100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 2013 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2013-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2A - Thursday, October 3, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michiganclaily.com

2A - Thursday, October 3, 2013 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

FFOR THE KIDS

(Tfit cIiian Odaijy
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREW WEINER KIRBY VOIGTMAN
Editor in chief u esiness Manager
7a4-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 eat. 1241
anweiner@michigandaily.com kvoigtman@michigandailyeom

Businessman also teaches

Brad Keywell is the co-founder
and managingpartner ofLight-
bank, a venturefund investing in
technology businesses.
He's also co-founder and director
of Groupon, co-founder and direc-
tor ofMediaBank and co-founder
and director ofEcho Global Logis-
tics.
Are there any experiences
you had during your time as a
student that you use in your
career today?
There were many experi-
ences. I started in the LSA
program then I switched into
the BBA program, and I also
went to law school at Michi-
gan. The same time that I was
going to school, I was starting

businesses; I had five different
businesses that I started over
the course of my time in Ann
Arbor, and I had a number of
employees by the time that I
was a senior. And the process
of starting and growing busi-
nesses across various disci-
plines while at the same time
going to school offered me lots
of experiences and lessons that
I still use.
As both a professor and
entrepreneur, how do you
bringsome of your personal
experiences into your
instruction?
I lecture at the University
at least once a year, and I also
teach an MBA-level class on
technology and entrepreneur-

ship at the University of Chi-
cago Booth School of Business,
and I try to bring as much of my
experience as an entrepreneur
and my experience building
business into the classroom. I
both tell stories from my busi-
ness life and use real-world
examples from growing busi-
nesses as the context of dis-
cussion in the classroom and
the students really appreciate
having that type of access and
interaction around things that
are going on in the real world
right now.

Newsroom
734-418-4115 opt.3
Corrections
corrections@michigandaily.com
Arts Section
arts@michigandaily.com
Sports Section
sports@michigandaily.com
Display Sales
dailydisplay@gmaitcom
Online Sales
onlineads@michigandaily.com

News Tips
news@michigandaily.com
LetterstotheEditor
tothedaily@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page
opinion@michigandaily.com
PhotographySection
photo@michigandaily.com
Classified Sales
classiied@michigandaily.com
Finance
finance@michigandaily.com

-SARA YUFA

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Stolen satchel
WHERE: 1420 Washington
Heights
WHEN: Tuesday at 9:35
a.m.
WHAT: A purse was stolen
from a inside a backpack on
the fifth floor of the Thomas
Francis Jr. Building, Uni-
versity Police reported. The
theft occurred between 1
p.m. and 4 p.m. on Monday.

Mo' damage
WHERE: 911 Hill Street
WHEN: Tuesday around
9:40 a.m.
WHAT: A vehicle began to
back out of a parking spot
and hit a moped driving
by in the street, University
Police reported. The driver
of he moped was not injured
but the moped was not so
fortunate.

Expo tips
WHAT: During this small
group discussion, students
will share their Fall Career
Expo experiences and give
advice on how to make the
most of the opportunity.
WHO: Osher Lifelong
LearningInstitute .
WHEN: Today from
10 a.m. to11:30 a.m.
WHERE: Student Activities
Building

Relation
series
WHAT: As part
Relationship En
Series, students,
the skills necess
dealing with dif
relationships.
WHO: Counseli
Psychological St
WHEN: Today f
p.m. to 5 p.m.

VICTORIA LIU/Daily
Member of University's chapters of Delta Delta
Delta sorority and Chi Psi fraternity colect
donations for Mott's Children's Hospital on the
Diag Wednesday.
__ _ T H RE fHIN(S YOU
-Al
ship
The Vancouver Sun
reported that up to 500
of the mink escaped a farm in
hancement the rural city of Abbotsford.
will learn Police are warning motorists
ary for to watch the highways for the
ficult critters.
ng and
ervices
from 4:15 This week the b-side
goestothe Motor City
for a look at Detroit
oduce SOUP, a monthly din-
ner where proceeds go to a
ruits, selected copmmunity project.
other local ,> FOR MORE, SEE INSIDE
available
University
ley
ash will be Protesters outside of
the Detroit Institute
ty Hospitals of Art rallied against
from 11 a.m. plans to evalute and possibly
sell the musuems collection
ley Triangle in face of the city's bankrupty,
The New York Times
reported.

