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September 03, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-09-03

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O~ tN J) 1 ) 1 I -i ll iI I sSI 11 )1 1(AB1 F\.I I I I,; I) s

Ann Abor, Michigan

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

michigandaily.com

CAMPUS SAFETY
'U' changes sex
misconduct
procedures

PICK YOUR PRODUCE

New policy demands
investigations into
all allegations
By AUSTEN HUFFORD
Online Editor
The University has adopted a new
policy for how it responds to student
sexual-misconduct allegations, tran-
sitioning from a complainant-driven
model to one driven by University
investigators.
Per the policy, the University has
assumed the burden of internally
investigating all allegations of student
sexual misconduct, which includes
allegations of sexual harassment and
sexual assault. The policy doesn't deal
with the criminal repercussions that
result from law enforcement investi-
gations, which are outlined in federal,
state and local laws.
A 2011 Department of Education
mandate clarified that Title IX, the
federal anti-sex- discrimination stat-
ute, obligates universities to actively
investigate sexual misconduct alle-
gations. In response, the University
reviewed its sexual misconduct alle-
gation policies and implemented an
interim policy in August 2011.
The newly effective final policy fol-
lows fine-tuning process over the last
two years, which broughttogether the
directors of the Office of Student Con-
flict Resolution, the Office of Insti-
tutional Equity, the Sexual Assault

Awareness and Prevention Center
and a staff member in the Office of
the General Counsel. In addition to
discussions at several community
forums, survivors of sexual assault
and other people who were impacted
by the previous policy were also con-
sulted.
The policy also instructs the Title
IX coordinator, the person who
ensures the University follows the
mandate's regulations, to notify law
enforcementofpotentialcriminalsex-
ual misconduct allegations. This may
prevent situations where investigators
know about criminal misconduct alle-
gations but do not inform police. This
seemingly occurred recently when
reports of sexual misconduct at the
Zaragon Place apartments were not
conveyed to University police until a
third student came forward making
accusations against the suspect intwo
previous assaults.
The new policy clarifies that only
three University divisions - SAPAC,
Counseling and Psychological Ser-
vices and the Office of Ombuds -
offer full confidentiality to students
who report misconduct. It states that
students should assume that reports
made to any other University official
will be shared with the Title IX coor-
dinator and investigated following the
new procedure.
Non-confidential sources include
professors and residential advisers.
This has raised some concern over
whether survivors could unknowing-
See MISCONDUCT, Page SA

Ls ar
LSA senior Madeline Dunn observes the student farm at the Matthei Botanical Gardens on Monday

ADAM GLANZMAN/Daly

CRIME
Assault reported late

AAPD fails to
notify UMPD of
sexual assault
near campus
By TAYLOR WIZNER
Daily News Editor
A student was sexually
assaulted Saturday while
walking in the parking lot of
an off-campus apartment,
according to a ┬░University

crime alert sent out Monday about 10 p.m. Saturday on
evening. East University Ave. near Hill
While University Police St. when an unknown male
often release crime alerts approached her and grabbed
regarding off-campus sexual her buttocks before riding
assaults with information away on a bicycle.
from the Ann Arbor Police The suspect is described
Department, University Police as a 5-foot-9-inch, middle-
said they weren't made aware aged black male who was
of a sexual assault reported to wearing a blue hat, shorts
the AAPD on Saturday until and a gray T-shirt at the time
an inquiry by The Michigan of the incident.
Daily on Sunday afternoon. UMPD is classifying the
According to UMPD, the assault as fourth-degree crim-
student was walking in an inal sexual conduct, which isa.
apartment parking lot at misdemeanor.

