
research solidified that a fixed
See BUS, Page 3A

ERIN KIRKLAND/Daily
University President Mary Sue Coleman gives her final State of the University address at the Ross Business School Tuesday. She and her husband, political
scientist Ken Coleman, donated $1 million toward global scholarships.
Coleman donates $1lmu.

At final address,
Coleman and
husband donate to
globalscholarships
By JENNIFER CALFAS and
SAM GRINGLAS
DailyStaffReporters
Before University President
Mary Sue Coleman reached the
podium at her annual leader-
ship breakfast Tuesday morn-
ing, the atmosphere inside Ross
School of Business's colloqui-
um had already become bitter-

sweet.
In her final State of the Uni-
versity address, Coleman's
impending departure was evi-
dent in her reflections on devel-
opment, research and student
life with rounds of applause
and cheers. The gathering of
administrators and Univer-
sity supporters lauded their
president not only for the last
year's work, but for more than a
decade spent at the University's
helm.
"It would be easy to be a bit
melancholy, but there's no time
for that," Coleman said. "There's
simply too much momentum to
do anything but look ahead."

During her speech, she laid
out lofty goals for "the Michi-
gan of tomorrow," including a
$1-billion campaign fundrais-
ing goal for financial aid alone
- nearly double the $545 mil-
lion raised for that purpose dur-
ing the previous campaign, The
Michigan Difference. Coleman
said student support must be
the top priority of The Victors
for Michigan Campaign, set to
begin Nov.8.
"We want every student, no
matter where they hail from, or
what their family circumstance,
to have access to a Michigan
education," she said. "No goal
is more important. We must

provide financial support for
talented students we admit to
ensure the academic quality of
Michigan."
Coleman also addressed the
national concern of college
affordability, which has been
compounded by rising tuition
rates at the University. Between
the 2004 and 2012 academic
years, LSA tuition increased 60
percent for in-state students and
55 percent for out-of-state stu-
dents.
To ensure that students see
financial aid rise with tuition,
the campaign will work to
ensure that higher education is
See BREAKFAST, Page 3A

RESEARCH
Study to
examine
health,
religion
$8M project to
examine links
between spirituality
and wellness
By KATIE BURKE
Daily News Editor
Going to church may be good
for the soul, but a University
researcher is looking to find out
if it lowers blood pressure too.
Public Health Prof. Neal
Krause and four of his colleagues
have received $8 million from
the John Templeton Foundation
to conduct in-depth research in
the next three years on the rela-
tionship between religion, spiri-
tuality and health.
"The field (of religion and
health) is very disoriented, very
disjointed; a phenomenon like
religion is very complex," Krause
See GRANT, Page 3A

STUDENT LIFE
Students prepare for
youth conference on
global climate change

VIRGINIA LOZvNO/Daiiv
Michael Higson and his service dog, Africa, speak at the Delta Gamma Lectureship in Values & Ethics in Rackham
Auditorium Tuesday
Delta Gamma Lecturership
teaches disability awareness

Funded by CSG,
more students will
attend this year
By YARDAIN AMRON
Daily StaffReporter
As University students count
down the days to Fall Break,
about 50 students have their
hearts set on the weekend after,
when they will carpool to Pitts-
burgh to join 10,000 fellow
youth leaders from across the
nation for the Powershift con-
ference.
The biannual youth summit
is aimed at training and edu-
cating the next generation on
climate change and demand-
ing from leaders a shift in pol-
icy from fossil fuels to clean
energy. From Oct. 18 to Oct. 21,
registered youth leaders will
hear from keynote speakers
and participate in panel and
workshop trainings on a range
of environmental and social
issues. Participants will also
enjoy concerts featuring artists
such as Big K.R.I.T. and Talib
Kweli.
Created and organized by
the youth-led Energy Action

Coalition, the conference
entered the international scene
in 2007, when a few hundred
youth leaders converging on
Washington, D.C. quickly grew
to 6,000. That number doubled
to almost 12,000 by 2009.
This year will mark the Uni-
versity's first sizeable presence
at the conference. Public Policy
junior Marissa Solomon was
still a high-school senior and
aspiring rabbi when she attend-
ed Powershift in April 2011.
Having already been accept-
ed to the University, Solomon
noticed a lack of Wolverines at
the summit. There were only
two, to be exact, perhaps due to
the April conference's concur-
rence with finals week. In com-
parison, she said there were 50
students from Ohio State Uni-
versity, another 50 from Michi-
gan State University and 20
from Kalamazoo College.
While this year's conference
does not coincide with finals,
Solomon and her team still con-
fronted many hurdles. Fund-
ing remained the biggest issue.
EAC charges a registration
fee that has risen from $50 to
$80 - a fee many students are
unable to afford.
See POWERSHIFT, Page 3A

Speaker survived.
9/11 with help of
seeing eye dog
By CHARLOTTE JENKINS
Daily StaffReporter
The University's chapter
of the Delta Gamma women's
fraternity hosted best-selling
author Michael Hingson for its
second Lectureship in Ethics

and Leadership event Tuesday
to a crowd of about 200 stu-
dents and guests.
Blind since birth, Hingson
was at work on the 78th floor
of the World Trade Center on
9/11. Roselle, then his guide
dog, led Hingson and others
down the 78 flights of stairs
and through the chaotic situa-
tion that ensued that day.
Lectureship is a national
Delta Gamma event that will
occur on 19 campuses through-

out the country this year. This
is Delta Gamma's second such
event at the University. The
first was held in spring 2011
and featured Kerry Kennedy,
an American human rights
activist and writer.
LSA junior Ailie Steir, vice
president of communications
for Delta Gamma, said the
event's purpose is to bring
someone to campus that can
talk about ideals, values and
See DISABILITY, Page 3A

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