EDITORIAL STAFF
MatthewSlovin Managing Editor mjslovin@michigandaily.com
AdamnRubenfireManagingNews Editor arube@michigandaily.com
SENIORNEWSEDITORS:AliciaAdamczyk,PeterShahin,K.C.Wassman, TaylorWizner
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Ariana Assaf, Jennifer Calfas, Hilary Crawford, Ian
Dillingham, Will Greenberg, Sam Gringlas, Matt Jackonen, Rachel Premack, Stephanie
Shenouda, Christy Song
Melanie Kruvelisand opinioneditors@michigandaity.com
Adrienne Roberts EditorialPageEditors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Dan Wang, Derek Wolfe
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aarica Marsh, Megan McDonald
Everett Cook and
Zach Helfand Managing Sports Editors sportseditors@michigandailycom
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Alejandro Zuniga, Jeremy Summitt, Neal Rothschild; Rajat
Khare, Daniel Wasserman, Liz Vukelich
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS: Greg Garno, Alexa Dettlebach, Danie'Feldman, Erin
Lennon, Lev Facher, Max Cohen
Kayla Upadhyaya Managing Arts Editor kaylau@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Elliot Alpern, Brianne Johnson, John Lynch, Anna Sadovskaya
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: JohnBohn, Sean Czarnecki, Max
Indin, Akshay Seth, Katie Steen, Steven Tweedie.
Adam Glanzman and
Terra Molengraff ManagingPhoto Editors photo@michigandaity.com
SENIOR PHOTOEDITORS: TeresaMathew,Todd Needle
ASSISTANT PHOTOEDITORS:KatherinePekala,PaulSherman,,
McKenzie Berezin, Ruby Wallau, Patrick Barron
Kristen tCeghorn and
Nick Cruz Managing Design Editors design@michigandaily.com
Haley Goldberg Magazine Editor statement@michigandaily.com
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITOR:PaigePearcy
Josephine Adams and
Tom McBrien copychiefs copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIORCOPYEDITORS:JennieColeman,KellyMcLauglin
Austen Hufford Online Editor ahufford@mnchigandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Amal MUzaffar Digital Accounts Manager
Doug Soloman University Accounts Manager
Leah Louis-Prescott Classified Manager
Lexi Derasm LocalAccounts Manager
Hillary Wang National Accounts Manager
Ellen Wolbert and SophieGreenbaum Production Managers
Te Mihsganb tDa eltS SNt-s) ispblishe Monday through Friday dring the fall and
wne terms bystents at teivesitytsof Michigan. One copyisavailabletfreohare
toal areaders. Additionalcopies may be picked up at the Daily'seoffice for $2.Subscriptions for
fall term, startgintSeptember, viaU.S. mail are $110. Winete rm(anuary through Aprilis
$115, yearlong (September through April) is $195. University affiliates are subject to a reduced
subscription rate.On-campus subscriptions for fall term are $35.Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press. .

S

Erryday I'm Clever cable
hustlin' cutters

Q' and 'A' with Fresh pr

WHERE: LSA Building
WHEN: Tuesday at 4:45
p.m.
WHAT: A subject was
reported to be selling Uni-
versity-owned equipment
for his or her own monetary
gain. No further leads have
been provided to University
Police.

WHERE: 900 block of
South University Avenue
WHEN: Wednesday at 1:45
a.m.
WHAT: A bicycle outside
of the UGLI and fastened
with a cable lock was stolen
between 8 p.m. on Tuesday
and 1:40 a.m. Wednesday,
University Police reported.

musician
WHAT: Alumnus Michael
Wayne, a successful,
orchestral member and solo
performer will share the
tricks of the music trade
with students.
WHO:School of Music,
Theater, and Dance
WHEN: Today at 10:40 am.
WHERE: Moore Building

WHAT: Fresh f
vegetables ando
products will be
for purchase at I
Hospital's Tows
Triangle. Only c
accepted.
WHO: Universi
WHEN: Todayf
to 1:00 p.m.
WHERE: Tows

i

Government shutdown hits
hard for American Indian tribes

MPoweredexpands off campus
during annual competition

0

Tribal programs
take cuts and
furloughs hundreds
CROW AGENCY, Mont. (AP)
- American Indian tribes have
more than access to national
parks on the line with the gov-
ernment shutdown, as federal
funding has been cut off for
crucial services including foster
care payments, nutrition pro-
grams and financial assistance
for the needy.
For the 13,000 members of
southeast Montana's Crow
Tribe, the budget impasse had
immediate and far-reaching
effects: Tribal leaders fur-
loughed more than 300 workers
Wednesday, citing the shut-
down and earlier federal budget
cuts.
As a result, tribal programs
including home health care for
the elderly and disabled, bus ser-
vice for rural areas, and a major

irrigation project were suspend-
ed indefinitely.
"It's going to get hard," said
Shar Simpson, who leads the
Crow's home health care pro-
gram. "We're already taking
calls from people saying, 'Who's
going to take care of my mom?
Who's going to take care of my
dad?"'
Some tribes intend to fill the
gap in federal funds themselves,
risking deficits of their own
to cushion communities with
chronic high unemployment and
poverty against the effects of the
budget battle.
"Do we just throw kids onto
the street, or do we help them?
Most likely we're going to help
those families and do whatever
we can until this is unresolved,"
said Tracy "Ching" King, presi-
dent of northern Montana's Fort
Belknap Reservation.
But for other tribes, basic ser-
vices stand to take a direct hit.
That includes programs heavily
subsidized by federal agencies