In an interview with the
Daily before the crime alert
was sent, the student said a
UMPD officer called her to
explain there would be no
public alert sent out because
University Police didn't have
enough information about the
incident.
However, when asked Sun-
day whether an alert would
be sent out, University Police
said the Daily's inquiry Was
the first they had heard of the
incident. Shortly after, a crime
See CRIME, Page 5A

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CSG
gears up
for new
fall term
Pres., VP to announce
commision chair
nominations
By AMRUTHA SIVAKUMAR
Daily StaffReporter
Every year, asa fresh lot of students
set foot on campus, a new Central Stu-
dent Government takes its seats at the
helm of the student body.
On Tuesday, for the first time this
academic year, CSG President Michael
Proppe and Vice President Bobby
Dishell, leaders of CSG political party
youMICH, will lead a new slate of stu-
dent body representatives.
As the 2012-2013 academic year
came to a close, the CSG executive
branch completed a total of 58 projects
over eight areas of campus improve-
ment. Former CSG President Manish
Parikh and Vice President Omar Hash-
wi fulfilled all of their election prom-
See CSG, Page SA

GRE K LIFE
FratPAC lobbies U.S.
Senate, House for
tax-exempt pledges

Le
m
t

ADAM GLANZMAN/Daily
Freshmen move into the newly renovated East Quad Residence Hall building Monday, Aug. 26.
Residence Life Initiative
updates residence halls

South, West Quad
are final projects
of Coleman's
initiative
By WILL GREENBERG
Daily StaffReporter
This is the first article in a
series on housing at the Univer-
sity.
A 2004 University Presi-
dential Initiative described the

future of student residence hall
life at the University as creat-
ing a "good city." Nine years
later, the city is two major
reconstructions
away from creating
a fully modernized
and interconnected
dorm life.
The Residen-
tial Life Initiative
includes an array of
both major and minor reno-
vations to most of the 18 resi-
dence halls on campus. The
RLI continues with ongoing

renovations to South Quad
Residence Hall, and will con-
clude with construction in
West Quad Residence Hall
starting May 2014.
University Hous-
ing spokesman Peter
Logan described Uni-
versity President Mary
Sue Coleman's vision for
the residence halls as an
enhancement to the resi-
dents' education inside and
outside of the classroom.
"Our focus has been on
See HOUSING, Page SA

Ab
tors a
senta
life d
Bloor
ing ag
Th
provi
mer i
a mul
for G
throu
Th
Actio
year-
tee th
to fra
work
woulc
alum:
write
const

gislation'would their chapters' houses.
Under current rules, only
ake more types money donated to fraternities
and sororities for the purposes
of donations of education, such as for the cre-
ation of alibrary, qualifies as tax-
"ax-deductible, deductible.
The bill, first reported by
By STEPHANIE Bloomberg, wastintroduced in
SHENOUDA 1996 after a fire at a University
Daily StaffReporter of North Carolina fraternity
killed five students and garnered
out40 percentofU.S. sena- national attention.
nd a quarter of U.S. repre- Ann Arbor's fraternity : and
lives participated in Greek sorority houses have suffered
uring college, according to from several fires in the past
nberg. Now, they're pledg- decades as well. Most recently,
gain. damage caused bya blaze in 2008
is time, however, their forced the University's chapter of
ding loyalty to their for- Delta Upsilon to undergo a four-
institutions by supporting year remodelontheir house.
lti-million dollar tax break Mary Beth Seiler, director
reek life as it makes its way of Greek life at the University,
igh Congress. says the new legislation would
e Fraternity Political have a positive effect on Univer-
n Committee, an eight- sity Greek life, makingit easier to
old political action commit- fund the renovations that many
tat lobbies on issues related of the sorority and fraternity
eternities and sororities, is houses require.
ing to pass legislation that "I actually had kind of forgot-
d effectively allow Greek ten thatthis legislation was pend-
ni to donate money asa tax ing because it has been going on
-off to directly fund the for such a long time," Seiler said.
ruction or renovation of See FRATS, Page SA

y Grande Debut
i e1aGrande channels Mariah
taa Carey on 'Yours Truly.'
- - n PAGE 6A

WEAT H ER H 81
TOMOR ROW L 54
. .. s

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INDEX
Vol. CXXIII, No.123
┬ę20t3The Michigan Daily
michigandaily~com

NEWS..... ........ 2A DISCOUNTS .............8A
OPINION.... .....4A SPORTSTUESDAY..........1B
ARTS ......................6A NEW STUDEN ED..........1C

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