5550MB

and others paid for with tribal
money that is suddenly unavail-
able because it's being held by
the Department of Interior, trib-
al leaders said.
Essential activities such as law
enforcement, firefighting and
some social services will contin-
ue, said Bureau of Indian Affairs
spokeswoman Nedra Darling.
Programs that did not make the
list include residential care for
children and adults, cash assis-
tance for the poor and payments
to vendors who provide foster
care.
How long those programs will
continue on reservations depends
on the duration of the shutdown
and how much money individual
tribes can spare. The BIA pro-
vides services to more than 1.7
million American Indians and
Alaska Natives from more than
500 recognized tribes.
Crow Chairman Darrin Old
Coyote said his tribe decided to
furlough workers now, hoping
the move will be only temporary,
rather than push into deficit a
budget stretched thin by earlier
federal cuts and recent declines
in revenue from a coal mine on
the reservation.
"We're taking a proactive
approach," Old Coyote said. The
316 furloughed workers represent
about half the tribe's employees.
In South Dakota, Yankton
Sioux Tribe Vice Chairwoman
Jean Archambeau said the shut-
down means money for heating
assistance won't be coning this
fall.
"I don't know what we're going
to do," she said. "They're already
predicting snow out west and
possibly in this area of the state."
General assistance payments,
which help people with gen-
eral needs not covered by other
programs, also have been cut,
Archambeau said.
The National Congress of
American Indians and tribal.
leaders said the "double wham-
my" of the shutdown and the
earlier automatic spending, cuts
known as sequestration illus-
trates their vulnerability in the
federal budget process.

It's
annua
tion, 1
close
pitche
Th
by M
run e
- enc
involh
by pi
ideas
Last
almos
Eni
O'Nei
ered,
studei
entrel
"Th
peopl
be th
ever a
it was
"Wed
to any
Stu
to su
top 2(
two-v
where
exper
one a
their)
The
tition
rangir
cation
receiv
ther t

En
gr

trepreneurship This year, MPowered is
expanding its outreach past
'oup tries pilot Ann Arbor, as Pennsylvania
State University's entrepre-
program at neurial campus organization,
Innoblue, is hosting a 1,000
Penn State Pitches competition of their
own.
By CARLY FROMM O'Neil said MPowered hopes
Daily StaffReporter to expand 1,000 Pitches to
campuses,,across the country,
just over a week into the with Penn State acting as the
l 1,000 Pitches competi- pilot program.
but MPowered is already "Penn State is an experi-
to hitting 1,000 student ment," O'Neil said. "They've
es. created a platform for as many
e competition, hosted schools as possible to start fil-
Powered - a student- ing under the 1,000 Pitches
ntrepreneurial group on brand."
courages students to get Eli Kariv, president of Inno-
ved in entrepreneurship blue at Penn State, said he's
tching, unique business excited the competition will
in various categories. help to stimulate creativity on
year MPowered received his campus.
t 5,000 pitches. "We were eager to bring
gineering junior Chris 1,000 Pitches to Penn State
l, the president of MPow- because of the cultural change
said he wants every that it created at Michigan,"
nt to find their inner Kariv said. "It seems like
preneur. 1,000 Pitches has created an
here are going to be a lot of environment and culture at
e in the world that could the University of Michigan
e greatest entrepreneurs where people value their own
and just never know that ideas."
s an option," O'Neil said. Innoblue and MPowered
lon't want that to happen areengaging in a competition,
'one at Michigan." though MPowered has a signif-
dents have seven weeks icant advantage with its estab-
bmit their pitches. The lished popularity on the Ann
00 pitchers then enjoy a Arbor campus. Kariv said Penn
week development period State's goal is to receive more
they can speak with than 1,000 pitches in its first
ts and collaborate with year, as well as "get the ball
nother to better develop rolling" on a cultural change at
pitches. the university.
e winners of the compe- Business sophomore Zach-
- one for each category, ary Wloch, the director of mar-
ng from health to edu- keting for MPowered, wishes
a to mobile apps - will the best for the 1,000 Pitches
'e a $1,000 prize to fur- competition at PSU.
heir business ideas. "Hopefully, we'll see them

get 1,000 pitches - reach the
namesake - this year," Wloch
said. "It's a friendly competi-
tion."
This year, MPowered not
only hopes to expand to other
campuses, but integrate itself
further into the University
community as well. Wloch is
optimistic about new tactics
to expand 1,000 Pitches's out-
reach on campus this year,
using methods such as "Pitch
Stations" - which will allow
students to pitch on the go -
and new social-media strate-
gies.
The organization is also
hoping to set up sponsored
pitch stations - the typical
pitch stations accompanied by
representatives from an entre-
preneurial company. Students,
along with pitching the idea on
video, will be able to pitch their
idea to the company on site and
receive feedback.
Wloch envisions that the
sponsored "Pitch Stations" will
change the process of recruit-
ing.
"(Companies) can see stu-
dents' creative processes at
work, and then they can see
how they develop the pitch,"
Wloch said. "So rather than
just finding out someone's
name and getting a resume,
you really get to see what the
person is like and how they
might be able to work for your
company."
He said he views 1,000
Pitches as a platform for fur-
ther development.
"We can encourage win-
ners of 1,000'pitches and par-
ticipants to start using other
projects within MPowered to
develop themselves," Wloch
said.

WATCH OUR VIDEO SHOW
On "This Week at the Daily," we bring you the story behind our
stories. Watch this week's show tonight on michigandaily.com

0

4

w

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan